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Feather Death Related Folklore

According to The Ghost World by T. F. Thiselton Dyer (1893) ‘The presence of pigeon or game feathers is said to be another hindrance to the exit of the soul; and, occasionally, in order to facilitate its departure, the peasantry in many parts of England will lay a dying man on the floor.

Brede Place

Originally dating from the 14th century, Brede Place is a Grade II listed building that was then rebuilt in the 15th century by Sir Robert Oxenbridge, father of Sir Goddard Oxenbridge, the Bede Giant. For a time the house was associated with smugglers and some haunt like stories were told to keep the locals away.

Brede Ogre

According to local legend, a child eating ogre in Brede Park was identified as the Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, Sir Goddard Oxenbridge of Brede Place. Said to have stood seven foot tall (most likely just over 5 foot), he was also known as the Brede Giant. Oxenbridge died on 10 February 1531 and his tomb (constructed in 1537) can be found in the Parish Church of St George in Brede.

St Andrew’s Parish Church, Alfriston

St Andrew’s Parish Church is a Grade I listed building dating back to 1370. It was built in a cruciform shape and is referred to as The Cathedral of the Downs. There is a siting legend attached to St Andrews Church dating back to its original construction.

Deans Place Country Hotel

Dating from the 17th century and formerly being the moated manor house of a large farm estate, the Grade II listed Deans Place has been a hotel since the start of the 20th century. The building has a reputation of being haunted by a female figure in a long blue dress or robe.

Ye Olde Smugglers Inne, Alfriston

Partially dating from 1358, and originally known as The Market Cross Inn or Market Cross House, this public house changed its name in the 1920’s and now reflects its association with Stanton Collins, the leader of the Alfriston gang and their smuggling activities.

The White Way, Alfriston

The White Way is a road running between Alfriston and Seaford, which according to local legend has a reputation for being haunted. According to tradition, one Midsummers Eve, a young man, who was the heir to the Chowne* estate was killed with his dog (possibly a white terrier) near Dean’s Place and quickly buried in a shallow grave.