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Nanteos Mansion

Nanteos means the valley of the nightingale, and is a Georgian mansion house built for Thomas Powell in 1739. Read More »

Ogaf Myrddin

Ogaf Myrddin means Merlin's Cave, and this is one of the locations where he is said to sleep awaiting his release. The cave is hidden behind a waterfall.

Directions: Northwest of Brechfa

Pentre Ifan

Pentre Ifan

This is one of the most recognisable chambered cairns in Wales, with a huge capstone supported by the points of 3 upright stones. Read More »

Pistyll Teilo

This pool and waterfall lie in a ravine below an old ruined curch dedicated to St Teilo (Capel Teilo). The water from the waterfall has long been thought to have healing properties, it was said to heal bruises and other ailments including rheumatism and sprains. All you had to do was hold the affected part in the main stream of icy water for a short while. Read More »

Pwyll, Lord of Dyfed

The story of Pwyll is found in the Mabinogion, a collection of old Welsh stories translated by Lady Charlotte Guest, and published in 1849. It describes how Pwyll the Lord of Dyfed meets the underworld king Arawn and how the two become close allies. Read More »

Roch Castle

According to folklore Adam De La Roche, a Norman landowner was told by a local wise woman that he would die by the bite of an adder, but he could escape the prophesy if he managed to get through a predicted year in safety. He built Roch Castle (which dates from the 13th century) on the volcanic outcrop so that it was far above the surrounding landscape. Read More »

Sarn Gynfelyn

Sarn Cynfelin (Saint Cynfelyn’s Causeway) is the southern most of the three Cardigan Bay sarnau, and begins just below the farmhouse at Wallog, situated on the cliffs between Borth and Clarach, and it extends for fourteen kilometres offshore into Cardigan Bay. Approximately half way along its length, it is bisected by a channel which is about five metres deep. Read More »

Satan At Work Near Llanfihangel-y-Creuddyn

Elias Owen gives the following account of a series of disturbing experiences that befell a Sabbath breaker in his 1887 book ‘ Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales’. The account relates to the experiences of one William Davies and was given to Owen by the late Rev. J. L. Read More »

Sing Sorrow Sorrow edited by Gwen Davies

Sing Sorrow Sorrow

‘Sing Sorrow Sorrow is a chilling collection of supernatural myth and otherworldly horror stories from some of Wales' most exciting new and established authors. Read More »

Sir David Llwyd of Yspythi Ystwyth

The village of Ysbyty Ystwyth is thought to have been the property of the Knights Hospitallier ( Order of the Knights of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem) and also, maybe the home of one of Wales infamous magicians. Read More »

St Canna's Church, Llangan

The current church is thought to have been on the site of the original chapel founded by St Canna. It was rebuilt in 1820, but many references from the late 19th century refer to it as being dilapidated and unused. I am unsure of its recent history at the moment but what I am interested in is a legend attached to its construction. Read More »

St Canna's Stone (aka St Canna's Chair) & Fynnon Ganna (Canna's Holy Well)

St Canna (Born 510AD) founded churches at both Llangan and Llanganna, though she is thought to have maintained her residence at Llangan (Llang-gan) in Carmarthenshire (not to be confused with Llangan in the Vale of Glamorgan). It is here in Llangan that we find her church and records of a holy well and a cubical shaped stone inscribed with the name 'Carina' that were associated with the saint. Read More »

St Govan's Chapel

This tiny chapel hidden in a deep ravine in the rocks dates from the thirteenth century. There may have been a chapel or religious structure here in the fifth century making it one of the earliest places of Christian worship. It has been suggested that the chapel was part of a larger Hermitage but its history is unclear. Read More »

St Non's Chapel and St David's Peninsula

St David's Peninsula is supposedly the landing place of Twrch Trwyth, the magical boar told in the story of Culhwch and Olwen in the Mabinogion, King Arthur features heavily in the story. It is also the place where St Patrick is said to have sailed for Ireland to convert them to Christianity. Read More »

Strata Florida Abbey

The abbey was founded in early part of the 13th century by the Cistercian monks, and was one of the grandest in Wales at its height. It was seen as a centre of education and political activity. The abbey was destroyed during the reformation. Read More »

The A44 WWII Phantom Bomber

A WWII phantom bomber has been seen by independent witnesses on separate occasions whilst driving on the A44, probably in the vicinity of Eisteddfa Gurig Farm at the base of Pumlumon 2,467ft. The aircraft flies silently and low to the ground as if it is going to crash into a hill. Read More »

The Aberystwyth Mermaid

The story of the Aberystwyth Mermaid was published after 1826, written in Welsh. The general abbreviated story is outlined below. Read More »

The Beast of Bont

Responsible for killing around fifty sheep centred on the village of Pontrhydfendigaid in 1995, the ‘Beast of Bont’ is the most feared mysterious predator in Wales. Expert vets that examined the carcasses said the animal that caused the damage was more powerful than a fox or dog. Many people believe the beast to be a large cat, such as a puma or leopard. Read More »

The Boar’s Head

Boars Head Hotel

The Boar’s Head pub on Queen’s Road in Aberystwyth, is a derelict building at the time of writing, but is probably going to be converted into flats in the future, now the squatters have been evicted. Read More »

The Devils Bridge

Devils Bridge

There are three bridges over this part of the Mynach Gorge, each one built successively over the others, as they needed to be improved for traffic. The lowest of the bridges dating from the 11th century is the original one and is associated with a Devil legend that is common in Britain with minor variations from place to place. Read More »

The Dylan Thomas Boat House

The Dylan Thomas Boat House is found in Laugharne, set at the foot of a cliff overlooking the Tâf estuary. Dylan Marlais Thomas (Born 27 October 1914 – Died 9 November 1953) lived in the house between 1949 and 1953 with his family. It is now a shrine to poet, and a popular tourist attraction for Carmarthenshire County Council receiving around 15,000 visitors a year. Read More »

The Promenade Ghosts

Aberystwyth Promenade

In the 1960′s a young couple tragically drowned after becoming trapped by the high tide and rocks at the end of the promenade at the foot of Constitution Hill in Aberystwyth. The following account is from Phil Bishop and his wife who saw what might have been the ghosts of this couple whilst they were holidaying in Aberystwyth during 1971. Read More »

The Thirteen Treasures of the Island of Britain

These treasures are ancient magical items of Welsh tradition that are mentioned in 15th and 16th Century manuscripts. Most of the treasures are from and in ‘The North’ of the Island of Britain. Read More »

The Undreamed Region: Barrows In Folklore & Archaeology

Hills, mounds and burial sites. Places which have a timeless allure. Such places can be seen and regarded as mythically liminal, a place that it is not a place. A place outside of time. A place where the living freely walk with the dead. Barrows are just such places. Read More »

Trefal Stone

The following article by Nick Dermody about the Trefal Stone appeared on the BBC Wales website on 24 May 2012.

'Archaeologists are to exhume and analyse human bones found under a prehistoric monument only recently identified as a burial site cap. Read More »



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