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The Great Paw

A common story in the Highlands is recounted here by John Gregorson Campbell in his 1902 book ‘Witchcraft & Second Sight in the Highlands & Islands’. ‘In the big church of Beauly (Eaglais mhor...

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Old Man of Inverfarigaig

‘It may be mentioned here that Loch Ness has its apparition, as well as its monster. It is known to the Highlanders as the Old Man of Inverfarigaig. “The Bodach,” as he is called...

The Witch Of Laggan

A hero celebrated for his hatred of witchcraft, was warming himself in his hunting hut, in the forest of Gaick, in Badenoch. His faithful hounds, fatigued with the morning chase, lay stretched on the turf by his side,–his gun, that would not miss, reclined in the neuk of the bothy,–the skian dhu of the sharp edge hung by his side, and these alone constituted his company.

The Water Horse Bridle of Nether Lochaber

In Folklore of Scottish Lochs and Springs (1893), James Mackinlay quotes an anecdote by Rev Dr Stewart, ‘A drover, whose home was in Nether Lochaber, was returning from a market at Pitlochry by way of the Moor of Rannoch. Night came on; but, as the moon was bright, he continued his journey without difficulty. On reaching Lochanna Cuile, he sat down to refresh himself with bread, cheese, and milk.

Loch Ness Water Horse

James Mackinlay in his Folklore of Scottish Lochs and Springs (1893) tells of another creature that was said to lurch in Loch Ness. ‘A noted demon-steed once inhabited Loch Ness, and was a cause of terror to the inhabitants of the neighbourhood.

John MacInnes And The Each-Uisge

According to Mr. J. Calder Ross in ‘Scottish Notes and Queries’ (1893) "John MacInnes found the labour of his farm sadly burdensome. In the midst of his sighing an unknown being appeared to him and promised a horse to him under certain conditions. These conditions John undertook to fulfil.

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Tarbh Uisge

The Tarbh Uisge or Water Bull is a creature of Scottish folklore similar to the Each Uisge (Water Horse). Some sources claim they could only be found in isolated pools in the highlands, while others suggest they frequented the coastal regions of Scotland.

Ruthven Barracks

The castle that once stood on the site of the barracks, was said to be haunted by its notorious lord, who was trapped in limbo playing cards with the Devil.

Ruthven was first used as a Barracks in 1689. It was taken by force twice; once when the garrison surrendered to Bonnie Dundee, the other time being in 1746 when it was overrun by Jacobite troops.

Tomnahurich Hill

Tomnahurich Hill – which means hill of the yews – is a rounded tree covered hillock on the outskirts of Inverness, the hill has a wealth of traditions associated with it, and it is famed as an abode of the fairies. A modern cemetery now covers the hill.