You are hereFolklore / Fairies / Welsh Fairies

Welsh Fairies


Mynydd y Fedw

In 'Celtic Folklore Welsh And Manx' (1901), John Rhys recounted the following folktale originally passed down Siân Dafydd of Helfa Fawr, and Mari Domos Siôn of Tyn Gadlas, Llanberis who would probably have been born around 1770. Read More »

Pentre Ifan

Pentre Ifan

This is one of the most recognisable chambered cairns in Wales, with a huge capstone supported by the points of 3 upright stones. Read More »

River Honddu Water Horse

The River Honddu (Afon Honddu) runs through the Black Mountains in the Brecon Beacons starting at the Vale of Ewyas and said, according to folklore, to be the home of a small grey Ceffyl-dwr (a welsh water horse similar to a Kelpie). Read More »

Rowli Pugh and the Ellyll

Wirt Sykes gave the following Glamorganshire folktale in his 'British Goblins' (1881). 'On a certain farm in Glamorganshire lived Rowli Pugh, who was known far and wide for his evil luck. Read More »

St. Llechid's Church, Llanllechid

The Church of St Llechid is a Grade II listed building. Built to replace a much earlier 15th century church, the building dates from 1844. There is a siting legend relating the building of original St. Read More »

Strange Lands By Andrew L Paciorek

Strange Lands

Andy Paciorek is one of Mysterious Britain & Irelands favourite contributors and his amazing artwork can be found illustrating articles throughout this site. Read More »

The Aberystwyth Mermaid

The story of the Aberystwyth Mermaid was published after 1826, written in Welsh. The general abbreviated story is outlined below. Read More »

The Coblynau

The Welsh version of the Cornish Knockers, these mine spirits were relatively good humoured, and helped the miners by knocking in places with rich lodes of mineral, or metal. The Coblynau dressed in miners' attire, and stood at around 18 inches in height. Read More »

The Cwn Annwn

The Cwn Annwn, which means hounds of the otherworld (underworld), are Welsh phantom dogs seen as a death portent. Their growling is louder when they are at a distance, and as they draw near the growling grows softer and softer. Read More »

The Old Man And The Fairies

The following story appeared in P. H. Emerson's 'Welsh Fairy-Tales and Other Stories' (1894).  Many years ago the Welsh mountains were full of fairies. People used to go by moonlight to see them dancing, for they knew where they would dance by seeing green rings in the grass. Read More »

The Undreamed Region: Barrows In Folklore & Archaeology

Hills, mounds and burial sites. Places which have a timeless allure. Such places can be seen and regarded as mythically liminal, a place that it is not a place. A place outside of time. A place where the living freely walk with the dead. Barrows are just such places. Read More »

Trichug

Trichrug or Pen-y-bicws is a hill in the Brecon Beacons standing 415m in height. It is associated with both a stone throwing giant and local fairies. Read More »

Tylwyth Teg

Tylwyth Teg is a general name for the fairies in Wales, it means the 'fair folk'. Like the Bendith y Mamau the flattering name was thought to appease them. Read More »

Tylwyth Teg of Cwm Llan

In this valley below the south eastern side of Yr Wyddfa (Mount Snowdon), it is said that the Tylwyth Teg (Fairy Folk) live. It is said that one day, a shepherd heard a wailing sound, and he moved a rock where the sound was coming from. When he did this he rescued a Tylwyth Teg who has trapped there. Later, he encountered two old men who thanked him, and gave him a staff. Read More »

Tylwyth Teg of Llyn Cwellyn

In 'Celtic Folklore Welsh And Manx' (1901) John Rhys mentioned a story concerning fairies that had been passed to him by two brothers who had in turn heard it from Mari Domos Siôn, who died around 1850. 'A shepherd had once lost his way in the mist on the mountain on the land of Caeau Gwynion, towards Cwellyn Lake, and got into a ring where the Tylwyth Teg* were dancing: it was only af Read More »

Wild Edric's Wife

In ‘The Science of Fairy Tales’ (1891), Edwin Sidney Hartland recounts the following tale told by the medieval writer Walter Map (Born 1140- Died c. 1208–1210). ‘Wild Edric*, of whose historic reality as one of the English rebels against William the Conqueror there is ample proof. Read More »

Will o' the Wisp

Will o' the Wisp

The Will o' the Wisp is the most common name given to the mysterious lights that were said to lead travellers from the well-trodden paths into treacherous marshes. The tradition exists with slight variation throughout Britain, the lights often bearing a regional name. Read More »

Yr Ogaf Ddu (The Black Cave), Near Criccieth

This cave is associated with a legend common in Britain, that of pipers disappearing into the fairy realm.

Four pipers went into this cave to commune with the fairies, but they never returned. Their piping can still be heard when the air is quiet.

‘The Baby of Y Dolydd'

Y Dolydd is a long vacated, derelict cottage with an interesting Tylwyth Teg (Welsh Fairy) legend associated with it. Many years ago the cottage was the residence to a poor young widow, who one day encountered a charismatic Tylwyth Teg who asked her to bring up a child for him. The widow agreed to this, and several days later she found a beautiful baby boy on her doorstep. Read More »



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site