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Queensway, Accrington

According to John Fahey in his article entitled 'Spooky tales of a haunted Hyndburn' (Accrington Observer, 30 October 2003) 'A house in Queensway, Church, has terrified residents for years. Read More »

Raven’s Castle

Raven’s Castle is a cluster of rocks on the moors about 6 miles north of Slaidburn and close to the Lancashire border with Yorkshire. John Roby in his ‘Traditions of Lancashire’ (1872) set the following folk tale amongst these rocks. Read More »

Rivington Castle

Based upon a plan made by E. W. Cox in 1892, Rivington Castle is a folly and reconstruction of William II de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby’s, 13th century Liverpool Castle. Rivington Castle dates from 1912, when the building work began. It was built by William Hesketh Lever, 1st Viscount Leverhulme (Born 19 September 1851 – Died 7 May 1925) and can be found in Lever Park. Read More »

Rivington Pike

Rivington Pike is a local landmark and site of an early warning beacon, possibly one of a system dating back to 1139. It was still in use in 1588 when it was lit to warn of the Spanish Armarda. According to tradition, the Rivington Pike area is associated with a demonic spectral horseman. Read More »

Smithills Hall, Bolton

The hall - one of the oldest in Lancashire - has a footprint in its flagstones said to have been created when a protestant martyr was interrogated at the hall. The footprint is said to become bloody on the anniversary of his martyrdom. Read More »

St Leonards, Walton-le-Dale

Edward Kelly

St Leonard’s Church in Walton-le-Dale was according to folklore the location that Edward Kelly and Dr John Dee chose to famously summon a spirit, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Read More »

St Margaret's Church, Hornby

The Grade I listed St Margaret's Church in Hornby was founded by Sir Edward Stanley, Lord Mounteagle, in 1514, the tower of which still stands. (An earlier church had been on the site dating from around 1338). Read More »

St Peters Church, Burnley

The original church on this site possibly dated from 1122, though the oldest part of the current St Peters is the 15th century West Tower. Read More »

Sykes Lumb Farm

There is nothing now standing of Sykes Lumb Farm though it probably stood near to the present day Sykes Holt. The farm dated back to the the War of the Roses (1455 – 1485) and gained a reputation for being haunted by a boggart that guarded over a hidden treasure. The story has been published several times. Read More »

Th' Skriker (Shrieker)

The following story entitled "Th' Skriker (Shrieker)" was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878).  'On a fine night, about the middle of December, many years ago, a sturdy-looking young fellow left Chipping for his cottage, three or four miles away, upon the banks of the Hodder. Read More »

The Beast of Lytham

Beast of Lytham

The Beast of Lytham hit the headlines as a strange creature was seen on several occasions in woodland around Lytham St Anne's. The following is an exert from at article by Jaya Narain for the Daily Mail dated 6 May 2005. Read More »

The Bee Hole Boggart

There is story that many years ago in the Burnley area, a woman known as Old Bet was snatched and killed by The Bee Hole Boggart.  Bits of her skin were then said to have been found bung on a rose bush.

The Duckworth Hall, Oswaldtwistle

John Fahey gave the following account of the haunting at The Duckworth Hall in his 30 October 2003 article entitled 'Spooky tales of a haunted Hyndburn' which was was published in the Accrington Observer. Read More »

The Dule Upo' Dun

‘A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6’(1911) mentions that ‘On the road from Clitheroe to Waddington, near Brungerley Bridge, once stood an inn known as the 'Dule upo' Dun', from its sign representing the Devil galloping madly along upon a dun horse. Read More »

The Dun Cow & The Old Rib

In 'Lancashire Legends' (1873), John Harland shares the following piece of folklore.  'The anonymous writer of "Curious Corners round Preston," states that the "Old Rib " is the name giyen to an old farm in the township of Whittingham, in the parish of Kirkham, five miles north of Preston. Read More »

The Parish of St Andrew, Leyland

The Parish of St Andrew in Leyland dates from 1220, though it is thought a church has been on this site since the 12th Century. The church has had several alterations over the centuries, but what I want to concentrate on is the initial construction of the first church and the siting legends associated with it. Read More »

The Plough, Ormskirk

The following article by Jamie Bowman entitled 'Car crash awakens The Plough pub’s ghost according to landlady' was published in the Ormskirk Advertiser on 19 July 2012. Read More »

The Sands of Cocker

The following story entitled ‘The Sands of Cocker’ was published in ‘Goblin Tales of Lancashire’ by James Bowker (1878). Read More »

The Siege of Lathom

Siege of Lathom

Nothing now remains of the original Lathom House, the last Royalist stronghold in Lancashire, which was besieged by Parliamentarian forces for three months in 1644. Read More »

The Skulls of Timberbottom Farm and Bradshaw Hall

Timberbottom Farm (demolished), Bradshaw Church, Bradshaw Hall (demolished 1950's) and Turton Tower are all associated with the story of two skulls that have been linked to haunt like experiences. Read More »

The Sun Inn, Chipping

The 18th century Sun Inn is said to be haunted by the apparition of Lizzie Dean, a scullery maid that ended her own life in the attic of the pub on the day her lover married her best friend. Read More »

The Unbidden Guest

The following folktale entitled 'The Unbidden Guest' was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878). 'On a little lane leading from the town of Clitheroe there once lived a noted 'cunning man,' to whom all sorts of applications were made, not only by the residents, but also by people from distant places, for the fame of the wizard had spread over the whole country side. Read More »

The Written Stone, Dilworth

A large inscribed stone measuring eight feet long, two feet wide and one and a half feet deep was placed beside a old road (now known as Written Stone Lane) in Dilworth during the 17th century. The reason why the stone was placed is unknown, though several stories have grown up around it. The following account was published in 'Lancashire Legends' (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

Towneley Hall, Burnley

Although the Towneley family lived here since the 13th century, the present Grade I listed Towneley Hall dates from the 14th and 16th century. No longer a stately home, Towneley Hall houses Burnley's Art Gallery & Museum and perhaps a few ghosts. Read More »

Turton Tower

Now owned by Blackburn and Darwen Council, the reputedly haunted 15th century Turton Tower is open to the public and hosts a number of events organised by the Friends of Turton Tower. Read More »



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