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Dinas Dinlle Iron Age Hill fort

Dinas Dinlle

This coastal Iron Age hill fort in the community of Llandwrog was built on an isolated hill of glacial drift known as Boncan Dinas, but it has now been considerably eroded by the Irish Sea and the feet of tourists. There is a popular award winning beach on the foreshore, providing views of the Northern coast of the Lleyn Peninsula and Llanddwyn Island, Anglesey. Read More »

Dinas Emrys

Dinas Emrys

The legendary stronghold of Vortigern, and the place where the young prophet Merlin revealed the fighting dragons.  In legend there are two characters associated with the same story with slight variations. One is Vortigern, the Dark Age ruler who let the Saxons into the country, and was responsible in part for their later invasions. Read More »

Dyffryn Ardudwy Cromlechs

Dyffryn Ardudwy Cromlechs

Behind the local school at Dyffryn Ardudwy and reached by a sign posted footpath two exposed cromlechs are visible amidst a field of stones. The cromlechs are about twenty feet apart and the stones that surround them mark the remains of the huge cairn that would have covered these graves that date back to the Neolithic period. Read More »

Dylife Lead Mine

Dylife was a small lead mining community which was totally abandoned when the mine closed at the end of the 1800’s. Read More »

Eglwys St. Dyfnog, Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch

Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch is a village in the Vale of Clwyd, approximately five kilometres to the South-East of Denbigh on the A525. The village church, Eglwys St. Dyfnog is a historic building, having a double nave, a 13th Century tower and an exquisite Medieval ‘Tree of Jesse’ window of superb design and glass quality. Read More »

Ellylldan

A Welsh spirit similar to the English Will o' the Wisp, it appears as a light and misleads travellers from their path.

Along with black dogs, tales of fairy lights are common throughout Britain, with a different name given to a similar phenomena. In general they are seen as malevolent, guiding lone travellers into treacherous bogs. Read More »

Ellyllon

According to 'British Goblins' (1881) by Wirt Sykes; 'The Ellyllon are the pigmy elves who haunt the groves and valleys, and correspond pretty closely with the English elves. Read More »

Fairies of Llyn Dwythwch

Children were often warned in the past about the dangers of fairies and John Rhys in his 'Celtic Folklore Welsh And Manx' (1901) vouched for an account from a lady who grew up in Cwm Brwynog thirty to forty years earlier. Read More »

Fairy Bride Of Beddgelert

In ‘The Science of Fairy Tales’ (1891), Edwin Sidney Hartland mentions the following story from Beddgelert where a stolen fairy lady ‘would only consent to be the servant of her ravisher if he could find out her name. Read More »

Fairy Gold Of Cwmglas Hollow

Cwm glas hollow

According to John Rhys in his 'Celtic Folklore Welsh And Manx' [1901] 'The following is a later tale, which Mr. Thomas Davies heard from his mother, who died in 1832:--'When she was a girl, living at Yr Hafod, Llanberis, there was a girl of her age being brought up at Cwmglas in the same parish. Read More »

Fairy Midwife Of Beddgelert

In 1891 the following folk tale appeared in 'The Science of Fairy Tales; An Enquiry Into Fairy Mythology' by Edwin Sidney Hartland. It is one of a number of stories in which human midwives are needed at fairy births. Read More »

Fetching a Halter

Llyn Gwynant

The following folk tale entitled 'Fetching a Halter' appeared in 'The Welsh Fairy Book' (1908) by W. Jenkyn Thomas 'A VERY large company came together to hold a merry evening at Bwlch Mwrchan, a farmhouse close by Lake Gwynan, in Snowdonia. It was a stormy night. The wind whistled and howled in the woods, tearing the trees like matchsticks. Read More »

Ffrith Farm Ghost

The following piece of Ghost lore, which describes poltergeist like activity was given to Elias Owen by a schoolmaster, Mr. Read More »

Ffynnon Aelrhiw

Fynnon Aelrhiw can be found in a field below the church. It is a rectangular basin in a larger surround with evidence of flat stone seats. People visited this well because its waters are meant to have a healing effect on skin diseases.

Ffynnon Arian (Silver Well)

Ffynnon Arian in the village of Mynytho on the Llyn peninsula, Gwynedd is an ancient wishing well. It is a natural spring without traces of a structure according to ‘Holy Wells of Wales’.

Ffynnon Barruc (St Barruc's Well)

St Barruc's Well is today capped and the once healing waters were diverted to make way for a Butlins holiday camp in 1965. Luckily though descriptions of the well survive. Wirt Sykes in British Goblins (1881) tells us that ‘on Barry Island, near Cardiff, is the famous well of St. Read More »

Ffynnon Dyfnog, St. Dyfnog’s Well, Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch

Situated in a copse approximately 200 yards West of Eglwys St. Dyfnog, with access via a gate in the graveyard, is Ffynnon Dyfnog, (the well of Saint Dyfnog) which is a rectangular stone bath (18 inches deep) fed by a spring. Read More »

Ffynnon Elian (St. Elian's Well)

St Elian’s Well, like most Holy Well’s was associated with having healing properties until around 1723 when it developed a reputation for being a cursing well. Thought to have sprang forth to quench the thirst of St Elian in the 6th century, the well was a source of pilgrimage for many centuries. Read More »

Ffynnon Enddwyn

Ffynnon Enddwyn is a Holy Well or Sacred Spring in the Merionethshire area of Gwynedd. The information sign at the well states:- Read More »

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Bryncroes

This well can be found on the roadside in the village of Bryncroes. It is on, what was the main pilgrim route to Bardsey Island through the Lleyn Peninsula. Bryncroes was the probably the final stop for pilgrims heading to embark from Aberdaron. Read More »

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Aberdaron

Ffynnon Fair can be found on the shore to the east of the precipitous rocks rising out of the sea known locally as ‘the wall’. This well always gives fresh water even though it is often covered over by the sea. It is said that a wish can be fulfilled by running with a mouthful of the water, three times around the quadrangle of the nearby St. Mary’s church. Read More »

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Llanbedr

Sited within the village of Llanbedr, this well is now just a dried up, empty sunken tank.

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Llwyn-y-pia

Ffynnon Fair is a holy well situated outside the village of Llwyn-y-pia. The well is the oldest recorded Christian site in the Rhondda. Some historians date the site back further, and it could be pagan in origin. The water from the well is reputed to cure ailments, especially rheumatism and poor eyesight. Rhisiart ap Rhys wrote: Read More »

Ffynnon Fyw (Well of Life)

Ffynnon Fyw is a well within a stone wall enclosure of about 7.3m squared. There is evidence of steps for bathing access. It is said the well was dedicated to Curig and tradition credits it with the belief that it restores sight to the blind and health to the sick.

Ffynnon Lloer

This mountain lake is situated within the Carneddau range in Snowdonia. The lake has an area of approximately 6 acres, is 250 metres long and is overshadowed by the peaks of Pen yr Ole Wen (the seventh highest peak in Wales (3209 feet)) and Carnedd Dafydd (the third highest peak in Wales (3425 feet)). Read More »

The Dolphin Hotel, Littlehampton

Ellie and Katie along with their staff have created a warm and friendly pub with a traditional feel and traditional values. They have worked hard to turn the Dolphin into one of the safest, cleanest and most welcoming pubs around. Between them they have nearly 30 years experience in the pub and catering trade. Read More »



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