Elvet Bridge, Durham

Elvet Bridge is a Grade I listed mediaeval bridge acrossing the River Wear in Durham. In ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders’, William Henderson (1879) refers to a piece of folklore associated with the bridge. ‘It was on one of the unlucky days (between St.

Route Between Cradle Well and Neville’s Cross

According to Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson (1879), ‘On St. Thomas’s eve and day, too, have carriers and waggoners been most alarmed by the ghost of the murdered woman, who was wont to haunt the path or lane between the Cradle Well and Neville’s Cross.

Swine Drawn Coach (1684)

In his ‘Memorials, or the memorable things that fell out within this island of Britain from 1638 – 1684’ (Published 1818), Robert Law quotes the diary of Jacob Bee of Durham, who refers to a strange experience that was deemed a portent of death. “John Borrow departed this life the 17th day of January being Satterday this yeare 1684 and twas reported y’he see a coa

Tunnel Between Finchale Abbey and Durham Cathedral

The following tunnel legend was printed in ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders’ by William Henderson (1879). ‘There was a wild legend in my native city of a subterranean passage between Finchale Abbey and the cathedral of Durham, and of an attempt to penetrate it.

A Witch-Hare at Sedgefield

The following account of the story is extracted from ‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘A similar incident* is said to have happened at the small market town of Sedgefield, about seventy years ago. A party out coursing hares raised one in a field near that place, towards which they were astonished to see that it ran direct.

Ceddesfield Hall

Ceddesfield Hall is a Grade II listed building dating from the 18thcentury. Now a community centre, Ceddesfield Hall was originally built as a rectory for Reverend George Barrington. The previous rectory which this replaced burned down in 1793. It was this older building that was associated with the ‘Pickled Parson’.

Witch Cat, Staindrop

The following account of the story is extracted from‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘Mr. Hylton Longstaffe relates that a farmer of Staindrop was one night crossing a bridge near that place, when a cat jumped out, stood before him, and looking him full in the face, said "Johnny Reed, Johnny Reed!

A Witch Cat

The following account of the story is extracted from‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘Mr.