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Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.


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bedb
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Re: Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.

I'm sorry, I did not know this. I know at some time in the past few years he had some difficulty with the IRS over the museum...I believe. I know money and museum were mentioned in the same breath.

bedb
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Re: Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.

There is an American outdoor writer named Chester Moore. He makes his living writing serious wild life articles, but he also looks for the unusual like giant catfish living below dams, ivory billed woodpeckers and wild redwolves in Texas.
http://www.chestermoore.net/crypto

I was a big fan of cryptokeeper....but as you see he shut it down. But he was affliated with Gulf Coast BigFoot researchers who advocate killing one to prove it exists.
http://www.gcbro.com/

this website is good for reports submitted by folks who've had encounters. As I've said...I've never run into one...don't want to....but my dad and grandfather ran into something that scared them...and my dad was career Army/paratrooper.
bev 

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Ian Topham
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Re: Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.

What did your father and grandfather experience Bedb?  Did they ever write up an account?

bedb
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Re: Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.

No written accounts, but the oral traditions and stories would have kept you mesmerized and spellbound.

My grandfather lived in deep woods Mississippi. If you have ever seen George Clooney's Oh Brother Where Art Thou...you will get a feel for that time. Deep pine forests, dirt roads, very poor people who lived off the land and raised cotton for cash.

One story my father told me involved his shop teacher..a man he said was very sober and God-fearing....this was his way of saying the man wouldn't lie. There are two ways to get to the area where my grandfather lived, both dirt roads, but one way went close to the swamp..called a reebrake by the locals. It's basically the headwaters of very slow moving shallow river. This teacher was walking home one night and something large stepped into the road in front of him. These people are very familar with bears and anything else that lived in those woods, but this wasn't a bear. The teacher was so scared of what he was seeing he turned around and went back down the road to take the long way home.

Another time my dad and his first cousin went hunting with hounds after raccoons. These hounds were not afraid of anything according to my dad, but something scared them badly tht night, and Dad said it was the Booger.

My great grandfather was clearing some timber and something scared him out of the woods. He never went back down there.

In the 1960s my grandfather said a panther came through the region (and I remember my mother saying one came through in the forties) and the screaming terrified his fox hounds, but I checked on when panthers disappeared from Mississippi, and there weren't any by then. There was always something screaming in the swamp that they said was a panther. But if you ever heard the men talk among themselves...you know they were troubled among themselves. And like I said my Dad believed to his dying day that something lived in the swamp below my grandfather's house.

My grandfather told a story about fox hunting one night (the hounds run and the men sit around camp fires and listen). They were getting ready to go home and poured what was left of their coffee over the fire. They climbed the hill and looked back. Something was standing by the embers, and Pa said it was the Booger.

There could be explanations for most of these sighting. Dad thought moonshiners were in the area...but he also believed there was something nonhuman also in the area. If you are used to street lamps outside at night....this part of Mississippi will scare you at night. It's so dark sometimes you can't see your hand in front of your face. Just ask my daughers...hehehehe 

Mauro
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Re: Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.

According to recent studies the Eastern Puma (Puma concolor couguar) survived the critical period between 1900 and 1930 and is now making a big comeback. The Texas Puma (P. concolor stanleyana) may also have a wider range than formerly thought.
If there's a lesson I've learnt, big carnivores are extremely hard to track down even when they carry a radiocollar (because the damn things break down all the time). That's why the best park rangers/game wardens have always been recruited among experienced poachers...
Not saying the screamer was a Puma but the possibility is not as remote as it may sound.

__________________

"Louhi spoke in riddled tones of three things to achieve: find and catch the Devil's Moose and bring it here to me. Seize the Stallion born of Fire, harness the Golden Horse. He captured and bound the Moose, he tamed the Golden Horse. Still there remained one final task: hunt for the Bird from the Stream of Death"

-Kalevala, Rune XIII-


bedb
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Re: Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.

I understand that...and neither my Dad nor my grandfather ever called it anything but the Burns Booger (this being the name of the land where the swamp was)

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Ian Topham
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Re: Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.

It certainly makes me glad that Britain has no big predators lurking in the bushes......well, we're not supposed to have anyway.

