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Irthington Holy Well

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘At Irthington, rising in the churchyard boundary, was the well called “How,” or “Ha,” evidently a corruption of...

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Toddel Well

‘No one now seeks Toddel Well in the township of Longrigg. It was formerly the belief in this parish that the waters of this well had a similar efficacy to the pool of Bethesda,...

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Bell Hill, Eskdale

To the north of the church (St Catharine’s) is a rock called Bell Hill, where the chapel bell is said to have been hung. It is more likely a relic of the old fire-worship...

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St Ninian’s Well, Brisco

‘Miss Losh*, who will be long remembered in this county for her works of piety and love, extended her protecting care to St. Ninian’s Well at Briscoe, erecting over it a semicircular arch, and...

Giant’s Cave, Edenhall

At Giant’s Cave, near Eden Hall, it has been the custom from time immemorial for the lads and lasses of the neighbouring villages to collect together on the third Sunday in May, to drink sugar and water, when the lasses give the treat: this is called Sugar-and-Water Sunday. They afterwards adjourn to the public house, and the lads return the compliment in cakes, ale, punch, etc.

St Mungo’s Well, Bromfield

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘In Bromfield there were plenty of legends connected with this well. It is situated in a field near the churchyard. The present vicar, the Rev. R. Taylor, with reverent care, had it cleared and enclosed with a circular vaulted dome of stone, on which he placed an appropriate inscription.

St Cuthbert’s Well, Bromfield

In ‘The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England’ by Robert Charles Hope (1893) we are informed that; ‘In the parish of Bromfield, in the neighbourhood of Blencogo, “on the common to the east of that village, not far from Ware-Brig, near a pretty large rock of granite, called St.

Collinson’s Well

‘The church was dedicated in honour of St. John the Baptist. Little remains to tell either of the castle or well on Hutton Common, but both were popularly known as having been named after one Collinson. There was a tradition, with every probability of truth, that when King Charles marched his men on the road through this parish he turned aside and drank out of Collinson’s Well.

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An Interview With Dr Jason Braithwaite

We recently caught up with Dr Jason Braithwaite, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Birmingham with an interest in anomalous experience, hallucinations, and aberrations in self-consciousness. He also has a formidable reputation for being extremely well informed on matters of the brain / mind relationship, and high quality scientific research.

Flookburgh Big Cat (2012)

On 16 July 2012 the following North West Evening Mail story by Ross Tyson entitled ‘Big cat’ spotted on road’ was published.

A COUPLE claim to have spotted a mysterious panther-like big cat while on holiday in the Lakes.