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Where Are The Dinosaur Ghosts?


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Columbine
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 Another idea is to do with

 Another idea is to do with brains. Run with me a second.

So, if a human ghost is something like a retained record of that living individual, some sort of echo mapping of electro-magnetic waves? in other words, brainwaves. And a reptilian brain, prehistoric or otherwise, is one of the most simple brain constructions, other than (obviously) insects etc. (it equates, roughly, to the knobbly bit of brainstem in humans that controls motions to eat, bonk, sleep, kill things and so on.) doesn't it make sense that they simply don't have enough actual presence to leave anything behind once they cop it?

Are there ghost snakes?  

Mysteryshopper
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How would you define a

How would you define a 'brain wave' exactly?

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Ian Topham
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Interesting theory

Interesting theory Columbine.  So what animals have been reported as ghosts.

Mongoose - If we count Jeff on Isle of Man
Horse - usually with rider or pulling a coach
Dog

There must be more. 

I don't think I'll much help defining a brainwave :(

Columbine
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 A 'brain wave' is what's

 A 'brain wave' is what's measured on an EEG scan. Basically, though, when neurons fire within the brain, they emit minute traces of electro-magnetism through the synapse (the gap between each neuron). As most of the brain is active all at once (In fact, when they do scans to isolate, say, the 'kicking' part of the brain is, they have to do one scan while your kicking, and one scan when you're not, and then play 'spot the difference') there's a surprising amount of radiation. Though, of course, not enough to be noticeable by most people.  

Moreover, blood flowing within the brain is also magnetic due to the activity of the neurons (they suck up oxygen from the blood), and that's what's measured in an fMRI.

So combined, there's a lot of energy whizzing about the average brain, and the patterns of it at the smallest level (the paths between neuron and neuron) whilst mapping over similar areas on a general level (eg, emotional reactions are always based in the amygdala) are highly individualistic. Indeed, unique as a fingerprint, but much much harder to pinpoint. 

For example, when thinking 'dog' a select set of neurons might fire to form the image of 'dog' in a person's brain like this:

1011010111 (with 1's being active neurons, and 0 being inactive neurons)

but for person x, these neurons might be neurons
1011010111
AGHJYUWR

But for person y, the same chain might be performed by slightly different neurons:
1011010111
AGPLEUGIN

which of course, leads to interesting things like personal differences, personalities, different reactions etc. 

So if ghosts are the echoes of these patterns, somehow preserved it would stand to reason that they could therefore map the individual they came from, right down to their physical form (in much the same way people with missing limbs can still 'feel' them).

Which leads me to another idea; the ghost horse with the rider or carriage. Couldn't that be a case where it's not the reflection of the animal itself, but the manifestation of the human spirit's memory of the beast? it's harder to puzzle out, but it doesn't seem entirely illogical to me.  

Mysteryshopper
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The fields produced by

The fields produced by neirons firing are absolutely tiny. fMRI doesn't measure these fields. Instead, it imposes a huge external field (1 or 2 Tesla) and uses the tiny differences in magnetic susceptibility between oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin to see where oxygen from the blood is being used, so indicating indirectly where neuron activity is taking place.

The 'brain waves' detected by EEG are thought to be organising pulses for coordinating neuron activity (like the clock pulse in an electronic circuit) which don't tell you much about the what the brain is doing in detail.
Do you have a link for the stuff about neuron firing for an individual concept being different between individuals, please?

Your idea is interesting but I don't see why such tiny magnetic fields could be preserved. I doubt the fields generated by individual neurons firing are even strong enough to get outside the skull. And how would these magnetic fields be preserved and on what medium?

Columbine
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What can I say? I haven't

What can I say? I haven't brushed up on it in several years and I wrote off the top of my head. Though if you're so up to the grist, I'm baffled as to why you bothered asking in the first place. 

