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A Man Carried Through The Air By The Fairies

The following folk tale by Edward Hamer appeared in a publication entitled 'Parochial Account of Llanidloes' (1877) and repeated in Elias Owen's 'Welsh Folklore' (1973). Read More »

Church of St David, Llanfaes

The Grade II listed Church of St David in Llanfaes dates from 1923-25. This church replaced an earlier one built in 1859. It has been suggested that this Victorian St David’s that was constructed by J Clayton, was built beside the remains of an earlier medieval church. The church at Llanfaes has been recorded as early as 1291 in the 'Ecclesia de Lanmays'. Read More »

Church of St. Meilig, Llowes and Moll Walbee's Stone

The medieval church of St Meilig was rebuilt in 1853, though the bottom of the tower may be a remnant of the earlier building. Inside the church is a standing stone with a cross carved into it, which possibly dates from the 6th or 7th century. The stone which is thought to have stood at or near the site of a 6th century monastery founded by St Meilig at Croesfeilig. Read More »

Craig Y Nos Castle

Craig-y-Nos Banner

Craig-y-Nos Castle is nestled away in the scenic Brecon Beacons National Park. Once the home of famous opera singer Adelina Patti (10 February 1843 – 27 September 1919), the castle has a reputation as one of the most notorious haunted venues in the United Kingdom. Read More »

Dylife Lead Mine

Dylife was a small lead mining community which was totally abandoned when the mine closed at the end of the 1800’s. Read More »

Ellyllon

According to 'British Goblins' (1881) by Wirt Sykes; 'The Ellyllon are the pigmy elves who haunt the groves and valleys, and correspond pretty closely with the English elves. Read More »

Ghost Of Elizabeth Gething

The following tale concerning a haunting in Ystradgynlais was printed in British Goblins (1881) by Wirt Sykes. 'In the parish of Ystradgynlais, in Breconshire, Thomas Llewellyn, an innkeeper's son, was often troubled by the spirit of a well-dressed woman, who used to stand before him in narrow lanes, as if to bar his passage, but he always got by her, though in great alarm. Read More »

Harper's Pool

A pool in the river Teifi called 'The Pool of the Harper' is said to be haunted by the ghost of a harper, who drowned there many years ago. He makes his presence felt by wistful songs that can only be heard by certain people.

Haunted Wales: A Guide To Welsh Ghostlore by Richard Holland

Haunted Wales

The ghosts of Wales are bold and memorable, forceful in character often terrifying and sometimes even dangerous. In a new book by Richard Holland and published by The History Press you realise that Wales is a fearfully haunted place with possibly more ghosts and goblins than in England or any other country. Read More »

Henrhyd Falls (Sgwd Henrhyd)

The Henrhyd Falls, situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park, is the tallest waterfall in South Wales, dropping approximately ninety feet. It occurs where the Nant Llech, tumbles over the ‘Farewell Rock’. Access is via a steep footpath into the gorge, through deciduous woodland, from the car park at Coelbren off the A4221. Read More »

Llyn Ebyr

Edwin Sidney Hartland gives the following tale about how a mother retrieved her twin children after they had been replaced by fairy changelings in his ‘The Science of Fairy Tales’ (1891)’ ‘Water's antagonism to witches is notorious; and ample use was made of it in the old witch trials. Read More »

Llyn Y Fan Fach

Traditionally the lake is thought to have been bottomless, and it has long been associated with fairies. Read More »

Powis Castle

Powis Castle dates back to the 13th century when it was a medieval stronghold for the Welsh princes of Powys. It is now the ancestral home for the Earls of Powis and has been continuously lived in for over seven hundred years. It is only to be expected that a castle with such a long history would have acquired a few ghosts over the years.

The Ghosts: Read More »

Richard The Tailor Of Langattock Crickhowell

The town of Crickhowell and the village of Langattock face each other over the River Usk. Wirt Sykes in his ‘British Goblins’ (1881) recounts the following story of a gentleman called Walter Jones being taught a lesson by a local inn keeper thought to dabble in witchcraft. Read More »

River Honddu Water Horse

The River Honddu (Afon Honddu) runs through the Black Mountains in the Brecon Beacons starting at the Vale of Ewyas and said, according to folklore, to be the home of a small grey Ceffyl-dwr (a welsh water horse similar to a Kelpie). Read More »

Satan Outwitted In Trefeglwys

The following account appeared in 'Y Brython', a popular Welsh-language periodical devoted to literature, antiquities and folklore published between 1858 and 1863. It was later reprinted in Elias Owen's 'Wesh Folkore' (1887). Read More »

Sing Sorrow Sorrow edited by Gwen Davies

Sing Sorrow Sorrow

‘Sing Sorrow Sorrow is a chilling collection of supernatural myth and otherworldly horror stories from some of Wales' most exciting new and established authors. Read More »

St Gwynog’s Church, Aberhafesp

St Gwynog’s Church in Aberhafesp currently dates from 1857 when the earlier church was rebuilt. Though the first parish registers date from 1578, there are records of a church here in Aberhafesp dating back to 1254. The church is dedicated to the 6th century Gwynog (Born 511 – Died 580), the son of Gildas. Read More »

St Tysilio's Church, Llandysilo

The Gothic St Tysilio's in Llandysilo dates from 1867 but is built on the foundations of a much earlier church. Thought to be founded by St Tysilio early in the 7th century there are records of a chapel here dating back as early as 1254 and 1291. It was probably this earlier building that was reputedly haunted by a spirit which was according to folklore exorcised. Read More »

The Brigands Inn

Brigand Inn

The 15th century Brigands Inn is reputedly haunted by an unidentified female apparition who has apparently been witnessed several times. This family run renovated coaching inn dating from 1488, acquired its name from the buildings association with the Mawddy Bandits or Red Bandits or the 'red haired thieves of Mawddwy' who were active in this region during the 16th century. Read More »

The Dream of Rhonabwy

Lady Charlotte Guest published the first English translation of The Mabinogion and below is how the tale of The Dream of Rhonabwy appeaed in it [1877]. Read More »

The Lake Vyrnwy Obelisk

The Lake Vyrnwy Obelisk

Lake Vyrnwy Dam and the associated waterworks was constructed in the 1880s to provide drinking water for Liverpool and Merseyside. Today the area is a nature reserve and conservation area popular with the many visitors who come to enjoy the magnificent scenery. Read More »

The Shepherd of Myddvai

LynnY Fan Fach

This tale tells how a young shepherd won and lost a fairy bride from Lynn y Fan Fach (Van Vach), the fairy lake at the foot of Bannau Sir Gaer in the Brecon Beacons. This version was collected and told by Joseph Jacobs and appeared in his book Celtic Fairy Tales published in 1892 (David Nutt). Read More »

The Thirteen Treasures of the Island of Britain

These treasures are ancient magical items of Welsh tradition that are mentioned in 15th and 16th Century manuscripts. Most of the treasures are from and in ‘The North’ of the Island of Britain. Read More »

Trichug

Trichrug or Pen-y-bicws is a hill in the Brecon Beacons standing 415m in height. It is associated with both a stone throwing giant and local fairies. Read More »



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