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St Simon's Well

According to Edmund Bogg in “From Eden Vale to the plains of York or A Thousand Miles in the Valleys of the Nidd and Yore" (1894) ”In the township of East Scrafton is a spring of water known as St. Simon's Well. Near it once stood an oratory called St. Simon's Chapel; not a vestige of this remains. The well was formerly used as a bath. Tradition says that St. Read More »

St. Crux Church, York

The 15th century St Crux Church was demolished in 1887 and some of its stone was then used to build St Crux Parish Hall. Writing in 1939, Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) mentioned the following ghostly traditions associated with St Crux in his ‘Haunted Churches’. ‘All kinds of stories have at various times been circulated regarding ghostly happenings at St. Read More »

St. George's Church, York

On George Street stands the Roman Catholic Church of St George, across from the site of an earlier 16th century St George’s Church which fell into ruin. With the graveyard (which still survives) of this original St George’s was thought to be buried Richard "Dick" Turpin (Died 7 April 1739). Read More »

St. Mary's Church, Scarborough

St Mary's Church is a Grade I listed building dating from the 12th century, though much of it was rebuilt in the 17th century after it was damaged during the siege ofScarborough Castle during the English Civil War in 1644. In ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939), Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) refers to a woman keeping vigil at St Mary’s on St Mark’s Eve. Read More »

Stokesley

The Wise man of a stokesley a man called Wrightson is reputed to have been a great seer and healer. The 7th son of a 7th daughter he was especially famed for healing cattle and his far sight. He died in the 1900s. Many villages had such wise men and women famed for their powers.

Swinsty Hall

Swinsty Hall dates from the 16th Century and can be found on the banks of Swinsty Reservoir (built 1874). Read More »

Tadcaster Tiger (2006)

In 2006 there was a tiger scare in North Yorkshire around Tadcaster. The following article appeared on the BBC News Website [23 June 2006] entitled 'Police alert over 'tiger' reports' and includes details of a sighting on the B1223, also known as Boggart Lane. Read More »

Tancred Hospital

In the village of Whixley is a large house that once belonged to the Tancred family. The last heir to this family stated in his Will that he was not to be buried underground and instead that he was to be interred in the family home, which he was. His coffin became a point of local interest and speculation arose that his ghost must haunt the house, though there is no evidence of this. Read More »

The Blinded Giant, Dalton

The following tale of a North Yorkshire giant appeared in 'English Fairy and Other Folk Tales' by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890] who cited 'Notes on the Folk-Lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders.' Read More »

The Bridestones

The Bridestones are a set of natural weathered stones that are thought to have been used for ancient worship. A weathered horned head is carved into one of the stones, the date of the carving unknown.

Directions: To the East of the A169 Northeast of Lockton.

The Cock and Bottle, York

According to a local paper, George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham who used to live on Skeldergate, York, haunts The Cock and Bottle. The haunting has included the sound of door being broken, the apparition of an ugly man, and other sightings. The ghost is said to be evil and to hates crucifixes.

The Devil's Apronful

In his  ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ (1888), Rev Thomas Parkinson gave the following account of how the stones known as The Devil's Apronful got their name. Read More »

The Devil's Arrows

The Devil's Arrows are three Neolithic Megaliths - the tallest of which is 23 feet high - standing in a crooked alignment of around 580 feet. The fourth stone was destroyed in the 16th century, when Camden noted that it had been pulled down by treasure seekers.

In legend they were thrown by the Devil from Howe Hill to destroy Aldborough, hence their common name. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Burnsall

There stories throughout Britain of the Devil building bridges and Rev Thomas Parkinson in his 'Yorkshire Legends and Traditions' (1888) gives the following account for the bridge over the River Dibb at Burnsall. Read More »

The Golden Fleece, York

The Golden Fleece is a Grade II listed building which claims to be York's most haunted pub. According to their website 'Possibly the most famous ghost is Geoff Monroe, a Canadian airman who was staying at the pub in room four when he died in 1945, by throwing himself or falling out of one of the windows. Read More »

The National Railway Museum

The National Railway Museum is the worlds largest museum dedicated to rail travel and covers over 300 years of worldwide history. One of the many exhibits, a sleeping car, is supposed to be haunted by an unknown prescence.

The Parish Church of All Saints North Street, York

All Saints North Street

All Saints is considered to be York's finest medieval church and has one of the best stained glass displays in Britain. Read More »

The Slingsby Serpent

In 1619 the antiquary Roger Dodsworth (born 1585 – died 1654) gave an early account of the dragon: ‘The tradition is that between Malton and this town there was some time a serpent, that lived upon prey of passengers, and which this Wyvill and his dog did kill, when he received his death-wound. Read More »

The Theatre Royal, York

The Theatre Royal is reputed to be haunted by a ghostly nun who has been witnessed several times. The Theatre was built on the site of Old St Leonard's Hospital founded in the 12th century. The theatre also has a tradition about a Grey Lady, and the ghost of an actor who died in a duel.

The Three Mariners Inn, Scarborough

The Three Mariners

The Three Mariners Inn - which is now a museum dedicated to the history of smuggling in the area - dates back to the 1300s and, is the earliest licensed premises in Scarborough.

It is said to be haunted by a headless woman, who warns fishermen of impending disaster. Read More »

The Treasurer's House

The Treasurer's House was the seat of the treasurers of York Minister from the 12th century to 1546. The last treasurer - William Cliffe - resigned, after all the treasure was removed during the dissolution of the monasteries. The house was extensively rebuilt in the 17th century. Read More »

The Windmill, York

A whole host of acitivity has been reported at The Windmill, including cold spots, strange footsteps, the apparition of a 18th centry ostler and spontaneous glass and bottle shattering.

The Wise Woman Of Littondale

The following legend of 'The Wise Woman Of Littondale' appeared in 'The Table Book' (1827) by William Hone (Born 3 June 1780 – Died 8 November 1842) and partially reprinted in ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson (1888). Read More »

The York Arms, York

The York Arms is haunted by a Grey Lady. She also haunts the Theatre RoyalTheatre Royal, which stands across from it, this sounds like a linked legend, and it may be worth noting if there is a legend about a connecting tunnel.

Troller's Gill, Appletreewick

The caves of this deep limestone ravine are the haunt of trolls and sprites. The Gill is also associated with a black dog legend. Read More »

The Dolphin Hotel, Littlehampton

Ellie and Katie along with their staff have created a warm and friendly pub with a traditional feel and traditional values. They have worked hard to turn the Dolphin into one of the safest, cleanest and most welcoming pubs around. Between them they have nearly 30 years experience in the pub and catering trade. Read More »



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