I would love to provide you a source for the coding, but it's muddled into a stack of two-year's worth of notes approximately on the wrong side of the country so I can't. If I find it when I get back to the other house, i'll try and furnish you with the article details though you might find it a bit of a chore getting hold of the main text without a good library. Academic google might find it, but whether or not it would be free to access it i can't say. 

It was quite specific though; there's apparently not only chains of coding for categories (related to memory recall, as it happens), but more detailed chains for members of each category as well. so, as well as 'dog', you'd have a similar chain with a few minor alterations which would make 'Jack Russel'. I suppose the only thing I could add is that it makes logical sense for the chains to be slightly different, given that the pathways in our brains form with usage. We develop at different rates, we construct our images of the world in slightly different ways based on culture and personal experience, and they can affect a person significantly if they go astray. 

Frankly, I don't see how such things could be recorded, but other researcher's have, actually it's not -My- theory at all; i've seen a couple of documentaries where the researcher has launched off on this tangent, so I thought it worth mentioning. 

 On the other hand, if it's not some sort of preserved energy (and I'm running on a purely science based concept here of the 'soul', personal beliefs aside) What is it? And if it IS energy from an individual, wouldn't the brain (as in, the thing that dominates our memory, emotions, perceptions etc) be a more likely source than say, a foot? 

And, to go back on topic,  where are the dinosaurs?  

SJMcKenzie
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...

I guess we can't ask dinosaurs whether they can see dinosaur ghosts...

Mysteryshopper
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Sorry Columbine if I came

Sorry Columbine if I came across as rude. I just didn't want other readers to get the wrong idea about fMRI. My question about how you define brain waves was because I wondered if you were refering to something other than EEG stuff.

I think what you say about different people encoding thoughts or memories with different neuron firing sequences is correct (I remember reading something about it somewhere but I can't find it). I just wondered if you had a link as it is fascinating.

However, this point raises a major problem for your theory. If we all encode thoughts differently then, even if they can somehow be recorded, how could I understand your recorded thoughts (or those of someoneone recorded years ago)? Your neuron sequence would be different to mine so it would make no sense to my brain.

Also, this theory suffers another problem, in common with the 'stone tape' idea (that images are somehow recorded, rather than thoughts) - why would we only see figures rather than entire scenes? When we look (or when a camera records), we see a whole scene, not just a figure.

You say we have a mental map of our bodies, which is true (read that somewhere too) but I don't think it would recall clothes. And, again, it would be encoded differently for each individual so how could I read yours?

I'm just playing Devil's advocate here. I think it's an interesting idea, worth exploring, but there are a few basic objections to overcome first.

Where are the dinosaurs? Well, lake monsters are an obvious place to start though I'm not sure why they are restricted to lakes (unless it's that 'humps' and 'necks' in the water can be simulated easily by bits of trees and otters).

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Ian Topham
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I think this is a great

I think this is a great theory Columbine and I wish I knew more about the subject to aid the discussion.  One point Mysteryshopper made got me thinking.

Mysteryshopper wrote:

You say we have a mental map of our bodies, which is true (read that somewhere too) but I don't think it would recall clothes. And, again, it would be encoded differently for each individual so how could I read yours?

What about people who have lost limbs.  They still may have phantom limb syndrome where they feel like they still have it in place.  Could this mean their ghost would be fully limbed?

There could be another reason we don't get dinosaur ghosts.  The land masses have changed and they may all be wandering around under the Pacific.

Mysteryshopper
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Ian Topham wrote:IThere
Ian Topham wrote:

IThere could be another reason we don't get dinosaur ghosts.  The land masses have changed and they may all be wandering around under the Pacific.

Plenty of dinosaur bones have been found in the UK. Your point relies on a ghost being tied forever to a fixed latitude and longitude rather than a bit of the Earth's crust. There is an implicit assumption there about the nature of ghosts.

So what theory of ghosts are you proposing? :)

Incidentally, if ghosts were tied yo a fixed point relative to the geomagnetic field, many would have wandered all over the place even in the last few centuries.



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