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Ghost Finder London – App

Looking for the spookier side to London? Then this is the must-have app for you…

London has a rich haunted heritage, and from well-known ghosts to some of the more obscure, this app features over 300 haunted locations around the city, the map uses your phone’s GPS to bring the spooks to you!

The Elms, Smithfield

Smithfield haled a fairly prominent place in medieval London. Not only was it the site of a famous market and a place where Royalty held their tournaments, the Elms at Smithfield was also well known as a place of execution and it is thought that some of those who were cruelly killed at this spot may haunt it still.

St Magnus the Martyr Church

St Magnus the Martyr was the second church to be damaged during the Great Fire of London in 1666 and was subsequently rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (born 20 October 1632 – died 25 February 1723) at a cost of £9,580.

King Lud & Ludgate

Ludgate is commonly accepted as having been named after the mythical King Lud, who according to legend founded London. King Lud who is said to have been buried at Ludgate appeared in texts such as Geoffrey of Monmouths (born circa 1100 – died circa 1155) Historia Regum Britanniae (The History of the Kings of Britain).

Smithfield Horned Figure (17th Century)

The sale of meat at Smithfield can be traced back over 800 years and in the 17th century an apparition of a horned figure reputedly terrorized the area leaping over the butchers stalls. When some of the butchers hit the figure with their cleavers and knives the blades apparently they passed straight through him without leaving a wound.

Puddle Dock (1674)

In 1674 a publication entitled ‘News from Puddle-Docke in London, or, A Perfect particuler of the strange apparitions and transactions that have happened in the house of Mr. Edward Pitts next door to the still at Puddle-Dock’ was printed. As the title suggests it concerned the reported haunting Edward Pitts home.

The London Stone

Mounted behind an iron grill in the wall of 111 Cannon Street (originally known as Candlewick Street) can be found what could be described as one of London’s most ancient monuments, The London Stone (also known as The Brutus stone).

Old Red Cow, Smithfield

The Old Red Cow (or Ye Olde Red Cow as it was known) is considered to be one of Smithfield’s oldest pubs, though its current building dates from 1854. It is said that the apparition of a former landlord, sometimes referred to as Dick O’Shea, was seen in the year following his death (1981) sitting watching customers from an upstairs balcony.