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Mayburgh Henge (aka Mayborough Henge)

In 'Rude Stone Monuments In All Countries, Their Age And Uses' (1872) (which was later retitled 'Old Stone Monuments'), James Fergusson(1808-1886) gives the following description of Mayborough Henge. Read More »

Muncaster Castle

Muncaster Castle

I would have to say Muncaster Castle IS haunted. It has been the subject of a long term scientific study headed by Dr Jason Braithwaite and, I have been closely involved with the case throughout its 16 years+ history. This probably makes it he longest running continuous scientific investigation of a haunting and it has certainly been worthwhile. Read More »

Muncaster Paranormal Conference 2009

The UK-Skeptics 2009 conference at Muncaster Castle was held over the weekend of 19 September and I must say was very enjoyable. Read More »

Naworth Castle

Haunted by a 'White Lady', the spirit of a girl who was seduced by Lord Dacre without knowing his identity. She became pregnant and upon discovering Lord Dacres rank and social standing, she realised they would never be together as she was of a lower class. She through herslf into a stream and drowned. The body was discovered by Lord Dacre, his bride to be and the dead girls mother. Read More »

New Books Published on Fairies and Boggles in Cumbria

A SERIES of hand-crafted booklets on the folklore and legends of Cumbria has been published. Read More »

Pendragon Castle

Pendragon Castle

Pendragon Castle is associated with an Arthurian legend. It is said that Arthur's father, Uther Pendragon tried to re-route the river Eden to create a moat for the castle.

The ruin dates to the 1100's and was built by Hugh de Morville one of the knights who killed Thomas of Cantebury, so is out of the time scale for King Arthur. Read More »

The Phantom Of Croglin Grange

Croglin Vampire

The phantom of Croglin Grange is one of the best known vampire stories in Britain. It is as famous in the annals of vampire lore as Whitby and its Dracula associations. The actual story bears the marks of fiction and first appeared in a book called 'In My Solitary life' by Augustus Hare. What follows is an adapted and shortened version of his story. Read More »

Rawthey Bridge Stone Circle

Stones used in the construction of the 1822 Rawthey Bridge over which the A683 passes were plundered from a stone circle described in The History and Antiquities of the Counties of Westmorland and Cumberland, 1777 by J Nicolson & R Burn. “A circle of large stones, supposed to be a monument of druid worship”. According to Rev. Read More »

The Renwick Cockatrice

Cockatrice

In 1733 a cockatrice terrorized Renwick when the church was being demolished. The beast was slayen by John Tallantire with a rowan branch. The creature was described as resembling a bat. Apparently the cockatrice was again reported as having been seen in 1959. Read More »

Scales Tarn

Scales Tarn can be found below Tarn Crags and Sharp Edge on Blencathra (Saddlebeck). It has a local tradition of being bottomless and its position was thought to be so overshadowed that sunlight would never reach it. Read More »

Shap A6 Black Dog

A Phantom Black Dog was said to haunt the A6 around Shap Pass, roughly nine miles south of Penrith. In his book Ghosts of the North, Jack Hallam states ‘Many drivers reported seeing, in the beam of their headlights, a big dog loping along for 200 to 300 yards, before disappearing over a stone wall at a place where there is a 300ft sheer drop’. Read More »

The Solway Ghost Ships

Whitehaven Harbour

The Cumberland News 18/02/2000, featured an article by Ruth Berry and Gill Hands about ghosts on the Solway.
Read More »

Song, at the Feast of Brougham Castle by William Wordsworth

High in the breathless Hall the Minstrel sate.
And Emont's murmur mingled with the Song.--
The words of ancient time I thus translate,
A festal Strain that hath been silent long.
From Town to Town, from Tower to Tower,
The Red Rose is a gladsome Flower.
Her thirty years of Winter past;
The Red Rose is revived at last; Read More »

Souther Fell, Mungrisdale

A phantom army was witnessed on Souther Fell by a farm hand on Mid-Summers-Eve in the year 1735. The army took the form of mounted troops with infantry marching in a column. One year later on the same date the army was seen again by William Lancaster who was a local farmer. Read More »

The Spital Inn And The Hand of Glory

A Hand of Glory was used by a gang of thieves in an attempt to rob the long gone Spital Inn, North Stainmore in 1797. Read More »

St Bees Priory

St Bees Priory Graveslab

The atmospheric church at St Bees is all that remains of a small Benedictine monastery closed down during the reformation. The priory is associated with the legend of St Bega, who is said to have fled here to escape an arranged marriage in Ireland. Read More »

St Cuthbert's Churchyard, Carlisle

St Cuthberts

The graveyard of this old church was the scene of grave robbing, along with other sites in Carlisle during the 1820s.

St Michael and All Angels Parish Church, Arthuret

Though the current Gothic style church dates from 1609, the parish had a church dating from 1150, served by Jedburgh Abbey's monks and it is thought that there was a church on the site as early as the 6th century. Back in the 16th century this area on the border of Scotland between the Solway Firth and Langholm was known as the debatable lands and populated by the Border Reiver families. Read More »

St Patrick's Well

Around 450AD St Patrick, patron saint of Ireland is supposed to have preached on the banks of Ullswater in Cumbria. The whole Patterdale area is named after him. In Glenridding a Holy Well dedicated to St Patrick can still be found roughly one mile outside of the village of Glenridding. Read More »

The Stainton Ghost

The Cumberland News, 30/06/1999 had an article by Ruth Berry and Gill Hands about the Stainton Ghost. According to the story, a church or abbey once stood near the village and human bones were found among the ruins. During the reformation the land upon which this holy building stood fell into the hands of a certain baron, now nameless. Read More »

Swinside Stone Circle

Swinside Stone Circle

A beautiful solitary stone circle, the stones are said to be uncountable, there is also a legend which suggests a church buried beneath the stones. It is sometimes referred to as the Sunkenkirk for this very reason. The circle is also referred to as the 'grey cobbles'. Read More »

The Bridal of Triermain (1813) by Sir Walter Scott

I.
Come Lucy! while 'tis morning hour
       The woodland brook we needs must pass;
So, ere the sun assume his power,
We shelter in our poplar bower,
Where dew lies long upon the flower,
       Though vanish'd from the velvet grass.
Curbing the stream, this stony ridge Read More »

The Monition of Cursing, Archbishop Gavin Dunbar of Glasgow

"Gude folks, heir at my Archibischop of Glasgwis letters under his round sele, direct to me or any uther chapellane, makand mensioun, with greit regrait, how hevy he beris the pietous, lamentabill, and dolorous complaint that pass our all realme and commis to his eris, be oppin voce and fame, how our souverane lordis trew liegis, men, wiffis and barnys, bocht and redeimit be the precious blud Read More »

The Somnambulist by William Wordsworth

List, ye who pass by Lyulphs Tower
At eve; how softly then
Doth Aira-force, that torrent hoarse.
Speak from the woody glen!
Fit music for a solemn vale!
And holier seems the ground
To him who catches on the gale
The spirit of a mournful tale,
Embodied in the sound. Read More »

The Tea Set Of Lizzie Baty, Brampton Witch

The following article entitled ‘Cumbrian witch's cursed tea set promises disaster for new owners’ appeared in the Cumberland News on Friday 10 December 2010. It concerns a legacy left by Lizzie Baty (The Brampton Witch) in the 19th century. Read More »



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