Category: Wells

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Robin Hood’s Well, Wakefield

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘Robin Hood’s Well is reputed to be the starting-place of a padfoot called in the neighbourhood the “Boggard...

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Thanet Well, Greystoke

In Greystoke, about a mile away on the borders of this parish, there seemed to be a most interesting memorial of St. Kentigern in a well much visited by strangers and farmers called “Thanet...

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St Kenelm’s Well, Winchcombe

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘WHILE the body of St. Kenelm was being brought to Winchcombe, the bearers, becoming very weary and thirsty,...

Giant’s Cave, Edenhall

At Giant’s Cave, near Eden Hall, it has been the custom from time immemorial for the lads and lasses of the neighbouring villages to collect together on the third Sunday in May, to drink sugar and water, when the lasses give the treat: this is called Sugar-and-Water Sunday. They afterwards adjourn to the public house, and the lads return the compliment in cakes, ale, punch, etc.

Holwell Holy Well

"HERE was a holy well or spring in the village of Holwell, on the borders of Bedford and Hertfordshire; unfortunately both history and site have been forgotten by the villagers at Holywell.”—A. C. G. Cameron, H.M. Geological Survey. [The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893)]

Old Brine, Nantwich

On Ascension Day, the old inhabitants of Nantwich piously sang a hymn of thanksgiving for the blessing of the Brine.

St Mungo’s Well, Bromfield

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘In Bromfield there were plenty of legends connected with this well. It is situated in a field near the churchyard. The present vicar, the Rev. R. Taylor, with reverent care, had it cleared and enclosed with a circular vaulted dome of stone, on which he placed an appropriate inscription.

St Cuthbert’s Well, Bromfield

In ‘The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England’ by Robert Charles Hope (1893) we are informed that; ‘In the parish of Bromfield, in the neighbourhood of Blencogo, “on the common to the east of that village, not far from Ware-Brig, near a pretty large rock of granite, called St.

Lady Well, Thirsk

“An old historian of the town says: "In the marsh near the church flows a spring of pure and excellent water, commonly called Lady Well, doubtless a name of no modern description." Yorks. Folk-lore, p. 199. . [The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893)]

St Johns Well, Sutton-on-the-Forest

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘About a mile from the nunnery*, at the corner of the wood called St. John’s Wood, was formerly an ancient building, consisting of a small dome of stone and brick over a spring, well known in the neighbourhood as "St.