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English Fairies


Barnoldby le Beck

The Churchyard of St Helen’s in Barnoldby le Beck and the fields and surrounding the village have been said to be haunted by a Shag-Foal, a rough coated goblin horse, described as a cross between a black dog and a horse. Read More »

Black Annis

Black Annis

The area around the Dane Hills in Leicestershire, (now built upon) was said to be haunted by a creature known as Black Annis, possibly the remnants of some pagan goddess in darker times. Read More »

The Black Down Hills

The Black Downs have a long tradition as a haunt of the fairies, and stories tell of many sightings as recently as a few hundred years ago, when many country folk believed we shared this land with supernatural denizens. Read More »

Boggart

Boggarts

The Boggart is most commonly found in the counties of Yorkshire and Lancashire, its name appears in places such as Boggart's Clough and Boggart's Hole in Lancashire. Boggarts were mischievous spirits responsible for mishaps and poltergeist activity within the home and in the countryside. Read More »

Brownies

A widespread name for a fairy or supernatural creature, they were small in appearance and wore brown coloured clothing.

Like many mischievous spirits they were thought to be attached to houses or families and could be helpful in menial household tasks. If offended they became malignant and mischievous, creating poltergeist activity and generally making a nuisance of themselves. Read More »

Changelings

Changelings are part of Western Folklore, a child of a fairy type (Elf, Troll etc) which has been secretly swapped for a human baby and left in its place. George Waldron gave the following description of one he saw in the Isle of Man and it was subsequently reprinted in ‘The Science of Fairy Tales’ (1891) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

Cobs And Knops

Cobs and knops were hobgoblins, much feared. They were originally demon horses, and it is clear that belief in them remained strong in Warwickshire, for in parts of the county on All Souls' Day (2nd November) those brave enough went out carrying a simulated horse's head covered with a sheet to frighten the timid.
[The Folklore Of Warwickshire (1976) by Roy Palmer]

Creech Hill

The Creech Hill Bullbegger is said to haunt the area, as a tall apparition who laughs manically from the hillside. A Bullbeggar is the local name for a boggart or mischievous spirit. Read More »

Dobbin

Dobbin were lazy creatures who would attach themselves to a particular farm. In times of trouble they sometimes exerted themselves on behalf of the family.
[The Folklore Of Warwickshire (1976) by Roy Palmer]

English Fairies Quick Guide

Abbey Lubbers - Abbey lubbers were spirits who haunted the abbeys of 15th century England. They were said to be the cause of drunkenness and debauchery amongst monks. They especially haunted the abbey wine cellars.

The Apple Tree Man -The spirit of the oldest tree in Somerset orchards, he was responsible for the orchards fertility. Read More »

Fairy Ointment

Once upon a time there was, in this celebrated town [Tavistock], a Dame Somebody, I do not know her name, and as she is a real character, I have no right to give her a fictitious one. All I with truth can say, is, that she was old, and nothing the worse for that; for age is, or ought to be, held in honor as the source of wisdom and experience. Read More »

Flibbertigibbet

The flibbertigibbet was a night demon who 'mopped and mowed' between the ringing of the curfew bell and the crowing of the first cock, with the object of terrifying young women.
[The Folklore Of Warwickshire (1976) by Roy Palmer]

Goblin Market by Christina Georgina Rossetti

Goblin Market

Goblin Market is a poem by Christina Georgina Rossetti (Born 5 December 1830 – Died 29 December 1894) and was first published in 1862 (having been written in 1859). Rossetti, who published children's poems, claimed that the Goblin Market was aimed at children, however, also suggested that it was not, given the sexual imagery it contains.

MORNING and evening Read More »

Hob Hole, Runswick Bay

The haunt of a goblin, Hob, which is a generic term for a brownie of boggle in Yorkshire. This hob was unusual in that the was thought to be able to cure whooping cough, and parents would bring their afflicted child to the cave and recite a rhyme in the hope of a cure.

Directions: Runswick Bay reached via a minor road off the A174 to the Northwest of Whitby.

Holman Clavel Inn

The Black Downs are also the home of the Holman Clavel Inn, which resides near Blagdon. The Inn was said to house a spirit known as 'Chimbley Charlie', a kind of protective hearth spirit once thought to reside in many homes. Read More »

Hylton Castle

The Grade I listed ruin of Hylton Castle, seat of the Hylton (previously Hilton) family was built by Sir William Hylton (1376–1435) shortly after 1390. This small four storey gatehouse styled castle, replaced the earlier wooden fortification of Henry de Hilton, which had been built on this site around 1072. Read More »

Irton Cross and Church

Irton Cross

There are two Celtic Crosses in Irton Churchyard, one is truly ancient and the other is a copy of the former incorporated into more modern grave. The ancient cross is thought to date from the early ninth century, before the Norsemen invaded the area. Read More »

The Knockers

In many old established mining areas throughout the world, there was a
long tradition of mine spirits, in Cornwall these were known as the
Knockers. They frequented the tin mines that formed much of local
economy in 18th and 19th century Cornwall. Knockers was not the only
name given to mine spirits others being Knackers, Buccas, and Spriggans Read More »

The Lantern Man

The Lantern Man is one version of the common Will o’ the Wisp or Jack o’ Lantern phenomena within Norfolk and the haunted fens. This supernatural belief has many variations throughout Britain. Read More »

Mermaids

Mermaid

Tales of mermaids have been around for centuries, and form a large part of seafaring lore, especially round the coastal areas of Britain such as Cornwall, and the Northern Isles of Scotland. Their sighting was thought to be a bad omen, foretelling storms and rough seas. There are numerous folk tales describing their interaction with humans. Read More »

New Books Published on Fairies and Boggles in Cumbria

A SERIES of hand-crafted booklets on the folklore and legends of Cumbria has been published. Read More »

The Piskies of Cornwall

Cornish Piskie

There are a number of creatures particular to Cornish folklore, although their cousins can be found elsewhere in Britain under a different name and guise. One of these strains is the Piskie also known as a Pixie in other West Country counties.

The Piskie is a general name for a fairy race or tribe in Cornwall. Read More »

Pixie Day, Ottery St Mary

The nearest Saturday to Midsummer's Day is Pixie Day in Ottery St Mary, where school children dressed as Pixies re-enact a legendary tale in which the local fairies tried to silence the church bells before retreating to their cave for another year. Read More »

Sedgley’s Beacon Tower

Sedgeley Beacon Tower

Sedgley Beacon lies some 237 metres (777 feet) above sea level in the heart of the West Midlands. It is said that the top of Beacon Hill is the highest point between Sedgley and the Ural Mountains in Russia. Commanding views were once enjoyed right across the industrial Black Country and beyond to the Clee and Malvern hills and the mountains of Wales. Read More »

Sittal Hill, Freiston

Thought to be the site of monks hospital, Spittal Hill can be found at the end of Fox Hole Lane on the A52 and it has a repution of being the haunt of a shag-foal. Read More »



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