Category: Wells

Collinson’s Well

‘The church was dedicated in honour of St. John the Baptist. Little remains to tell either of the castle or well on Hutton Common, but both were popularly known as having been named after one Collinson. There was a tradition, with every probability of truth, that when King Charles marched his men on the road through this parish he turned aside and drank out of Collinson’s Well.

The Star, York Street

The following description about the haunting of the The Star’s building is extracted from an article by Alex Evans entitled ‘Halloween: Sheffield’s Top 10 most haunted places revealed’ which was published in The Star on 26 October 2015. ‘Campo

Holwell Mouth Holy Well

The well at Holwell Mouth is the source of the River Smite and described as being a chalybeate spring. It is said that the well was visited for its medicinal waters and there used to be a stone table and seats for the visitors to use. In 1403 the vicarage was granted land called Well Dole and there are records of a Dole building receiving 10 shillings a year in 1790 for its upkeep.

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Lancashire Folk by Melanie Warren

I’ve known Mel for over 20 years, meeting though ASSAP while investigating paranormal cases in the North of England. We share a passion for collecting stories and coming from Lancashire myself I have been looking forward to reading Mel’s new book and revisiting some of the old stories, coming across some new ones..and of course, I can now add the book to my collection!

St John’s Well, Harpham

The well of St John of Beverley can be found beside the road on the east side of Harpham. St John (died 7 May 721) was born in Beverley and on his feast day (7th May) it is decorated and a procession of the choir and congregation of Beverley Minster make their way to it from the church in Harpham.

Cobbler’s Well

The following story of Cobbler’s Well was printed in ‘County Folk-Lore Volume VI – Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ which was edited by Eliza Glutch. ‘In a hollow on Beverley Westwood is a stone trough, into which a spring of exceedingly cold pure water once flowed abundantly.

Mother Ludlam’s Cave

Mother Ludham’s Cave, was so named after the White Witch that was said to live in it. This small sandstone cave can be found in the Wey Valley and is also associated with the ruined Cistercian Waverley Abbey, or more correctly the spring inside it is associated with the monks that lived there. This spring was known as Ludwell and later St Mary’s Well.

Tobar Vacher. (Tobar Mhachar)

The following description is taken from Folklore [A Quarterly Review of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). ‘This is a fine well, dedicated to St. Machar, near the present farm of Corriehoul, Corgarff, Strathdon. A Roman Catholic chapel was at one time near it, and the present graveyard occupies the site of the chapel.

Tobar-Fuar-Mòr (The Big Cold Well)

The following description of The Big Cold Well is taken from Folklore [A Quarterly Review of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). ‘This well is situated at the bottom of a steep hill in a fork between two small streams on the estate of Allargue, Corgarff. There are three springs that supply the water, distant from each other about a yard.