Going back to Mauro's earlier post I agree that we'd need a carcass or living specimen to prove the existence of a Big Foot.  I am of the opinion that eventhough there is enough forested ares in the United States to hide a population of these creatures, it does not mean that they do.

So what is evidence for these creatures and how could it help us find them if they exist?

I am assuming it is basically witness accounts, Indian folklore and casts of tracks.  Do these tracks indicate the paths supposedly used by the sasquatch, and if so could a series of secret motion sensitive cameras be set up to cover them?

Also I take it that they must be a Big Foot cemetary somewhere in the woods unless they are immortal or discard their dead in other ways.

Mauro
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Re: Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.

A friend of mine went to Mongolia to interview a nomad who's supposed to be one of the last living persons to have seen an Almas (wildman). The sighting took place in 1986 if I remember correctly.
The nomad also took my friend to the exact spot where the sighting took place. They were accompanied by the guide/interpreter and a park ranger.
My friend noted the area of the sighting is literally full of natural caves, something no previous "armchair investigator" noted since nobody bothered asking the nomad to go and see the place. He later told me passing those caves through a fine comb would probably yield better results than walking around at random in what is by any standard unchartered territory. No "spectacular find" would be needed, just a few subfossil bones in acceptable conditions.
The famous Pangboche Hand was exactly a case of a "smoking gun", for no other reason that anthropologists couldn't agree on what it exactly was: while everybody agreed it belonged to a member of the genus Homo, the species was a matter of controversy. It was variously identificated as belonging to a modern H. sapiens, to an archaic H. sapiens, to an H. neanderthalensis and to H. erectus. Osman Hill said it displayed "both modern and archaic traits", though this may be due to the fact some genuine bones were replaced in the '50s.
Whatever it was it's now gone: it was stolen five years ago. According to investigators it now resides in Japan.

__________________

"Louhi spoke in riddled tones of three things to achieve: find and catch the Devil's Moose and bring it here to me. Seize the Stallion born of Fire, harness the Golden Horse. He captured and bound the Moose, he tamed the Golden Horse. Still there remained one final task: hunt for the Bird from the Stream of Death"

-Kalevala, Rune XIII-


bedb
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Re: Dumb things bigfoot hunters do.

I can not say this enough...I have never seen bigfoot....but I've looked. When I was in TBRC we had monthly meetings with discussions on encounters and such. And I started wondering why there were human attacks in certain areas (the most famous being Boggy Creek)

On one outting we wandered around this lake in a remote area. It was the paranormal tourist trip. Impress the city folk. Only I grew up in the big woods and saw things the city folks didn't. Cedar trees if you don't know come in male and female trees. Cedar berries are food sources for many animals from deer to migratory birds.

At the parkinglot for the boat ramp was a huge female cedar tree...ten to twelve feet tall. I'm five foot seven which is just shy of being model tall. I don't know the conversion. So this tall tree was full of cedar berries. I walked past it going into the woods (pine trees and oaks) and looked around but saw nothing interesting.

On my way back...I looked at that tall female cedar and stopped. Something had picked every berry off the back side of that tree from ground to top. I walked up to the tree and looked...and every berry was picked clean off the back side. A small tree that I thought was male was bent over beside it...alive but bent over....except I found either two or three berries still on it. Something had bent that small tree over in such a way that it did not come back up and almost picked it clean. This was on my right.

I looked to the left and on a straight line was another giant female cedar. Something had pulled a branch down without breaking it off and took the berries off the branch.  

I showed all this to the senior members of the group and they looked at it without comment. I do not know if bigfoot was feeding here...but something big was having a nighttime snack here.

That's when I started looking at the different kinds of cedar trees. The most common...which grows in England and Europe and Canada...does not grow in Texas. We've got some others...and two of them are down right deadly. Actually these are junipers...and the bad boys are Juniper ashei and a swamp cedar. 

The poison in them is called alpha thujone...these two have the most of any species of jumiper/cedar. Definately not vermouth and gin friendly. The boggy creek bigfoot...lives in the heart of the ash cedar's growth area. I figured IF Bigfoot is real...then the animals in this area are getting their brains fried by cedar berries.



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