Sykes Street, Hull

The following account appeared in ‘County Folk-Lore Volume VI – Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding Of Yorkshire (1911)’ edited by Eliza Glutch.

Llyn-Yr-Avave or the Beaver Lake

According to Oliver’s Beverley and The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893),‘The origin of Bever-lee, the town of Beverley, which was in the ancient wood Deira, is referred to in the old religious ceremony of drawing the shrine, or emblematical Beaver, out of the lake in the wood, and placing it in security on an eminence in the sight of the assembled

Ye Olde White Harte, Hull

Ye Olde White Harte on Silver Street is a Grade II listed building with strong links to the English Civil War and a reputation of being haunted. Built around 1550, the building became a public house in the late 18th century. However, it was in this building, in the "plotting parlour" above the back bar, that on 23 April 1642, a fateful decision was made.

Riding The Stange

‘This is another species of popular punishment which formerly prevailed at Beverley, but is now deservedly fallen into desuetude. The ceremony was performed when a husband had been guilty of beating his wife, or vice versa ; and was as follows.

Awd Simmon Beeather

A Glossary of Words used in Holderness (1877) gives the following description for the word Simmon and mentions an associated ghost. ‘Simmon, pounded brick or tiles, used by brick-layers for colouring the mortar. Beating simmon was formerly the hard labour punishment in Beverley Borough Gaol.

Fimber Crossroads

The following extract is taken from ‘History of Fimber. A treatise on Agricultural Improvements, Memories of Remarkable Events and Village Tales’ by T. Edmondson (1857), in which he describes local folklore concerning the haunting of the crossroads at Fimber.

Ba’l Hill, Neolithic Round Barrow

The Neolithic round barrow at Wold Newton stands nearly three meters and has a diameter of around 40 meters. It stands beside an intermittently flowing stream known as the Gypsey Race. It was excavated in 1894 by JR Mortimer.

Gypsy Race

The Gypsy runs from the Great Wold Valley and out into the North Sea at Bridlington. Bad fortune is said follow when the Gypsey Race flows. The following description of the Gypsey Race was published as response to a letter in the Bridlington Free Press on Wednesday 21 May 2008.