You are hereGwynedd

Gwynedd


Penmon and Saint Seiriol

Penmon is a parish found on the south-east tip of Ynys Môn (the Isle of Anglesey). Things to see here include Penmon Priory, Saint Seiriol’s Church, Saint Seiriol’s Well, a dovecote and the Penmon crosses. Read More »

Plas-yn-Rhiw

Plas-yn-Rhiw is a 16th Century manor house which overlooks Hell's Mouth (Porth-y-Neigwl) on the Lleyn Peninsula. There has apparently been habitation at the site for over a thousand years, for there was a fortified house on the site in around 900AD built by Meirion Goch (a noble man of the minor gentry) to prevent incursions by Vikings into Porth-y-Neigwl. Read More »

Pont Aberglaslyn

Pont Aberglaslyn

Pont Aberglaslyn has a bridge with a connection to the Devil. It is very similar to other Devil and bridge related stories found throughout the British Isles. The Devil built the bridge on the understanding that he would receive the soul of the first living creature to cross over it. When the bridge was finished he went to the local inn to inform the magician Robin Ddu that it was ready. Read More »

Portmeirion

Portmerion

Sir Bertram Clough Williams-Ellis, CBE, MC (28 May 1883 – 9 April 1978), was an English-born Welsh architect, who created this popular tourist attraction in the style of an Italian village between 1925 and 1975. The village is a popular wedding venue and hotel, with each cottage and building being a room or suite. Read More »

Queen’s Hotel, Blaenau Ffestiniog

Queen’s Hotel, Blaenau Ffestiniog

The Queen’s Hotel is situated next to the railway station, on the High Street of the historical slate mining town of Blaenau Ffestiniog. It was built in around 1850 and has been a focal point for locals and tourists to the area for many years. In the 1990’s the hotel was closed for four years, modernised whilst retaining its Victorian character, and reopened. Read More »

Rhyd-y-Cae Bridge, Pentrefoelas

There is a legend associated with Rhyd-y-Cae Bridge where a local man was enticed into a game of cards with Satan himself. The following account of the story appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887). Read More »

River Artro

Taliesin

Whilst reading part of Lewis’s Topographical Dictionary of Wales (1849), I came across a link between the River Artro and Taliesin. Read More »

Roman Steps

On a popular walking route for ramblers and hikers, from Cwm Bychan through Bwlch Tyddiad and around Rhinog Fawr, you will encounter the Roman Steps. These steps made in the hills are commonly said to have been constructed by the Romans to facilitate the ascent and descent of their sentries to and from the pass of Bwlch Tyddiad (1,294 ft and 7.5 miles out of Llanbedr). Read More »

Royal Goat Hotel, Beddgelert

Royal Goat Hotel

The Royal Goat Hotel is linked to stories suggesting a haunting, though I don’t know of any actual haunting type occurrences that have happened there. The stories relate to David Pritchard, the first landlord of the Royal Goat Hotel and the man generally thought responsible for the Grave of Gelert. Read More »

Saint Cybi and Saint Cybi’s Church (Holyhead)

Saint Cybi was said to be the cousin of Saint David (~500- 1st March 589AD, there is uncertainty to the dates), the Patron Saint of Wales, and the friend of Saint Seiriol who founded his cell at Penmon on Ynys Môn (Anglesey) with whom he would regularly meet. Read More »

Saint Cybi’s Holy Well

Well Buildings

Saint Cybi’s Holy Well at Llangybi in North Wales is one of those mysterious and difficult to find places which turn out to be well worth the effort. Certain places have an almost otherworldly atmosphere about them and Saint Cybi’s Well is certainly one of these. Read More »

Saint Mary’s (and Saint Bodfan’s) Church, Llanaber

Llanaber Church

Almost two miles north of Barmouth on the A496 is the parish of Llanaber, and the not to be missed, Llanaber church. It dates from the early 13th Century, and is dedicated to St. Bodfan with a later dedication to the Virgin Mary. Read More »

Saint Tanwg’s Church

The intriguing Saint Tanwg’s Church is situated in the sand dunes at Llandanwg, which is at the mouth of the River Artro, opposite to Mochras (Shell Island). Read More »

Sarn Badrig

Sarn Badrig, also known as St. Patrick's Causeway, starts from Mochras point on Shell Island (or Mochras) and extends out in to Cardigan Bay for about twenty-four kilometres (fourteen miles, some nine of which are exposed at neap tides). It is one of three such ridges of rock and shingle that can be found on this west Welsh coast. Read More »

Sarn-y-Bwlch

Sarn-y-Bwlch (Causeway of the Pass) is the middle of the three Cardigan Bay sarnau. It is the smallest of the three sarns, and it extends for about 6 kilometres offshore out from Pen Bwlch point at Tywyn, in a south westerly direction. Its charted depth is as shallow as 0.3 metres (Admiralty chart 1972). Read More »

Satan Playing Cards

The following story concerning the Devil playing cards appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887)'. 'A good many years ago I travelled from Pentrevoelas to Yspytty in company with Mr. Read More »

Satan Seen Lying Right Across A Road

The following story appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887). 'Near Pentrevoelas lived a man called John Ty’nllidiart, who was in the habit of taking, yearly, cattle from the uplands in his neighbourhood, to be wintered in the Vale of Clwyd. Read More »

Segontium Roman Fort

Segontium Roman Fort

This is the remains of a Roman auxiliary fort, one of the largest, and last to be abandoned by the Romans in North Wales. It was built by Gnaeus Julius Agricola in around 77 AD after his victory over the native tribe, the Ordovices. Read More »

Sing Sorrow Sorrow edited by Gwen Davies

Sing Sorrow Sorrow

‘Sing Sorrow Sorrow is a chilling collection of supernatural myth and otherworldly horror stories from some of Wales' most exciting new and established authors. Read More »

The Smallest House In Britain

Quay House

The smallest house in Great Britain can be found on the quayside at Conwy and is known as Quay House. This tiny dwelling dates from the sixteenth century and was lived in continually until 1900 when it was deemed by the local authority to be unsuitable for human habitation. Read More »

Snowdon

Snowdon 1

Standing 3650 ft above sea level, Snowdon is the highest peak in Wales, second highest mountain in Britain and is also probably the busiest due to it popularity with hillwalkers. Read More »

South Stack Lighthouse

It was the 9th February 1809 when the oil lamps in the newly built South Stack Lighthouse were first lit to provide a beacon to the east bound shipping on the dangerous sea passage between Dublin, Holyhead and Liverpool. The building stands 28 metres (ninety-one feet) tall, and can be seen for about twenty-eight miles, depending on the height of the observer above sea level on the vessel. Read More »

Spirit of Llyn-Nad-y-Forwyn

The following folk tale of a haunting beside the River Colwyn in Beddgelert was taken from Elias Owen's Welsh Folk-Lore (1896). 'It is said that a young man was about to marry a young girl, and on the evening before the wedding they were rambling along the water's side together, but the man was false, and loved another better than the woman whom he was about to wed. Read More »

St Aelhaearn’s Church

St Aelhaearn’s Church

Located in the village of Llanaelhaearn, the church is named after Aelhaearn, a disciple of Saint Beuno who travelled to the area in the 5th and 6th Centuries. In Wales this period was known as the ‘Age of Saints’ but in England, as ‘The Dark Ages’. Read More »

St Aelhaearn’s Well

St Aelhaearn’s Well

This well can be found on the outskirts of the village of Llanaelhaearn, on the left hand side of the road as you ascend the (B4417) out of the village. It is enclosed in a locked stone structure which was constructed in 1900, and it is in front of a house called Bryn Iddon. Read More »



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site