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Lancashire Gazetteer

Barnoldswick Phantom Bomber

Avro Lancaster

Does a phantom Avro Lancaster bomber haunt the skies over Barnoldswick? In 2004 a flurry of sightings were reported which led to a series of newspaper reports in The Craven Herald.  Read More »

Black Abbey, Accrington

Three Cistercian monks were murdered by the inhabitants of Accrington in the late 13th century and according to tradition a local haunting dates back to this time. 'A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6' (1911) gives the following information about the historical events.
Read More »

Burscough Priory

Robert Fitz-Henry, Lord of Lathom (Born 1135) founded the Augustinian Burscough Priory around 1190. It was dissolved during the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VIII circa 1536 and today very little remains of the building. Read More »

Castle de Bergh

There is or rather was a very ancient castle in Lancashire near Liverpool called Castle de Bergh which belongs to a noble family of that name. Many years ago the possessor of the castle Mr de Burgh died and the castle was then let out to various of the tenantry among whom was a carpenter. Read More »

Cheetham Close Stone Circles

The remains of the early Bronze Age Cheetham Close stone circle lies between Chapeltown and Egerton. It measured 18.5 metres and according to a survey by Dryden in 1850, consisted of 6 stones. By 1871 the site was broken up by a tenant of Turton Tower angered by the visitors it was attracting.

Clitheroe Castle

It has been suggested in Roby’s Traditions of Lancashire, that the Motte and Bailey Clitheroe Castle may date back to before 1086, being built by Roger de Poictou (also known as Roger Pictavensis). Roger was a supporter of King William I and was granted 398 Saxon Manors following the Norman invasion of 1066. Read More »

The Feytin' Ape

feytin_ape

Here’s a tall tale I collected from a local character when I was researching folklore in Oldham, Lancashire. While the tale is purely fictional it does include some half truths and was ‘doing the rounds’ of the local pubs. Read More »

The Green-faced Ghost

An article by Melanie Warren, first published in Poulton Life Magazine, winter 1996

In December 1936, the Blackpool Evening Gazette carried an article which began excitedly; 'Carleton Ghost? A Layton taxi-driver claims he has seen a ghost with a green face, near the gates of Carleton Crematorium..' Read More »

Grove Mill (Bygone Times)

Whether you have an eye for antiques or just want a stroll down memory lane, I can heartily recommend a visit to Bygone Times at the Grove Mill in Eccleston. The 17th century mill also has a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

Habergham Hall and the Lady’s Lament

Nothing now remains of Habergham Hall which stood on the western boundary of Burnley not far from the cemetery. Ancestral home of the Habergham family, the following extract concerning traditions surrounding the last Mrs Habergham appeared in ‘Lancashire Legends’ (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

Hoghton Tower

Dating from 1560-1565, Hoghton Tower is a Grade I listed fortified manor house situated on the highest hill in the Hoghton area. The following tale by John Roby was published in his ‘Traditions of Lancashire’ in 1872. He refers to it being left to decay and by the middle of the 19th century it was derelict. Read More »

Hornby Castle

The Grade I listed Hornby Castle is a private residence and is not open to the public, though the castle gardens are opened up a few times a year for special events. Read More »

Hornby Park Mistress and Margaret Brackin

John Harland and T. T. Wilkinson give the following account of a haunting tradition in Lancashire Folk-lore (1867). 'The following story is told and believed by some persons in Hornby. The Park Mistress may be supposed to be the ghost of Lady Harrington, who committed murder three hundred years ago. Margaret Brackin was born in 1745, and died in 1795. Read More »

Hynd Brook House

According to John Fahey in an Accrington Observer article entitled 'Spooky tales of a haunted Hyndburn' (30 October 2003). 'Sue Brown, manager at Hyndbrook House sheltered accommodation in Dale Street, Accrington, claims residents often see a spectre of a man dressed in a brown suit. Read More »

Mecure Blackburn Dunkenhalgh Hotel and Spa

The 175 room, 4 star Mercure Blackburn Dunkenhalgh Hotel, is thought to be haunted by Lucette, a pretty, young, French governess for the Petre family who lived at Dunkenhalgh Hall when it was still a home. Read More »

