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Osmotherley

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893). ‘The village of Osmotherley is seven miles from Northallerton in the Cleveland hillside. Tradition has it that Osmund,...

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The Grey Palmer

Eight miles from the city of York, amidst picturesque scenery, on the banks of the River Wharfe, was anciently the site of a Convent of Nuns of the Cistercian order. There was a contemporary...

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The Ship Inn, Acaster Malbis

The following article by Richard Catton and entitled ‘ Another York pub, The Ship Inn, Acaster Malbis, plagued by ghosts’ was published in The York Press on 13th June 2009. A MYSTERIOUS grey figure...

Radiant Boy

‘There is the popular legend of the ‘Radiant Boy’ — a strange boy with a shining face, who has been seen in certain Lincolnshire houses and elsewhere. This ghost was described to Mr. Baring-Gould by a Yorkshire farmer, who, as he was riding one night to Thirsk, suddenly saw pass by him a ‘radiant boy’ on a white horse.

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Feather Death Related Folklore

According to The Ghost World by T. F. Thiselton Dyer (1893) ‘The presence of pigeon or game feathers is said to be another hindrance to the exit of the soul; and, occasionally, in order to facilitate its departure, the peasantry in many parts of England will lay a dying man on the floor.

Lady Well, Thirsk

“An old historian of the town says: "In the marsh near the church flows a spring of pure and excellent water, commonly called Lady Well, doubtless a name of no modern description." Yorks. Folk-lore, p. 199. . [The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893)]

The River Ouse, York

‘There is an old tradition, possibly credited by some at the present time, that if anyone casts five white stones into a particular part of the river Ouse, near the city, as the clock in the Minster tower strikes one on May morning, he will see on the surface of the water, as if looking into a mirror, whatever is desired of the past, present, and future. .

St Johns Well, Sutton-on-the-Forest

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘About a mile from the nunnery*, at the corner of the wood called St. John’s Wood, was formerly an ancient building, consisting of a small dome of stone and brick over a spring, well known in the neighbourhood as "St.

The Crown, Middlesbrough

The Crown public house in Middlebrough is currently closed. The building dates from 1923 and was originally a cinema before becoming a Bingo Hall and pub.

Headless Woman of Dalton

The following account appeared in ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders’ by William Henderson (1879) “At Dalton, near Thirsk,” writes Mr. Baring-Gould, “is an old barn, which is haunted by a headless woman. One night a tramp went into it to sleep.