Category: Legends

Kirkstall Abbey

The following tunnel legend was published in Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson (1879). ’A…..tale is told of Kirkstall Abbey, near Leeds.

Dallinghoo Treasure

In ‘County Folk-Lore: Suffolk’ (1893), Lady Camilla Gurdon gives the following story ‘Beneath a post of a high gate in Dallinghoo lies a hidden treasure; the ghost of its former owner haunts the spot and twelve clergymen have unitedly failed to lay the spirit.’

Llanilar Church

The following account from ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939) by Elliott O’Donnell (27 February 1872 – 8 May 1965) refers to a Devil tradition associated with three churches in close proximity, though he does not name the individual church.

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Lancashire Folk by Melanie Warren

I’ve known Mel for over 20 years, meeting though ASSAP while investigating paranormal cases in the North of England. We share a passion for collecting stories and coming from Lancashire myself I have been looking forward to reading Mel’s new book and revisiting some of the old stories, coming across some new ones..and of course, I can now add the book to my collection!

Sexhow Ghost

According to ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). ‘Mr. G. M. Tweddell thus relates the history of an apparition which with fitting retributive justice haunted a certain Yorkshire farmer.

Tunnel Between Finchale Abbey and Durham Cathedral

The following tunnel legend was printed in ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders’ by William Henderson (1879). ‘There was a wild legend in my native city of a subterranean passage between Finchale Abbey and the cathedral of Durham, and of an attempt to penetrate it.

Brede Place

Originally dating from the 14th century, Brede Place is a Grade II listed building that was then rebuilt in the 15th century by Sir Robert Oxenbridge, father of Sir Goddard Oxenbridge, the Bede Giant. For a time the house was associated with smugglers and some haunt like stories were told to keep the locals away.

Brede Ogre

According to local legend, a child eating ogre in Brede Park was identified as the Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, Sir Goddard Oxenbridge of Brede Place. Said to have stood seven foot tall (most likely just over 5 foot), he was also known as the Brede Giant. Oxenbridge died on 10 February 1531 and his tomb (constructed in 1537) can be found in the Parish Church of St George in Brede.

Parish Church of St Nicholas, Canewdon

The Parish Church of St Nicholas in Canewdon dates from the 14th century and according to tradition and local legend, has associations with ghosts, witchcraft and the Devil. The following description of Canewdon was published on 13 October 2014 in the Essex Chronicle within an article by Emily Talbut entitled ‘The 14 most haunted places in Essex to visit this Hallowe’en’

Bignor Hill

According to Sylvanus Urban’s ‘Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Chronicle (1816)‘The old inhabitants of the place have a tradition now nearly lost that a large Dragon had its den on Bignor Hill and that marks of its folds were to be seen on the hill a relick of remote antiquity and of Celtic origin.’