Meg Shelton the Fylde Witch

Meg Shelton (Mag Shelton or Margery Hilton) the Fylde Witch (Fylde Hag) who died in 1705 is said to be buried beneath a large boulder in the grounds of St Anne's Church, Woodplumpton. She was buried in a vertical position, head first with the boulder placed on top to prevent her from digging herself out of the grave, which apparently she had done twice previously. Read More »

Miley Railway Tunnel, Preston

The Miley Tunnel running under Preston is 862 yards long and linked the Longridge line to the main Preston line. Opening in around 1840 for freight, the first passenger trains used the tunnel in 1856, though these stopped by 1930. Goods traffic also declined and by the 1980’s the line was unused. The tracks are still present but they are overgrown and the tunnel is abandoned. Read More »

Old Madam Of Egerton Hall

There was an Egerton Hall which dated from 1826 and was built by Edmund Ashworth. This building was demolished in 1956. However, in ‘Lancashire Legends’ (1873), John Harland and T T Wilkinson refer to a haunted, older Egerton Hall, which was all but demolished by their time of writing and dating from possibly the 17th century. Read More »

Paranormal Lancashire by Daniel Codd

Paranormal Lancashire by Daniel Codd

Being born and bred in Lancashire I've grown up surrounded by the rich folklore, ghost stories and paranormal experiences that are embedded in the county, call me bias, but we have some of the most diverse and well documented stories from the famous Pendle witches to headless boggarts, lonely ghosts, black cat sightings and UFO's. Read More »

Peg O'Nell of Waddow Hall, Waddington

The Grade II listed 17th century Waddow Hall has been owned by the Girl Guides Association since 1928. There is an old folk tradition associated with Waddow Hall and the ghost of Peg O'Nell or Peg o' th' Well. The following account of the tradition is extracted from 'Lancashire Folk-lore' (1867) by John Harland and T. T. Wilkinson. Read More »

Queensway, Accrington

According to John Fahey in his article entitled 'Spooky tales of a haunted Hyndburn' (Accrington Observer, 30 October 2003) 'A house in Queensway, Church, has terrified residents for years. Read More »

Raven’s Castle

Raven’s Castle is a cluster of rocks on the moors about 6 miles north of Slaidburn and close to the Lancashire border with Yorkshire. John Roby in his ‘Traditions of Lancashire’ (1872) set the following folk tale amongst these rocks. Read More »

Smithills Hall, Bolton

The hall - one of the oldest in Lancashire - has a footprint in its flagstones said to have been created when a protestant martyr was interrogated at the hall. The footprint is said to become bloody on the anniversary of his martyrdom. Read More »

St Leonards, Walton-le-Dale

Edward Kelly

St Leonard’s Church in Walton-le-Dale was according to folklore the location that Edward Kelly and Dr John Dee chose to famously summon a spirit, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Read More »

St Margaret's Church, Hornby

The Grade I listed St Margaret's Church in Hornby was founded by Sir Edward Stanley, Lord Mounteagle, in 1514, the tower of which still stands. (An earlier church had been on the site dating from around 1338). Read More »

Sykes Lumb Farm

There is nothing now standing of Sykes Lumb Farm though it probably stood near to the present day Sykes Holt. The farm dated back to the the War of the Roses (1455 – 1485) and gained a reputation for being haunted by a boggart that guarded over a hidden treasure. The story has been published several times. Read More »

The Beast of Lytham

Beast of Lytham

The Beast of Lytham hit the headlines as a strange creature was seen on several occasions in woodland around Lytham St Anne's. The following is an exert from at article by Jaya Narain for the Daily Mail dated 6 May 2005. Read More »

The Duckworth Hall, Oswaldtwistle

John Fahey gave the following account of the haunting at The Duckworth Hall in his 30 October 2003 article entitled 'Spooky tales of a haunted Hyndburn' which was was published in the Accrington Observer. Read More »

The Dule Upo' Dun

‘A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6’(1911) mentions that ‘On the road from Clitheroe to Waddington, near Brungerley Bridge, once stood an inn known as the 'Dule upo' Dun', from its sign representing the Devil galloping madly along upon a dun horse. Read More »

