The Fairy Funeral

The following story entitled ‘The Fairy Funeral’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘THE parish church of Lelant is curiously situated amidst hills of blown sand, near the entrance of the creek of Hayle.

White Hare of Looe

A ghostly white hare is said to run from the direction of Talland to The Jolly Sailor Inn in Looe. Thought to be an ill omen if seen, the white hare is thought to be the ghost of a girl who committed suicide.

Cherry of Zennor

The following story complete with footnotes was entitled ‘The Adventure of Cherry of Zennor (1)’ and appeared in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890]

Mr William’s Experience (1812), Scorrier House

On 11th May 1812, Spencer Perceval (Born 1 November 1762) was shot and killed by John Bellingham, making him the only British Prime Minister to be assassinated in office. There is a story that this assassination was foreseen in a dream by Mr Williams of Scorrier House in Redruth, Cornwall.

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The Undreamed Region: Barrows In Folklore & Archaeology

Hills, mounds and burial sites. Places which have a timeless allure. Such places can be seen and regarded as mythically liminal, a place that it is not a place. A place outside of time. A place where the living freely walk with the dead. Barrows are just such places.

Spectral Coach of Blackadon

Lanreath is well known for the tale of a spectral coach which was said to haunt the area. The following account that appeared in ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ by John Ingram (1897), describes the encounter between the exorcist, Richard Dodge, and the phantom coach.

Dorothy Durant, Ghost of Botathen

There is an old story concerning the ghost of Dorothy Durant who was said to haunt a field at Botathen (Botathan, Botaden)in the 17th century. The following account appeared in The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain (1897) by John Ingram who in turn took it from the History of Cornwall by Hitchins and Drew (1824).

The Lost Child

Robert Hunt in his ‘Popular Romances of the West of England; or, The Drolls, Traditions, and Superstitions of Old Cornwall’ (1865) gives an account of the lost child of Trefonick which was given to him thirty years earlier by an old woman of the parish.