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Auld 'Opper Of Raydale House

Raydale House is a 17th century building that has been largely rebuilt during the 19th century and, it was during the 19th century that it acquired a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

Bainbridge

Associated with a 700 year old tradition of horn blowing. The horn was sounded every night during the autumn and winter months. It was once a guide to travellers, who may have become lost in the great forests that surrounded the area.

Directions: Off the A684 to the East of Hawes. Or just listen for the horn.

Burning of the Bartle, West Witton

Famous for the Burning of the Bartle festival, when an effigy of St Bartholomew is burned in the town. The festival takes place on the nearest Saturday to the 24th of August. Read More »

Giggleswick

The ebbing and flowing well: legend tells how a nymph was being chased by a satyr who was overcome with lust. The nymph prayed to the gods and was saved by being turned into a well - famous for healing. The only thing that remained of the nymph was her eternal breath that causes the well to ebb and flow like the tides. Read More »

Holy Trinity Church, Coverham

Coverham Church

This church dates from the 13th century. Read More »

Ivelet Bridge Black Dog

The single span Ivelet Bridge over the River Swale dates from 1687 and was an important crossing point on the 16 mile Corpse Way from Muker to the Churchyard at Grinton, which was once the only consecrated burial ground in the dale. Read More »

Rawthey Bridge Stone Circle

Stones used in the construction of the 1822 Rawthey Bridge over which the A683 passes were plundered from a stone circle described in The History and Antiquities of the Counties of Westmorland and Cumberland, 1777 by J Nicolson & R Burn. “A circle of large stones, supposed to be a monument of druid worship”. According to Rev. Read More »

Semer Water

Associated with a legend about a vanished town, drowned because of its indifference to a beggar. One day a beggar came to the proud and rich town asking for shelter, but was turned away at every door. He eventually came to a cottage on a hill at the edge of the town where an old couple allowed him to stay. Read More »

St Simon's Well

According to Edmund Bogg in “From Eden Vale to the plains of York or A Thousand Miles in the Valleys of the Nidd and Yore" (1894) ”In the township of East Scrafton is a spring of water known as St. Simon's Well. Near it once stood an oratory called St. Simon's Chapel; not a vestige of this remains. The well was formerly used as a bath. Tradition says that St. Read More »

The Devil's Apronful

In his  ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ (1888), Rev Thomas Parkinson gave the following account of how the stones known as The Devil's Apronful got their name. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Burnsall

There stories throughout Britain of the Devil building bridges and Rev Thomas Parkinson in his 'Yorkshire Legends and Traditions' (1888) gives the following account for the bridge over the River Dibb at Burnsall. Read More »

The Wise Woman Of Littondale

The following legend of 'The Wise Woman Of Littondale' appeared in 'The Table Book' (1827) by William Hone (Born 3 June 1780 – Died 8 November 1842) and partially reprinted in ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson (1888). Read More »

Troller's Gill, Appletreewick

The caves of this deep limestone ravine are the haunt of trolls and sprites. The Gill is also associated with a black dog legend. Read More »

Yorkshire Dales Big Cat (2010)

The following story by Patrick O'Kane entitled 'Expert: Paw prints in Yorkshire Dales ‘definitely’ from a wild big cat' was published in The Westmorland Gazette on 18th March 2010. Read More »



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