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Llyn Ogwen

Llyn Ogwen

Four miles North from Capel Curig along the A5; and at 310 metres above sea level you’ll find Llyn Ogwen covering an area of 78 acres. Its ancient name was reportedly Ogfanw (young pig); and it is one of the shallowest lakes in North Wales, averaging 6 feet, and only being 10 feet at its deepest point. Read More »

Llyn-y-Dywarchen

Llyn Y Dywarchen

This is a privately owned lake beside the B4418 which has a rather complex shape and a small island in the centre, which is not uncommon in highly glaciated areas. There is a curious story attached to this lake. Once upon a time Llyn-y-Dywarchen had an additional floating island. Read More »

Llyn-yr-Afanc (The Beaver Pool)

The Beaver Pool can be found about a mile to the south of Betws-y-Coed where the A470 turns at the Fairy Glen to cross the Beaver Bridge. Legend has it, that this is the pool that the Betws-y-Coed Afangc once lived and terrorised the locals. Read More »

Llys Helig

This is another sunken palace / drowned town legend from north Wales. As the story goes, Llys Helig was the palace of Helig ap Glannog, and it once stood somewhere in the area that Conwy Bay is today. It is said to have been inundated by a great flood sometime in the 6th Century. There are several different recounts of the legend, but the one below is a popular one. Read More »

Maentwrog (Twrog’s Stone)

Maentwrog (Twrog’s Stone)

Lying in the Vale of Ffestiniog, alongside the river Dwyryd, is the village of Maentwrog. There is a legend that a giant called Twrog (who died in the year AD610) hurled a stone from a hill top, down into the village and destroyed a pagan altar. Read More »

Maes Artro Heritage Museum, now Artro Lodges

The Maes Artro Heritage Museum is no longer open to the public; it closed down several years ago. There is now a holiday park on the site, although some of the museum buildings are currently still standing, although derelict. Historically, the site was connected with RAF Llanbedr (1941- 2004). It served as a training camp (RAF's No. Read More »

Mawddach Sea Monster

Barmouth Estuary

During the last twentieth century there have been a few experiences that have led to suggestions that the Mawddach Estuary at Barmouth may be the home of a sea monster. According to Mysterious Wales by Chris Barber a local woman claimed to have found four large footprints in the sand, described as being ‘as big as an elephant’s’. Read More »

Meini Hirion (Llanbedr Standing Stones)

Llanbedr Stones

The Meini Hirion or ‘long stones’ are a pair of standing stones situated in Llanbedr. They are in a livestock field on the left hand side of the village as you travel north towards Pen-sarn. The field regularly floods when there is a high tide, and the stones are partially obscured by a large tree which grows close by them. Read More »

Moel Faner Hillfort

With an entrance facing towards the north-east, this oval shaped hillfort is probably from the Iron Age. It lies at a height of 950 feet, on a promontory of a hill overlooking the Nannau estate and the Mawddach valley. The fort was small, being about 0.5 acres and the single wall enclosing the fort would have been about six feet high, but it is now quite trampled. Read More »

Moel Goedog Hillfort

In a commanding position situated on the hills above Harlech are the remains of the suspected late Bronze Age hillfort known as Moel Goedog. It is adjacent to the prehistoric track way of Fonlief Hir, which is indicated by a series of standing stones along the route. Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 1

Moel Goedog 1 lies just of the track, close to Moel Goedog hillfort and the two Moel Goedog ring cairns, East and Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 2

This standing stone is just beside the track, being about 60 metres from Moel Goedog 3 and near to the Moel Goedog hillfort. Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 3

This standing stone is close to Moel Goedog hillfort, and it is about 60 metres from Moel Goedog 2. Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 6 a.k.a. Fonlief Hir Stone E

Moel Goedog 6 is a wedged shaped standing stone that has a notch in its upper surface. It stands 0.8 metres high and is part of the Fonlief Hir ancient Track way.

Moel Goedog, East (Ring Cairn)

This is the remains of the easterly ring cairn (a Neolithic burial covered with stones); one of a pair situated close together in the Moel Goedog ancient monument complex situated the hills above Harlech close to Moel Goedog hillfort.

Moel Goedog, West (Ring Cairn)

This is the remains of the westerly ring cairn (a Neolithic burial covered with stones); one of a pair situated close together in the Moel Goedog ancient monument complex situated the hills above Harlech close to Moel Goedog hillfort.

Moel Offrwm (Lower Hillfort)

Being only 0.5 acres in area, and built on a small prominent rock, this fort did not have much room for a settlement, but due to its natural defences and its high wall, it would have been easy to defend. Evidence has been found for a single six metre diameter roundhouse within the fort, so it would only have housed a handful of people. Read More »

Moel Offrwm (Upper Hillfort)

Within the Nannau estate near Llanfachreth, there are three hillforts in quite close proximity, Moel Offrwm (Upper fort), Moel Offrwm (Lower fort) and Moel Faner. Read More »

Moel-y-Sensigl [a.k.a. Moel Goedog Stone 7 & Fonlief Hir Stone A]

This standing stone found close to Merthyr Farm, Harlech, is the tallest and most prominent of the five stones denoting the supposed prehistoric track way known as Fonlief Hir. The stone stands just over six feet tall and can be seen over a gate in the stone farm wall beside the road.

More Anglesey Ghosts by Bunty Austin

More Anglesey Ghosts

More Anglesey Ghosts is the follow up to Buty Austin's book, Haunted Anglesey, and touchingly dedicated to her late husband Walt. In this book Bunty has retuned to her favourite stomping ground and brings to her readers a new collection of ghostly sightings and paranormal encounters set to keep you up at night. Read More »

Mynydd y Fedw

In 'Celtic Folklore Welsh And Manx' (1901), John Rhys recounted the following folktale originally passed down Siân Dafydd of Helfa Fawr, and Mari Domos Siôn of Tyn Gadlas, Llanberis who would probably have been born around 1770. Read More »

Pen Dinas Hill Fort, Great Orme

There was once an Iron Age hill fort at this area called Pen Dinas on the Great Orme. Archaeologists have identified the remains of more than fifty hut circles and some degraded defensive ramparts. Pen Dinas is subsidiary peak that juts out of the Great Orme, and it is a good defensive location for a settlement. Read More »

Pen Llystyn Roman Fort

There used to be a Roman military settlement just north of where the old Roman road changes direction at Bryncir, (the now A487 was once the Roman military road between the forts at Caernarfon (Segontium) and Trawsfynyedd (Heriri Mons, a.k.a. Read More »

Pen-y-Dinas Hillfort

The remains of the prehistoric, Iron Age, Pen-y-Dinas hillfort stand on a prominent peak (230 metres high), overlooking the coastal plain of Dyffryn Ardudwy. Its shape is oval, following the shape of the hill that it stands upon, and it measures approximately 60 metres by 50 metres. The wall of the hillfort is better preserved on the west side, which is where the entrance to the fort used to be. Read More »

Pen-y-Gaer Hill Fort

A Bronze Age hill fort can be found on the summit of Pen-y-Gaer, close to the village of Llanbedr-y-Cennin to the south of Conwy. The fort had quite complex defences, including three ramparts in places, and some short standing stones (a sort of chevaux de frise) to act as obstacles to both cavalry and infantry. Read More »



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