Holy Cross and St Mary Church , Quainton

Dating from the 14th century, the parish church of St Mary the Virgin and Holy Cross was reputedly involved in a strange experience in the late 17th century. The incident involved Susanna (nee Brawne) (died circa 1671) and her husband Sir John Dormer of Lee Grange (died Leghorn (Livorno) 1675), who are interred in the church.

Whiteleaf Hill Burial Mound

An oval neolithic burial mound dating from 3,750-3,100 B.C. can be foun don Whiteleaf Hill. Within the mound was buried a single male. Animal bones and pottery shards found within indicate evidence of ceremonial feasting when the mound was constructed. It was first excavated by Sir Lindsay Scott in the 1930’s and the again by Oxford Archaeology between 2002 and 2006.

A4146 Monk, Edlesborough

A phantom monk in a black habit is said to have been witnessed by a car driver near the parish church of St Mary the Virgin as he drove through Edlesborough on the A4146 in the 1970’s.  The monk vanished when the driver stopped and shone a torch at it.

Slaptonbury Mill

There is a ghost legend attached to Slaptonbury Mill, of which not even ruins remain.

A4146 Crossroads, Edlesborough

The Dagnall road near Edlesborough may be haunted by a phantom black car.  In 1961 Mr Stanley Prescott from Dunstable and his wife were driving along the A4146 when, as they approached the B489 junction, Mr Prescott was forced to take his car off the road and through a hedge by an oncoming vehicle.

Jack the Leather, Edlesborough

Jack the Leather was a highwayman who is said to have been caught whilst hiding in the stables of Church Farm. According to tradition, soldiers noticed the lathered farm horses that Jack had been exercising each night by riding them around the farm’s spring-fed moat. He was captured and dragged to a Gibbet at either Ivinghoe Beacon, or Gallows Hill.

Dick Turpin, Edlesborough

On dark nights it is said that the ghost of Dick Turpin rides the road leading from the 13th century St Mary the Virgin Parish Church towards the Tring Road. Local legend says he would hide in the attic of Butler’s Manor at Northall and watch for potential coaches to hold up.

Gallows Hill, Ivinghoe

Gallows Hill stands 615 feet above sea level and it is thought to have the remains of a Bronze Age barrow on it, bones from which were discovered in the 19th century. At one post medieval time the hill is said to have mounted a gallows from which it gets its name.  It is from this time that the story of its haunting is thought to derive from.