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St. George's Church, York

On George Street stands the Roman Catholic Church of St George, across from the site of an earlier 16th century St George’s Church which fell into ruin. With the graveyard (which still survives) of this original St George’s was thought to be buried Richard "Dick" Turpin (Died 7 April 1739). Read More »

St. Mary's Church, Scarborough

St Mary's Church is a Grade I listed building dating from the 12th century, though much of it was rebuilt in the 17th century after it was damaged during the siege ofScarborough Castle during the English Civil War in 1644. In ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939), Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) refers to a woman keeping vigil at St Mary’s on St Mark’s Eve. Read More »

St. Wilfrid's Parish Church, Calverley

St. Wilfrid's Parish Church is a Grade II listed building, the earliest parts of which date from the 11th or 12th century, though there may have been an earlier structure on the site. Read More »

Stocksbridge Bypass

The Stocksbridge Bypass linking the M1 Motorway and the A628 Woodhead Pass Road was opened in May 1988. Since its construction the road has been associated with strange experiences and a ghostly monk. Read More »

Stokesley

The Wise man of a stokesley a man called Wrightson is reputed to have been a great seer and healer. The 7th son of a 7th daughter he was especially famed for healing cattle and his far sight. He died in the 1900s. Many villages had such wise men and women famed for their powers.

Swinsty Hall

Swinsty Hall dates from the 16th Century and can be found on the banks of Swinsty Reservoir (built 1874). Read More »

Tadcaster Tiger (2006)

In 2006 there was a tiger scare in North Yorkshire around Tadcaster. The following article appeared on the BBC News Website [23 June 2006] entitled 'Police alert over 'tiger' reports' and includes details of a sighting on the B1223, also known as Boggart Lane. Read More »

Tancred Hospital

In the village of Whixley is a large house that once belonged to the Tancred family. The last heir to this family stated in his Will that he was not to be buried underground and instead that he was to be interred in the family home, which he was. His coffin became a point of local interest and speculation arose that his ghost must haunt the house, though there is no evidence of this. Read More »

The Abbey Inn, Newlay

The Abbey Inn at 99 Pollard Lane has been described as one of Leeds most Haunted pubs. Dating from the mid 19th century, the Inn was also been used as a mortuary until the 1950s, which may explain to some why it seems to have numerous ghosts. Read More »

The Blinded Giant, Dalton

The following tale of a North Yorkshire giant appeared in 'English Fairy and Other Folk Tales' by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890] who cited 'Notes on the Folk-Lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders.' Read More »

The Bridestones

The Bridestones are a set of natural weathered stones that are thought to have been used for ancient worship. A weathered horned head is carved into one of the stones, the date of the carving unknown.

Directions: To the East of the A169 Northeast of Lockton.

The Cardigan Arms, Leeds

On 13th October 2006 strange experiences was reported by three separate women at the Cardigan Arms, 364 Kirkstall Road, Leeds. One of the women briefly saw the reflection of a middle-aged/elderly woman with long, straight grey hair in the mirror of the ladies toilet. No one was there when she turned around. One of the girls waited for a cubicle to be vacated. Read More »

The Cock and Bottle, York

According to a local paper, George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham who used to live on Skeldergate, York, haunts The Cock and Bottle. The haunting has included the sound of door being broken, the apparition of an ugly man, and other sightings. The ghost is said to be evil and to hates crucifixes.

The Devil's Apronful

In his  ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ (1888), Rev Thomas Parkinson gave the following account of how the stones known as The Devil's Apronful got their name. Read More »

The Devil's Arrows

The Devil's Arrows are three Neolithic Megaliths - the tallest of which is 23 feet high - standing in a crooked alignment of around 580 feet. The fourth stone was destroyed in the 16th century, when Camden noted that it had been pulled down by treasure seekers.

In legend they were thrown by the Devil from Howe Hill to destroy Aldborough, hence their common name. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Burnsall

There stories throughout Britain of the Devil building bridges and Rev Thomas Parkinson in his 'Yorkshire Legends and Traditions' (1888) gives the following account for the bridge over the River Dibb at Burnsall. Read More »

The Golden Fleece, York

The Golden Fleece is a Grade II listed building which claims to be York's most haunted pub. According to their website 'Possibly the most famous ghost is Geoff Monroe, a Canadian airman who was staying at the pub in room four when he died in 1945, by throwing himself or falling out of one of the windows. Read More »

The Manor Castle, Sheffield

This pub sits in the grounds of the now ruined Manor Castle (or Manor Lodge) in Sheffield and is haunted by the apparition of a figure. When encountered by Jack Wright, the new Landlord he moved his family straight back out after three weeks of being continuously haunted, if not by seeing the figure then by feeling a presence. Read More »

The National Railway Museum

The National Railway Museum is the worlds largest museum dedicated to rail travel and covers over 300 years of worldwide history. One of the many exhibits, a sleeping car, is supposed to be haunted by an unknown prescence.

The Old Queen’s Head, Pond Hill

The Old Queens Head public house is a Grade II listed building that dates from 1475 and is thought to be the oldest domestic building in Sheffield. Read More »

The Palace, Kirkgate

Originally a merchants house built in 1741, The Palace had become a registered Inn by 1841, possibly due to the Beerhouse Act of 1830 which enticed private residences to be become public houses. Read More »

The Parish Church of All Saints North Street, York

All Saints North Street

All Saints is considered to be York's finest medieval church and has one of the best stained glass displays in Britain. Read More »

The Slingsby Serpent

In 1619 the antiquary Roger Dodsworth (born 1585 – died 1654) gave an early account of the dragon: ‘The tradition is that between Malton and this town there was some time a serpent, that lived upon prey of passengers, and which this Wyvill and his dog did kill, when he received his death-wound. Read More »

The Star, York Street

The following description about the haunting of the The Star’s building is extracted from an article by Alex Evans entitled ‘Halloween: Sheffield’s Top 10 most haunted places revealed’ which was published in The Star on 26 October 2015. ‘Campo Lane, in the city centre near the Cathedral, is the dividing line between ‘old Sheffield’ and the newer half o Read More »

The Strines Inn, Bradfield

The Strines Inn is a Grade II listed building which historically has its roots in the 13th century. The Worrall family built a manor house here in 1275 though this was rebuilt and enlarged around 1560. The Inn is situated on the Mortimer Road, which was a Turnpike Road between Grindleford and Penistone built by Hans Winthrop Mortimer (Born 1734 - Died 1807), Member of Parliament for Shaftesbury. Read More »



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