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Roads To The Otherworld: Contemporary Haunted Roads And A Sacred Landscape

Oldnall Road, a seemingly unremarkable two-mile rural stretch of B-road between the towns of Halesowen and Stourbridge in the West Midlands, hit the international headlines a few months ago (1) following reports of a series of sightings of an apparition. Reports of 'road ghosts' are nothing unusual, they form an important part of 'ghost lore' throughout the world (2). Read More »

Somerset House, Stourbridge

The Somerset House pub has a long history of ghostly goings on. This is possibly associated with bodies being stored in the cellar in the 1940s whilst coffins were being made on the premises. Read More »

Starving Rascal, Stourbridge

The Starving Rascal is named after an event in Victorian times which has had lasting repercussions. A beggar turned up at the pub during a particularly harsh winter to ask for some food and drink. He was cruelly turned away by the landlord. Before he died of exposure and malnutrition outside on the steps the beggar placed a curse on the pub. Read More »

The Ashwood, Wordsley

The Ashwood is a fairly modern pub at the centre of a residential estate. Whilst nothing has actually been seen at the pub, nevertheless the building is prone to some unusual phenomena. Occasionally, singing described as operatic has been heard even though there was no obvious cause. Read More »

The Badgers Sett

Badgers Sett

Roughly thirty years ago Detective Constable Roger Ryder had an experience as he passed the Badgers Sett, then known as the Gypsies’ Tent on the A456. An interview with the now retired detective appeared in the Black Country Bugle in 2007. Read More »

The Cat Inn, Enville

Cat Inn - Enville

The ghost story of The Cat Inn concerns an old tramp, Billy Pitt, who collapsed in the snow one bitter cold night in mid-winter. The howling of Billy's dog, Jim, brought a group of drunks out of the inn to see what was going on. They dragged Billy into the pub and revived him by the fire. Read More »

The Crabmill

Crab Mill

The Crabmill used to be known as The Oldswinford and at one time many years ago it was a Doctor's surgery. Temporary managers are particularly wary here as they are likely to be treated to loud noises coming from the empty rooms in the early hours of the morning. Read More »

The Old Cat, Wordsley

The Old Cat is certainly old and was originally converted from a row of cottages which would have been around at the time of the English Civil War. Cavalier figures from the war have been seen in other parts of Wordsley and it is indeed a Royalist soldier in full attire who has startled staff mainly around the cellar area. Read More »

The Priest & The Prophetess: Joanna Southcott in the West Midlands

Joanna Southcott

Joanna Southcott was born in April 1750 in Taleford, and raised in the village of Gittisham in Devon, England. Read More »

The Unicorn, Wollaston

The Unicorn is a very traditional hostelry dating back to 1859. The pub has been subject to quite specific poltergeist type activity over the years which has been experienced mainly by the customers. This is put down to the presence of a previous landlord remaining attached the pub. Read More »

The Whittington Inn, Kinver

The original Whittington Inn dates back to 1310 and it comes as no surprise to discover that the present building is haunted. Prior to becoming an inn in the 18th century it was the manor house of the De Whittington family of Dick Whittingham fame. One of the ghosts seen here is that of a monk who may have hidden in one of the priest holes in the building. Read More »

Who Put Bella in the Wych Elm?

Wych Elm

On 18th April 1943 four Stourbridge teenagers, Fred Payne, Tommy Willetts, Robert Hart and Bob Farmer discovered the remains of a woman inside a hollow Wych Elm (also known as Scots (Scotch) Elm or Ulmus glabra) in Hagley Wood. It has been suggested that ritualistic magic or even wartime espionage may have been behind this murder mystery that after sixty years is still a focus of interest. Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


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