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Pen-y-Dinas Hillfort

The remains of the prehistoric, Iron Age, Pen-y-Dinas hillfort stand on a prominent peak (230 metres high), overlooking the coastal plain of Dyffryn Ardudwy. Its shape is oval, following the shape of the hill that it stands upon, and it measures approximately 60 metres by 50 metres. The wall of the hillfort is better preserved on the west side, which is where the entrance to the fort used to be. Read More »

Pen-y-Gaer Hill Fort

A Bronze Age hill fort can be found on the summit of Pen-y-Gaer, close to the village of Llanbedr-y-Cennin to the south of Conwy. The fort had quite complex defences, including three ramparts in places, and some short standing stones (a sort of chevaux de frise) to act as obstacles to both cavalry and infantry. Read More »

Penmon and Saint Seiriol

Penmon is a parish found on the south-east tip of Ynys Môn (the Isle of Anglesey). Things to see here include Penmon Priory, Saint Seiriol’s Church, Saint Seiriol’s Well, a dovecote and the Penmon crosses. Read More »

Pentre Ifan

Pentre Ifan

This is one of the most recognisable chambered cairns in Wales, with a huge capstone supported by the points of 3 upright stones. Read More »

Peredur The Son Of Evrawc

Peredur The Son Of Evrawc is one the tales in the Mabinogion. This English translation by Lady Charlotte Guest was published in 1877. Read More »

Pistyll Teilo

This pool and waterfall lie in a ravine below an old ruined curch dedicated to St Teilo (Capel Teilo). The water from the waterfall has long been thought to have healing properties, it was said to heal bruises and other ailments including rheumatism and sprains. All you had to do was hold the affected part in the main stream of icy water for a short while. Read More »

Plas-yn-Rhiw

Plas-yn-Rhiw is a 16th Century manor house which overlooks Hell's Mouth (Porth-y-Neigwl) on the Lleyn Peninsula. There has apparently been habitation at the site for over a thousand years, for there was a fortified house on the site in around 900AD built by Meirion Goch (a noble man of the minor gentry) to prevent incursions by Vikings into Porth-y-Neigwl. Read More »

Pont Aberglaslyn

Pont Aberglaslyn

Pont Aberglaslyn has a bridge with a connection to the Devil. It is very similar to other Devil and bridge related stories found throughout the British Isles. The Devil built the bridge on the understanding that he would receive the soul of the first living creature to cross over it. When the bridge was finished he went to the local inn to inform the magician Robin Ddu that it was ready. Read More »

Pont-y-Glyn Ghost

The following account of the Pont-y-Glyn Ghost is given in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales' (1887). 'There is a picturesque glen between Corwen and Cerrig-y-Drudion, down which rushes a mountain stream, and over this stream is a bridge, called Pont-y-Glyn. Read More »

Portmeirion

Portmerion

Sir Bertram Clough Williams-Ellis, CBE, MC (28 May 1883 – 9 April 1978), was an English-born Welsh architect, who created this popular tourist attraction in the style of an Italian village between 1925 and 1975. The village is a popular wedding venue and hotel, with each cottage and building being a room or suite. Read More »

Powis Castle

Powis Castle dates back to the 13th century when it was a medieval stronghold for the Welsh princes of Powys. It is now the ancestral home for the Earls of Powis and has been continuously lived in for over seven hundred years. It is only to be expected that a castle with such a long history would have acquired a few ghosts over the years.

The Ghosts: Read More »

Pwyll, Lord of Dyfed

The story of Pwyll is found in the Mabinogion, a collection of old Welsh stories translated by Lady Charlotte Guest, and published in 1849. It describes how Pwyll the Lord of Dyfed meets the underworld king Arawn and how the two become close allies. Read More »

Queens Head Inn

Located at number 1 St. James Street, Monmouth, is the Queens Head Inn. It is a Grade II listed building which dates back the 16th Century. It has previously been known as the ‘Queens Head Hotel’ and the ‘Queens Head’. Read More »

Queen’s Hotel, Blaenau Ffestiniog

Queen’s Hotel, Blaenau Ffestiniog

The Queen’s Hotel is situated next to the railway station, on the High Street of the historical slate mining town of Blaenau Ffestiniog. It was built in around 1850 and has been a focal point for locals and tourists to the area for many years. In the 1990’s the hotel was closed for four years, modernised whilst retaining its Victorian character, and reopened. Read More »

Rhyd-y-Cae Bridge, Pentrefoelas

There is a legend associated with Rhyd-y-Cae Bridge where a local man was enticed into a game of cards with Satan himself. The following account of the story appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887). Read More »

Richard The Tailor Of Langattock Crickhowell

The town of Crickhowell and the village of Langattock face each other over the River Usk. Wirt Sykes in his ‘British Goblins’ (1881) recounts the following story of a gentleman called Walter Jones being taught a lesson by a local inn keeper thought to dabble in witchcraft. Read More »

River Artro

Taliesin

Whilst reading part of Lewis’s Topographical Dictionary of Wales (1849), I came across a link between the River Artro and Taliesin. Read More »

River Honddu Water Horse

The River Honddu (Afon Honddu) runs through the Black Mountains in the Brecon Beacons starting at the Vale of Ewyas and said, according to folklore, to be the home of a small grey Ceffyl-dwr (a welsh water horse similar to a Kelpie). Read More »

River Monnow Bridge, Kentchurch

In 'The Folk-Lore of Herefordshire' (1912), Ella Mary Leather gave the following account of a bridge associated with the Devil. This bridge crosses the River Monnow which separates Gwent from Herefordshire. Read More »

River Taff Worm

A worm type of dragon was supposed to live at the bottom of a whirlpool in the River Taff. It was said to drown people and suck down their bodies to eat.

The above was taken from an article by Richard Freeman.

Roch Castle

According to folklore Adam De La Roche, a Norman landowner was told by a local wise woman that he would die by the bite of an adder, but he could escape the prophesy if he managed to get through a predicted year in safety. He built Roch Castle (which dates from the 13th century) on the volcanic outcrop so that it was far above the surrounding landscape. Read More »

Roman Steps

On a popular walking route for ramblers and hikers, from Cwm Bychan through Bwlch Tyddiad and around Rhinog Fawr, you will encounter the Roman Steps. These steps made in the hills are commonly said to have been constructed by the Romans to facilitate the ascent and descent of their sentries to and from the pass of Bwlch Tyddiad (1,294 ft and 7.5 miles out of Llanbedr). Read More »

Rowli Pugh and the Ellyll

Wirt Sykes gave the following Glamorganshire folktale in his 'British Goblins' (1881). 'On a certain farm in Glamorganshire lived Rowli Pugh, who was known far and wide for his evil luck. Read More »

Royal Goat Hotel, Beddgelert

Royal Goat Hotel

The Royal Goat Hotel is linked to stories suggesting a haunting, though I don’t know of any actual haunting type occurrences that have happened there. The stories relate to David Pritchard, the first landlord of the Royal Goat Hotel and the man generally thought responsible for the Grave of Gelert. Read More »

Ruthin Castle

Castle Entrance

Before I begin I would like to say that I spent my honeymoon at Ruthin Castle, and found the accommodation and service exemplary. I would recommend staying in the castle to anybody, and I cannot overstate how much I enjoyed the Medieval Banquet which they host on a regular basis. Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


Rooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfastRooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfast



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