Hinton Ampner House

Hinton Ampner House is a National Trust property and dates from 1790. The original house was about 160 feet to the North of this building and demolished in 1793 and it is this older Tudor residence that acquired a reputation of being haunted during the 18th century.

Warblington Castle

An octagonal turret or tower from the gatehouse is all that remains of the Grade II listed Warblington Castle, which could have been described as a moated manor house. Situated on private land, the castle is not accessible, which reputedly does not stop its ghostly visitors.

Warblington Parsonage

The parsonage in Warblington was said to be haunted in the late 17th century. Though I do not believe the building to exist today, I understand it may have stood on Pook Lane. Below is how the story was published in 1897 in ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ by John Ingram.

St. Catherine’s Hill

St. Catherine’s Hill is a prominent chalk hill not far from Winchester in Hampshire’s South Downs. The hill appears to have had a significant place in local life since early times, and indeed the remains of an iron age hillfort can still be seen there today, hinting that St. Catherine’s Hill was of military, economic and perhaps spiritual importance.

Ewshott House

The following account was published in ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ by John Ingram (1897).  Major Edward Moor, the author, among other works, of the Hindu Pantheon, in its day a valued authority upon Indian antiquities, in 1841 published a brochure on the " Bealing Bells." This little hook not only furnished a full account of the disturbances ascrib

Beaulieu Abbey

The reputedly haunted monastery of St Mary of Beaulieu was a Cistercian Abbey founded in 1204 by King John and granted to the house of and populated by monks from the Abbey of St. Mary of Citeaux, the French mother house of the Cistercian order.

Hackwood House

According to The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain by John Ingram (1897), the Saunders Newsletter which was a daily paper that running between 1755 and 1879 (being published daily from 1777) carried the following story concerning an experience at Hackwood House in one of it’s April 1862 publications.

Moyles Court

Mentioned in the Domesday Book (1086) as being held by Cola the Huntsman, Moyles Court is now a private school on the edge of the New Forest in Hampshire. It was once the home of Lady Alice Lisle who was executed for sheltering traitors following the Monmouth Rebellion which has been described as judicial murder.