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The Bridestones

The Bridestones are a set of natural weathered stones that are thought to have been used for ancient worship. A weathered horned head is carved into one of the stones, the date of the carving unknown.

Directions: To the East of the A169 Northeast of Lockton.

The Cock and Bottle, York

According to a local paper, George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham who used to live on Skeldergate, York, haunts The Cock and Bottle. The haunting has included the sound of door being broken, the apparition of an ugly man, and other sightings. The ghost is said to be evil and to hates crucifixes.

The Devil's Apronful

In his  ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ (1888), Rev Thomas Parkinson gave the following account of how the stones known as The Devil's Apronful got their name. Read More »

The Devil's Arrows

The Devil's Arrows are three Neolithic Megaliths - the tallest of which is 23 feet high - standing in a crooked alignment of around 580 feet. The fourth stone was destroyed in the 16th century, when Camden noted that it had been pulled down by treasure seekers.

In legend they were thrown by the Devil from Howe Hill to destroy Aldborough, hence their common name. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Burnsall

There stories throughout Britain of the Devil building bridges and Rev Thomas Parkinson in his 'Yorkshire Legends and Traditions' (1888) gives the following account for the bridge over the River Dibb at Burnsall. Read More »

The Golden Fleece, York

The Golden Fleece is a Grade II listed building which claims to be York's most haunted pub. According to their website 'Possibly the most famous ghost is Geoff Monroe, a Canadian airman who was staying at the pub in room four when he died in 1945, by throwing himself or falling out of one of the windows. Read More »

The National Railway Museum

The National Railway Museum is the worlds largest museum dedicated to rail travel and covers over 300 years of worldwide history. One of the many exhibits, a sleeping car, is supposed to be haunted by an unknown prescence.

The Parish Church of All Saints North Street, York

All Saints North Street

All Saints is considered to be York's finest medieval church and has one of the best stained glass displays in Britain. Read More »

The Slingsby Serpent

In 1619 the antiquary Roger Dodsworth (born 1585 – died 1654) gave an early account of the dragon: ‘The tradition is that between Malton and this town there was some time a serpent, that lived upon prey of passengers, and which this Wyvill and his dog did kill, when he received his death-wound. Read More »

The Theatre Royal, York

The Theatre Royal is reputed to be haunted by a ghostly nun who has been witnessed several times. The Theatre was built on the site of Old St Leonard's Hospital founded in the 12th century. The theatre also has a tradition about a Grey Lady, and the ghost of an actor who died in a duel.

The Three Mariners Inn, Scarborough

The Three Mariners

The Three Mariners Inn - which is now a museum dedicated to the history of smuggling in the area - dates back to the 1300s and, is the earliest licensed premises in Scarborough.

It is said to be haunted by a headless woman, who warns fishermen of impending disaster. Read More »

The Treasurer's House

The Treasurer's House was the seat of the treasurers of York Minister from the 12th century to 1546. The last treasurer - William Cliffe - resigned, after all the treasure was removed during the dissolution of the monasteries. The house was extensively rebuilt in the 17th century. Read More »

The Windmill, York

A whole host of acitivity has been reported at The Windmill, including cold spots, strange footsteps, the apparition of a 18th centry ostler and spontaneous glass and bottle shattering.

The Wise Woman Of Littondale

The following legend of 'The Wise Woman Of Littondale' appeared in 'The Table Book' (1827) by William Hone (Born 3 June 1780 – Died 8 November 1842) and partially reprinted in ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson (1888). Read More »

The York Arms, York

The York Arms is haunted by a Grey Lady. She also haunts the Theatre RoyalTheatre Royal, which stands across from it, this sounds like a linked legend, and it may be worth noting if there is a legend about a connecting tunnel.

Troller's Gill, Appletreewick

The caves of this deep limestone ravine are the haunt of trolls and sprites. The Gill is also associated with a black dog legend. Read More »

Upsall

Upsall is associated with a common tale: A man from the village dreamed for three consecutive nights that he should go to London and stand on London Bridge. Conceding to impulse he went to London and while on the bridge he was approached by a Quaker, to whom he told his dream. Read More »

Viking Hotel, York

In the past staff of this hotel claimed to have seen a shadowy shape on the stairs. The site of the hotel used to have a house upon it, which was reputedly haunted and connected to a murder.

Wade and his Wife

Foawr

Wade and his wife were two giants, said to have lived in the area around Whitby in North Yorkshire. As part of the old race they both had the most tremendous powers, and could lift mountains and throw giant boulders like pebbles. Read More »

Whitby

Whitby is associated with a wealth of traditions and legends. The abbey, now a guant ruin, was built in 651AD and destroyed in a Danish raid in 870AD, it was reconstructed by the Benedictines in the 11th Century. At one time crowds used to gather at the West side of Whitby churchyard, where there was clear view of the North side of the abbey and the highest window. Read More »

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey 2

Whitby Abbey is one of the most atmospheric locations in England. The desolate ruins stand stark above steep cliffs overlooking the old whaling village of Whitby in North Yorkshire, a testament to the town's former religious significance. Read More »

York Castle

The castle was the scene of a strange hallucination in 1717. Sir John Reresby saw a piece of paper that was being blown by the wind turn into a monkey and then a bear. Perhaps an early discoverer of Opium.

Clifford's Tower Read More »

Yorkshire Dales Big Cat (2010)

The following story by Patrick O'Kane entitled 'Expert: Paw prints in Yorkshire Dales ‘definitely’ from a wild big cat' was published in The Westmorland Gazette on 18th March 2010. Read More »

Yorkshire Hussar, York

Four decorators working late through the night saw a black cape clad figure pass them and disappear behind the bar where an old door had once been. The ghost was also known to smash glasses and overturn bar stools.

Yorkshire Witches by Eileen Rennison

Yorkshire Witches by Eileen Rennison

We no longer believe in witches as our ancestors once did. However, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, any unforeseen or unexplained events were likely to be attributed to witchcraft. Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


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