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Ffynnon Tegla (St Tegla’s Well)

Ffynnon Tegla, (or St Tegla’s or St Tecla’s Well) can be found on private land* near the River Alyn in Llandegla (Llandegla-yn-Iâl). Read More »

Fonlief Hir Stone C

Found on the side of the road just before the road forks off to Moel Goedog hillfort, this standing stone is 1 metre tall and leans over slightly towards the West.

Fonlief Hir Stone D

This standing stone looks more like a boulder on the side of the road; it is short and squat, 0.9 metres high by 0.6 metres by 0.5 metres. It can be found between the two tracks at the junction where the road forks off to Moel Goedog hillfort.

Fort Belan

Fort Belan

Fort Belan is a Grade I listed building dating from 1775 and was built by Member of Parliament, Sir Thomas Wynn, 1st Baron Newborough (born 1736 – died 12 October 1807), as a defence for the Menai Strait against possible naval aggression during the American War of Independence. Read More »

Freni-Fawr

This mountain has long been associated with the fairies and is traditionally an entrance to the other world.

Directions: To the West of Crymych

Fynnon Galchog (The Lime Well)

This natural spring is situated on flat ground on the northern side of the headland of Great Orme. It is said that it never runs dry, even in times out drought. The water from the well is also said to be beneficial in the development of strong bones and teeth in children. There is an old story linked to this well. Read More »

Fynnon Powell (Powell’s Well)

This spring on the Great Orme is a water source that doesn’t seem to dry up, even in the driest weather. There is a story associated with the well, which tells of its mysterious formation. Many years ago, the Powell family lived in a dwelling close to where the well is now situated. Read More »

Garn Boduan Hill Fort

Garn Boduan (279 metres in height) is an Iron Age hill fort situated on a steep isolated volcanic hill to the south of Nefyn. The site was surveyed during the 1950’s, when the remains of more than one hundred and seventy round houses, (of which the remains of about one hundred are identifiable whilst on the ground) were discovered. Read More »

Garn Fadryn Hill Fort

Garn Fadryn (371 metres in height), has on its summit a Middle Iron Age hillfort covering an area of approximately twenty-six acres in total. The hill fort construction seems to have been done in stages, the first stage taking place in around 300BC enclosing about twelve acres. Read More »

Geraint The Son Of Erbin

Geraint The Son Of Erbin is a tale from the Mabinogion. The following translation by Lady Charlotte Guest was published in 1877. Read More »

Ghost Of Elizabeth Gething

The following tale concerning a haunting in Ystradgynlais was printed in British Goblins (1881) by Wirt Sykes. 'In the parish of Ystradgynlais, in Breconshire, Thomas Llewellyn, an innkeeper's son, was often troubled by the spirit of a well-dressed woman, who used to stand before him in narrow lanes, as if to bar his passage, but he always got by her, though in great alarm. Read More »

Ghosts of Neath by Robert King

Ghosts of Neath by Robert King

The history of Neath and the surrounding area dates back to Roman times, so it is little wonder that this small Welsh town is teaming with all manner of ghosts, from the long dead monks that still wander among the ruins of Neath Abbey to the voices of ghostly miners to be found deep in the mountains. Read More »

Glyndwr’s Oak

According to the National Gazetteer of Great Britain & Ireland 1868, Newcastle is described as ‘a hamlet…..where are the remains of an ancient castle and an oak said to have been planted by Owain Glyndwr.’ It is said the locals considered the oak to be possessed by evil spirits who harmed anyone that damaged the tree in any way. Read More »

Gors-Fawr Stone Circle

The circle consists of 16 standing stones with a diameter of 22.3 metres, 72 feet. Towards the Northeast of the circle are two outlying standing stones. It is not clear whether they are related to the circle and may date from an earlier or later timescale.

Directions: Off a minor road from the A478, signposted

The Grave of Gelert

Gelerts Grave

'In the 13th century Llywelyn, prince of North Wales, had a palace at Beddgelert. One day he went hunting without Gelert, "The Faithful Hound", who was unaccountably absent. On Llywelyn's return the truant, stained and smeared with blood, joyfully sprang to meet his master. Read More »

Green Bridge Cave

The cave is associated with the common legend that a fiddler (sometimes a piper in other stories) went in to the cave to play and never returned, perhaps crossing through to the fair realm. His music is still said to be heard now and again from the depths of the cave.

Directions: Pendine is reached from the A4066

Groes Las

The Groes Las settlement between Harlech and Llanfair was a domestic agricultural homestead in prehistory. It consists of the remains of a hut circle with walls approximately 3.0 metres thick and up to 1.2 metres high.

Gwern Einion

Gwern Einion is a representative cromlech, found on Gwern Einion Farm in the district of Llanfair, Meirionnydd. It has been damaged over the centuries, the burial chamber has historically been used as a shed, and the cairn has been robbed of its stone to build dry stone walls. It has actually been incorporated into a dry stone wall of the garden of a now derelict cottage on the farm. Read More »

Gwrach-y-rhybin

A hideous hag who haunts Welsh families, and is also associated with specific places. Read More »

Gwydir Castle

Gwydir Castle

Gwydir Castle is nestled in the Vale of Conwy in North Wales, and it has a long and fantastic history. The first recorded owner was Howell ap Coetmor, whose family members are recorded as having fought at the battles of Poitiers (1356), Shrewsbury (1402) and Agincourt (1415). Read More »

Gwylfa Hiraethog (a.k.a. Plas Pren)

There is an isolated ruin on the Denbigh moors which can be seen from the A543 as you head north east towards the Sportsman’s Arms. It is ‘Gwylfa Hiraethog’ (The Watchtower of Hiraethog (where Hiraethog is the Denbigh moors)), yet it is still known locally as ‘Plas Pren’ after the original wooden structure erected on the site. Read More »

Harlech and ‘The Mabinogion’

Much of the Mabinogion saga is based in the Ardudwy region of North Wales. It was from the ‘Castle Rock’ or ‘Rock of Harlech’ (where Harlech Castle now stands) that the Welsh King Bendigeidfran first saw the Irish longboats of Matholwch loom into view with their shields turned upside down as a sign of peace. Read More »

Harper's Pool

A pool in the river Teifi called 'The Pool of the Harper' is said to be haunted by the ghost of a harper, who drowned there many years ago. He makes his presence felt by wistful songs that can only be heard by certain people.

Haunted Toilets

Haunted Toilet

I came across a reference claiming that the public toilets opposite the Gwesty’r Llew Coch (Red Lion Hotel) in Dinas Mawddwy are reputedly haunted by the apparition of a silver haired old man. I have no idea what evidence this based upon, or even if there is any.

Haunted Wales: A Guide To Welsh Ghostlore by Richard Holland

Haunted Wales

The ghosts of Wales are bold and memorable, forceful in character often terrifying and sometimes even dangerous. In a new book by Richard Holland and published by The History Press you realise that Wales is a fearfully haunted place with possibly more ghosts and goblins than in England or any other country. Read More »



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