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Sykes Lumb Farm

There is nothing now standing of Sykes Lumb Farm though it probably stood near to the present day Sykes Holt. The farm dated back to the the War of the Roses (1455 – 1485) and gained a reputation for being haunted by a boggart that guarded over a hidden treasure. The story has been published several times. Read More »

The Beast of Lytham

Beast of Lytham

The Beast of Lytham hit the headlines as a strange creature was seen on several occasions in woodland around Lytham St Anne's. The following is an exert from at article by Jaya Narain for the Daily Mail dated 6 May 2005. Read More »

The Duckworth Hall, Oswaldtwistle

John Fahey gave the following account of the haunting at The Duckworth Hall in his 30 October 2003 article entitled 'Spooky tales of a haunted Hyndburn' which was was published in the Accrington Observer. Read More »

The Dule Upo' Dun

‘A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6’(1911) mentions that ‘On the road from Clitheroe to Waddington, near Brungerley Bridge, once stood an inn known as the 'Dule upo' Dun', from its sign representing the Devil galloping madly along upon a dun horse. Read More »

The Dun Cow & The Old Rib

In 'Lancashire Legends' (1873), John Harland shares the following piece of folklore.  'The anonymous writer of "Curious Corners round Preston," states that the "Old Rib " is the name giyen to an old farm in the township of Whittingham, in the parish of Kirkham, five miles north of Preston. Read More »

The Plough, Ormskirk

The following article by Jamie Bowman entitled 'Car crash awakens The Plough pub’s ghost according to landlady' was published in the Ormskirk Advertiser on 19 July 2012. Read More »

The Siege of Lathom

Siege of Lathom

Nothing now remains of the original Lathom House, the last Royalist stronghold in Lancashire, which was besieged by Parliamentarian forces for three months in 1644. Read More »

The Skulls of Timberbottom Farm and Bradshaw Hall

Timberbottom Farm (demolished), Bradshaw Church, Bradshaw Hall (demolished 1950's) and Turton Tower are all associated with the story of two skulls that have been linked to haunt like experiences. Read More »

The Sun Inn, Chipping

The 18th century Sun Inn is said to be haunted by the apparition of Lizzie Dean, a scullery maid that ended her own life in the attic of the pub on the day her lover married her best friend. Read More »

The Written Stone, Dilworth

A large inscribed stone measuring eight feet long, two feet wide and one and a half feet deep was placed beside a old road (now known as Written Stone Lane) in Dilworth during the 17th century. The reason why the stone was placed is unknown, though several stories have grown up around it. The following account was published in 'Lancashire Legends' (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

Towneley Hall, Burnley

Although the Towneley family lived here since the 13th century, the present Grade I listed Towneley Hall dates from the 14th and 16th century. No longer a stately home, Towneley Hall houses Burnley's Art Gallery & Museum and perhaps a few ghosts. Read More »

Turton Tower

Now owned by Blackburn and Darwen Council, the reputedly haunted 15th century Turton Tower is open to the public and hosts a number of events organised by the Friends of Turton Tower. Read More »

Unbaptized Children

Stillborn babies and infants that had not been baptized could not always be buried on consecrated ground and a wealth of folklore developed around this delicate subject, some of it with a distinct North and South divide. Read More »

Waddington Hall

Waddington Hall near Clitheroe is one of the locations that sheltered King Henry VI following his defeat at the Battle of Hexham in 1464 and it was shortly after leaving here that his was captured and taken to the Tower of London. The following story entitled ‘The Grey Man of the Wood or The Secret Mine’ appeared in John Roby’s ‘Traditions of Lancashire’ (1872) Read More »

Warton Crag

Warton Crag is a large limestone hill with a few pieces of interesting folklore as described in Lancashire Folk-lore by Harland and Wilkinson 1867: “On the lower declivity of Warton Crag, in the parish of Warton (which abuts on Morecambe Bay and the Westmorland border), commanding a beautiful and extended prospect of the bay, a seat called 'The Bride's Chair’ was resorted to on the day Read More »

Weeton Cairn Boggart

In the 1876 book entitled ‘History of the Fylde of Lancashire’ by John Porter, reference is made to an extensive barrow or cairn near Weeton Lane Heads which was accidentally opened. This burial chamber had the reputation of being haunted by a boggart or hairy ghost. Read More »

Whalley Abbey

In 1296, Cistercian monks moved from Stanlow Abbey and founded Whalley Abbey, with the first stone being laid by Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln, Baron of Pontefract, 10th Baron of Halton, Lord of Denbigh and 7th Lord of Bowland (Born 1251 – Died February 1311). Following the dissolution of the monasteries, Whalley Abbey was closed in 1537 and now stands in ruins. Read More »

Wigan Big Cat (2011)

On 14 February 2011 an article entitled 'Panther on the Prowl' appeared on the Wigan Today website concerning the sighting of a large black cat in Bryn  and animal remains being found in a local recreation area. Read More »

Witch's Cottage, Barley

In December 2011 a 17th century cottage complete with an entombed mummified cat was unearthed in Barley, near Pendle Hill, an area which is of course famous for the Pendle Witches. Read More »

Wycoller Hall

The ruin of the sixteenth century Wycoller Hall is Grade II listed building and a scheduled ancient monument with a reputation of being haunted. The following account of the one of the halls ghost stories was published in 1873 in John Harland & T T Wilkinson's 'Lancashire Legends'. Read More »



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