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Buried Treasure


Alcock's Arbour (aka Devil's Bag of Nuts)

There are two stories associated with this conical hill just off the road between Stratford and Alcester known as the Devil's Bag of Nuts and Alcock's Arbour. One 21 September which is the known as the Devil's Nutting Day, Satan was collecting nuts when he was surprised by the Virgin Mary. Read More »

Ballyheigue Castle

Designed by Richard Morrison in 1810, Ballyheigue Castle was a grand mansion and home of the Crosbie family. Now mostly a shell, surrounded by a golf course which opened in 1996. It ha been burned down twice, once by accident in 1840 and again on 27th May 1921 as part of the troubles and the destruction of buildings linked to British Imperialism. Read More »

Bardsey Island

Bardsey Island (P)

The island is also known as the island of the currents and the saints. There are said to be the graves of 20,000 saints interred on the island, and legend suggests that anybody buried here will not go to hell no matter how wicked his deeds. Read More »

Bearnshaw Tower and Lady Sybil

The 17th century Bearnshaw Tower (or Bernshaw Tower) is said to have collapsed in the 1860's when its foundations were dug away by people hunting for hidden treasure. This pele tower though is best known for its association with a witch, Lady Sybil, who's story below appeared in 'Lancashire Legends' (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson. Read More »

Bodewryd Standing Stone (a.k.a. Carreglefn, Maen Pres)

The Bodewryd standing stone is approximately between eleven and twelve feet tall, and stands alone in a field on the Plas Bodewryd Estate. It is also known as Carreglefn (Smooth Stone), and as Maen Pres (Brass Stone). Read More »

Bryn Gwyn Standing Stones

These are two giant standing stones, probably two of the tallest in Wales, standing thirteen feet and ten feet tall. They are situated in a field, and actually form part of the field boundary. The stones were recorded as being part of a stone circle the 17th Century, but the circle was allegedly demolished in 19th Century, by locals looking for buried treasure. Read More »

Bryn Myrddin (Merlin's Hill)

The hill is one of many places in Britain reputed to be the prison of Merlin, where Merlin lies asleep in a cave awaiting the call to return and help his fellow countrymen. According to tradition it is possible to hear his groans from under the hill if you listen hard enough. In legend Merlin was born in Carmarthen 2 miles away from the hill. Read More »

Cadbury Castle

This large hillfort has a plethora of traditions attached to it, most notably that it is the site of the legendary Camelot, the stronghold of Arthur. There is a distinct possibility that the historical Arthur - probably a sixth century war leader - had his base here, as the Iron Age hillfort was reoccupied and refortified around this time. Read More »

Caractacus Stone

This standing stone has a number of traditions associated with it, it looks very much like a Neolithic standing stone, although sources suggest that it actually dates to the fifth century, during the end of the Roman occupation. The name of the stone is certainly of Roman origin although it may have been old during the Roman period. Read More »

Castle Hill, Thetford

Castle Hill (Castle Mound or Military Parade) is the remains of Thetford's second castle, a 12th century motte and bailey castle which replaced the towns earlier 11th century Red Castle. Read More »

Down House, Tavistock

In his 'English Fairy and Other Folk Tales (1890), Edwin Sidney Hartland gives the following account of a ghost story and buried treasure in the Tavistock area. Read More »

Hannah Beswick of Birchen Bower, Hollinwood

There used to be a large manor house (now demolished) called Birchen Bower in Hollinwood in Oldham, which was famous for its alleged haunting by a Grey Lady called Hannah Beswick. Read More »

Hulme Hall

Hulme Hall (1)

There are several buildings known as Hulme Hall including one in Allostock, a Grammar School in Cheadle Hulme and a hall of residence for Manchester University. However, the long lost Hulme Hall which was the seat of the Prestwich family is thought to have a hidden treasure protected by occult powers. Read More »

Long Meg and Her Daughters

Long Meg Portrait

A weight of awe, not easy to be bourne,
Fell suddenly upon my spirit - cast
From the dread bosom of the unknown past
When first I saw that family forlorn..
Read More »

Lordscairnie Castle

The castle has links with the legend of the more infamous Glamis Castle. Read More »

The Lyme Regis Black Dog

Black Dogs

This old story provides an explanation for the naming of the Black Dog Inn near Uplyme in Devon. The black dog seems to be a spirit guardian of treasure. Read More »

Middleham Castle

Middleham Castle

The castle is reputed to be the site of a buried hoard of treasure, to find it you must run a round the castle three times, and where you stop the treasure will be found. Unfortunately there is no indication of where you should start.

Directions: Off the A6108 to the South of Leyburn.

Image Gallery

Netley Abbey

Netley Abbey was a Cistercian House founded in 1239 by Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester though he died before it was completed. Henry II took a keen interest in the Abbey and became its royal patron. Read More »

Ogmore Castle

A ghostly White Lady is supposed to have killed a greedy treasure seeker in these ruins. On his first visit he had encountered the ghost and tried to speak to her for which he was rewarded a few coins from the treasure she guards. He made a return visit to alleviate her of the burden of looking after so much treasure, but was caught by the White Lady who scratched him. Read More »

Shaftesbury Abbey

Shaftesbury Abbey

Shaftesbury abbey was a Benedictine nunnery that was founded by Alfred the Great around AD888, King Alfred's daughter was also the first Abbess of Shaftesbury. Read More »

Sinnoden Hill

Sinnoden Hill

Sinnoden Hill standing next to Harp hill, was once a Roman Fort during the period of their occupation. Legend suggests that there is buried treasure on the hill, hidden in Roman times in an area called the money pit. Read More »

Stevenston’s Legend of the Hidden Gold

After the routing of the Spanish Armada in 1588, many of the Spanish Galleons escaped and tried to find North West passage through the North Sea: around the tip of Scotland and back to Spain. Read More »

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

This thirteenth century fortified manor house is supposedly the hiding place of a treasure chest full of gold, which was hidden by two giants. The legend says the treasure is guarded by a raven which sits atop the chest. The key to the chest was apparently lost when one of the giants dropped it in the moat. Read More »

The Giants of Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle (1)

This legend belongs to the area around Stokesay Castle in Shropshire, and was first recorded in Shropshire Folklore, A Sheaf of Gleanings by Burne and Jackson London 1883. What follows is a short adaptation of the original folklore. Read More »

Sykes Lumb Farm

There is nothing now standing of Sykes Lumb Farm though it probably stood near to the present day Sykes Holt. The farm dated back to the the War of the Roses (1455 – 1485) and gained a reputation for being haunted by a boggart that guarded over a hidden treasure. The story has been published several times. Read More »



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