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Bodelwyddan Castle

Bodelwyddan Castle is a popular tourist attraction and wedding venue set in 260 acres of parkland. It was originally built as a manor house by the Humphreys family of Anglesey in the region of 1460, but it’s most famous relationship is a 200 year history with the Williams family from circa 1690 onwards. Read More »

Cader Bronwen UFO

On 23rd January 1974 around 8.30pm something is supposed to have crashed into the side of Cader Bronwen in Clwyd in Wales. The police sealed off the general area and military helicopters were also witnessed in the location. The event has been subject to much speculation.

Cefn Cave Crocodile

Crocodile

There is a tradition that a local man found a crocodile in Cefn Caves, which was a popular visitor attraction. This supposedly occurred near the end of the nineteenth century (approx 1870) and upon discovering the creature he managed to kill it. Read More »

Eglwys St. Dyfnog, Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch

Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch is a village in the Vale of Clwyd, approximately five kilometres to the South-East of Denbigh on the A525. The village church, Eglwys St. Dyfnog is a historic building, having a double nave, a 13th Century tower and an exquisite Medieval ‘Tree of Jesse’ window of superb design and glass quality. Read More »

Ellyllon

According to 'British Goblins' (1881) by Wirt Sykes; 'The Ellyllon are the pigmy elves who haunt the groves and valleys, and correspond pretty closely with the English elves. Read More »

Ffrith Farm Ghost

The following piece of Ghost lore, which describes poltergeist like activity was given to Elias Owen by a schoolmaster, Mr. Read More »

Ffynnon Dyfnog, St. Dyfnog’s Well, Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch

Situated in a copse approximately 200 yards West of Eglwys St. Dyfnog, with access via a gate in the graveyard, is Ffynnon Dyfnog, (the well of Saint Dyfnog) which is a rectangular stone bath (18 inches deep) fed by a spring. Read More »

Ffynnon Elian (St. Elian's Well)

St Elian’s Well, like most Holy Well’s was associated with having healing properties until around 1723 when it developed a reputation for being a cursing well. Thought to have sprang forth to quench the thirst of St Elian in the 6th century, the well was a source of pilgrimage for many centuries. Read More »

Ffynnon Tegla (St Tegla’s Well)

Ffynnon Tegla, (or St Tegla’s or St Tecla’s Well) can be found on private land* near the River Alyn in Llandegla (Llandegla-yn-Iâl). Read More »

Gwylfa Hiraethog (a.k.a. Plas Pren)

There is an isolated ruin on the Denbigh moors which can be seen from the A543 as you head north east towards the Sportsman’s Arms. It is ‘Gwylfa Hiraethog’ (The Watchtower of Hiraethog (where Hiraethog is the Denbigh moors)), yet it is still known locally as ‘Plas Pren’ after the original wooden structure erected on the site. Read More »

Haunted Wales: A Guide To Welsh Ghostlore by Richard Holland

Haunted Wales

The ghosts of Wales are bold and memorable, forceful in character often terrifying and sometimes even dangerous. In a new book by Richard Holland and published by The History Press you realise that Wales is a fearfully haunted place with possibly more ghosts and goblins than in England or any other country. Read More »

Holy Well of St Winifred

St Winifride's Holy Well

The healing waters of St Winifred’s (Winifride) Holy Well have attracted pilgrims for over 1300 years and the crypt in which the well lies was stacked with crutches left by the cured invalids until some time in the 1960’s, though can still be seen on display. Read More »

Llangar Church, Corwen

The white washed Llangar Church can be found about a mile from Corwen and can be dated from the late 13th century though it could possibly be as old as the 11th century. Its original name of 'Llan Garw Gwyn' (The Church of The White Deer) possibly alludes to a legend dating back its initial erection. Read More »

Llindir Inn, Henllan

Llindir Inn, Henllan,Clwyd

The thatched Grade II listed Llindir Inn dates from 1229 and is certainly one of the oldest pubs in Wales. It is reputed to be haunted by a ghost thought to be named Sylvia, the wife of a sailor who strangled her after finding her in the arms of another man whilst on unexpected shore leave. Read More »

Maen Huail

Maen Huail

Situated outside Exmewe House (currently Barclays Bank) in Ruthin, is a large boulder that was reputedly used by King Arthur as a chopping block when he killed a love rival. The story states that King Arthur and Huail (son of Caw) once fought over the favours of a lady. Read More »

Nant y Ffrith Phantom Army

The village of Bwlchgwyn is the highest in Wales and it was near here in the Nant y Ffrith Valley that a phantom army was reported in September 1602 by Robert Parry. Read More »

Pont-y-Glyn Ghost

The following account of the Pont-y-Glyn Ghost is given in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales' (1887). 'There is a picturesque glen between Corwen and Cerrig-y-Drudion, down which rushes a mountain stream, and over this stream is a bridge, called Pont-y-Glyn. Read More »

Ruthin Castle

Castle Entrance

Before I begin I would like to say that I spent my honeymoon at Ruthin Castle, and found the accommodation and service exemplary. I would recommend staying in the castle to anybody, and I cannot overstate how much I enjoyed the Medieval Banquet which they host on a regular basis. Read More »

Satan Appearing As A Lovely Maiden

A young man who was walking from Dyserth to Rhyl was overtaken by a lovely young lady dressed in white. She invited conversation, and they walked together awhile talking kindly, but, when they came opposite a pool on the road side she disappeared, in the form of a ball of fire, into the water. All that has reached our days, in corroboration of this tale, is the small pool. Read More »

Satan Frightening A Man For Gathering Nuts On Sunday

In his 'Welsh-folklore' (1887) Elias Owen tells the following tale related to him by Rev. W. E. Jones, rector of Bylchau, near Denbigh:— Read More »

Satan Playing Cards At A Merry Meeting

It was formerly a general custom in Wales for young lads and lasses to meet and spend a pleasant evening together in various farmhouses. Many kinds of amusements, such as dancing, singing, and card playing, were resorted to, while away the time. The Rev. Read More »

Satan Taking Possession Of A Man Who Fished On Sunday

The following tale is in its main features still current in Cynwyd, a village about two miles from Corwen. The first reference to the story that I am acquainted with appeared in an essay sent in to a local Eisteddfod in 1863. The story is thus related in this essay:— Read More »

Sing Sorrow Sorrow edited by Gwen Davies

Sing Sorrow Sorrow

‘Sing Sorrow Sorrow is a chilling collection of supernatural myth and otherworldly horror stories from some of Wales' most exciting new and established authors. Read More »

St Cynfarch and St Mary Church, Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd

According to Elias Owen in his 'Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales' (1887) 'For the following legend, I am indebted to Mr. R. Prys Jones, who resided for several years in the parish of Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd. In answer to a letter from me respecting mysterious removal of churches, Mr. Read More »

St David's Church (aka Leicester's Church), Denbigh

St David's or Leicester's Church in Denbigh dates from 1578 – 1579. Intended to be a new Cathedral Church for the St Asaph dioceses it is thought to have been the largest church built in the Elizabethan Age, or would have been if it ad been completed. Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


Rooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfastRooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfast



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