The Dun Cow & The Old Rib

In 'Lancashire Legends' (1873), John Harland shares the following piece of folklore.  'The anonymous writer of "Curious Corners round Preston," states that the "Old Rib " is the name giyen to an old farm in the township of Whittingham, in the parish of Kirkham, five miles north of Preston. Read More »

The Plough, Ormskirk

The following article by Jamie Bowman entitled 'Car crash awakens The Plough pub’s ghost according to landlady' was published in the Ormskirk Advertiser on 19 July 2012. Read More »

The Siege of Lathom

Siege of Lathom

Nothing now remains of the original Lathom House, the last Royalist stronghold in Lancashire, which was besieged by Parliamentarian forces for three months in 1644. Read More »

The Skulls of Timberbottom Farm and Bradshaw Hall

Timberbottom Farm (demolished), Bradshaw Church, Bradshaw Hall (demolished 1950's) and Turton Tower are all associated with the story of two skulls that have been linked to haunt like experiences. Read More »

The Sun Inn, Chipping

The 18th century Sun Inn is said to be haunted by the apparition of Lizzie Dean, a scullery maid that ended her own life in the attic of the pub on the day her lover married her best friend. Read More »

The Written Stone, Dilworth

A large inscribed stone measuring eight feet long, two feet wide and one and a half feet deep was placed beside a old road (now known as Written Stone Lane) in Dilworth during the 17th century. The reason why the stone was placed is unknown, though several stories have grown up around it. The following account was published in 'Lancashire Legends' (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

Towneley Hall, Burnley

Although the Towneley family lived here since the 13th century, the present Grade I listed Towneley Hall dates from the 14th and 16th century. No longer a stately home, Towneley Hall houses Burnley's Art Gallery & Museum and perhaps a few ghosts. Read More »

Turton Tower

Now owned by Blackburn and Darwen Council, the reputedly haunted 15th century Turton Tower is open to the public and hosts a number of events organised by the Friends of Turton Tower. Read More »

Unbaptized Children

Stillborn babies and infants that had not been baptized could not always be buried on consecrated ground and a wealth of folklore developed around this delicate subject, some of it with a distinct North and South divide. Read More »

Waddington Hall

Waddington Hall near Clitheroe is one of the locations that sheltered King Henry VI following his defeat at the Battle of Hexham in 1464 and it was shortly after leaving here that his was captured and taken to the Tower of London. The following story entitled ‘The Grey Man of the Wood or The Secret Mine’ appeared in John Roby’s ‘Traditions of Lancashire’ (1872) Read More »

Warton Crag

Warton Crag is a large limestone hill with a few pieces of interesting folklore as described in Lancashire Folk-lore by Harland and Wilkinson 1867: “On the lower declivity of Warton Crag, in the parish of Warton (which abuts on Morecambe Bay and the Westmorland border), commanding a beautiful and extended prospect of the bay, a seat called 'The Bride's Chair’ was resorted to on the day Read More »

Weeton Cairn Boggart

In the 1876 book entitled ‘History of the Fylde of Lancashire’ by John Porter, reference is made to an extensive barrow or cairn near Weeton Lane Heads which was accidentally opened. This burial chamber had the reputation of being haunted by a boggart or hairy ghost. Read More »

Whalley Abbey

In 1296, Cistercian monks moved from Stanlow Abbey and founded Whalley Abbey, with the first stone being laid by Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln, Baron of Pontefract, 10th Baron of Halton, Lord of Denbigh and 7th Lord of Bowland (Born 1251 – Died February 1311). Following the dissolution of the monasteries, Whalley Abbey was closed in 1537 and now stands in ruins. Read More »

Wigan Big Cat (2011)

On 14 February 2011 an article entitled 'Panther on the Prowl' appeared on the Wigan Today website concerning the sighting of a large black cat in Bryn  and animal remains being found in a local recreation area. Read More »

Witch's Cottage, Barley

In December 2011 a 17th century cottage complete with an entombed mummified cat was unearthed in Barley, near Pendle Hill, an area which is of course famous for the Pendle Witches. Read More »

Wycoller Hall

The ruin of the sixteenth century Wycoller Hall is Grade II listed building and a scheduled ancient monument with a reputation of being haunted. The following account of the one of the halls ghost stories was published in 1873 in John Harland & T T Wilkinson's 'Lancashire Legends'. Read More »

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