Category: Wells

Giant’s Cave, Edenhall

At Giant’s Cave, near Eden Hall, it has been the custom from time immemorial for the lads and lasses of the neighbouring villages to collect together on the third Sunday in May, to drink sugar and water, when the lasses give the treat: this is called Sugar-and-Water Sunday. They afterwards adjourn to the public house, and the lads return the compliment in cakes, ale, punch, etc.

Holwell Holy Well

"HERE was a holy well or spring in the village of Holwell, on the borders of Bedford and Hertfordshire; unfortunately both history and site have been forgotten by the villagers at Holywell.”—A. C. G. Cameron, H.M. Geological Survey. [The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893)]

Old Brine, Nantwich

On Ascension Day, the old inhabitants of Nantwich piously sang a hymn of thanksgiving for the blessing of the Brine.

St Mungo’s Well, Bromfield

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘In Bromfield there were plenty of legends connected with this well. It is situated in a field near the churchyard. The present vicar, the Rev. R. Taylor, with reverent care, had it cleared and enclosed with a circular vaulted dome of stone, on which he placed an appropriate inscription.

St Cuthbert’s Well, Bromfield

In ‘The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England’ by Robert Charles Hope (1893) we are informed that; ‘In the parish of Bromfield, in the neighbourhood of Blencogo, “on the common to the east of that village, not far from Ware-Brig, near a pretty large rock of granite, called St.

Lady Well, Thirsk

“An old historian of the town says: "In the marsh near the church flows a spring of pure and excellent water, commonly called Lady Well, doubtless a name of no modern description." Yorks. Folk-lore, p. 199. . [The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893)]

St Johns Well, Sutton-on-the-Forest

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘About a mile from the nunnery*, at the corner of the wood called St. John’s Wood, was formerly an ancient building, consisting of a small dome of stone and brick over a spring, well known in the neighbourhood as "St.

Collinson’s Well

‘The church was dedicated in honour of St. John the Baptist. Little remains to tell either of the castle or well on Hutton Common, but both were popularly known as having been named after one Collinson. There was a tradition, with every probability of truth, that when King Charles marched his men on the road through this parish he turned aside and drank out of Collinson’s Well.

The Star, York Street

The following description about the haunting of the The Star’s building is extracted from an article by Alex Evans entitled ‘Halloween: Sheffield’s Top 10 most haunted places revealed’ which was published in The Star on 26 October 2015. ‘Campo

Holwell Mouth Holy Well

The well at Holwell Mouth is the source of the River Smite and described as being a chalybeate spring. It is said that the well was visited for its medicinal waters and there used to be a stone table and seats for the visitors to use. In 1403 the vicarage was granted land called Well Dole and there are records of a Dole building receiving 10 shillings a year in 1790 for its upkeep.