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St Digain's Church, Llangernyw

St Digain's Church in Llangerny has a unique living ancient monument, a male yew tree that is possibly aged 4000 to 5000 years making it one of the oldest living organisms in the world. There is also a tradition associated with the church and All Hallows Eve when a spirit would reputedly announce the names of those about to die from the altar. Read More »

St Giles' Church In Wales, Wrexham

One of the Seven Wonders of Wales, St Giles’ Church dates from the 16th century and has an interesting piece of folklore attached to it. Alfred. Read More »

St. Cynhafal's Well, Llangynhafal

According Wirt Sykes in ‘British Goblins’ (1881), ‘St. Cynhafal's well, on a hillside in Llangynhafal parish, Denbighshire, is one of those curing wells in which pins are thrown. Its specialty is warts. To exorcise your wart you stick a pin in it and then throw the pin into this well; the wart soon vanishes. Read More »

The Bull Hotel, Abergele

The Bull Hotel on Chapel Street Abergele has an interesting history, and is also alleged to be haunted. In 1848, Jane Roberts owned the building and allowed the Mormon preacher John Parry Junior to preach from the house. Read More »

The Devil Appearing To A Dissenting Minister At Denbigh

“The Rev. Mr. Thomas Baddy, who lived in Denbigh Town, and was a Dissenting Minister in that place, went into his study one night, and while he was reading or writing, he heard some one behind him laughing and grinning at him, which made him stop a little—as well indeed it might. Read More »

The Ghost of Dafydd Salusbury

The village of Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch, just off the A525 in Denbighshire has a rich history, and is also reputedly haunted. It is said that the ghost of Dafydd Salusbury has been seen galloping around the parish on a white horse at Midnight, and making terrible groaning noises. Salusbury was of local nobility, and was not liked by the local people, for his wicked ways.

The Llandegla Spirit

The parish church of Llandegla is dedicated to St Tecla of Iconium (modern day Konya in Turkey) and though the original building dated from 1273, it was rebuilt in 1866 by Lady Margaret Willoughby de Broke. There is a folk-tale and tradition concerning the haunting and subsequent exorcism of the rectory. Read More »

The Owain Glyndwr Hotel, Corwen

Owain Glyndwr

Named after Owain Glyndwr the great Welsh hero who had strong connections with Corwen, this is probably one of the oldest hotel buildings in Wales dating back to 1329. The building was originally a monastery attached to the church behind and later a coaching inn. Read More »

The Thirteen Treasures of the Island of Britain

These treasures are ancient magical items of Welsh tradition that are mentioned in 15th and 16th Century manuscripts. Most of the treasures are from and in ‘The North’ of the Island of Britain. Read More »

The Undreamed Region: Barrows In Folklore & Archaeology

Hills, mounds and burial sites. Places which have a timeless allure. Such places can be seen and regarded as mythically liminal, a place that it is not a place. A place outside of time. A place where the living freely walk with the dead. Barrows are just such places. Read More »

Ty Felin Ghost

Elias Owen gives the following account of a reputed haunting in his 'Welsh Folk-lore' (1887). It would be interesting to know whether any reports of an apparition are still made from this area. Read More »

Ty-Mawr Ghost, Bryneglwys

In 'Welsh Folk-lore' (1887), Elias Owen recounts a conversation concerning a ghost he had with Mr. Read More »



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