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Henrhyd Falls (Sgwd Henrhyd)

The Henrhyd Falls, situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park, is the tallest waterfall in South Wales, dropping approximately ninety feet. It occurs where the Nant Llech, tumbles over the ‘Farewell Rock’. Access is via a steep footpath into the gorge, through deciduous woodland, from the car park at Coelbren off the A4221. Read More »

Henry Edmund And The Fairies In Llanhilleth

There are many folk tales from Wales concerning fairies carrying people away. One such story is said to have taken place in Llanhilleth (Lanhiddel) and involved Charles Hugh, a person thought to have dealings with them. The following version appeared in British Goblins: Welsh Folk-lore, Fairy Mythology, Legends and Traditions (1881) by Wirt Sykes.
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Here Is The Story Of Llud And Llevelys

The Story of Llud and Llevelys appears in the The Mabinogion and here is the translation published by Lady Charlotte Guest (1877). Read More »

Hollow Demon Oak

A tree known as Derwen Ceubren yr Ellyl (hollow tree of the demons/spirits) used to stand in Nannau Park and it had a reputation of being haunted and evil, for this is the tree in which Owain Glyndwr was, according to legend, supposed to have hidden the body of his cousin Hywel Sele, 8th Lord of Nannau after he had killed him in 1404. Read More »

Holy Well of St Winifred

St Winifride's Holy Well

The healing waters of St Winifred’s (Winifride) Holy Well have attracted pilgrims for over 1300 years and the crypt in which the well lies was stacked with crutches left by the cured invalids until some time in the 1960’s, though can still be seen on display. Read More »

Holyhead UFO

In 1743 a farmer near Holyhead, Anglesey is alleged to have witnessed a 'boat' sailing in the clouds at about 1500 feet. The story appeared in the 'Flying Saucer Review' in 1971.

In Search Of Britain's Haunted Castles by Marc Alexander & Paul Abrahams

In Search Of Britain's Haunted Castles by Marc Alexander & Paul Abrahams

I'm always enthusiastic about new books that take a tour of this country highlighting great places to visit and sites to see, it's even better when the book concentrates on Haunted locations, and in this case focussing on castles across England, Scotland and Wales. Read More »

John Jenkin Devil Summoner

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) gives the following account of a devil summoning ceremony performed by a schoolmaster and renowned conjurer named John Jenkin in Pembrokeshire. Read More »

Kilhwch and Olwen or the Twrch Trwyth

The following is the tale of Kilhwch and Olwen or the Twrch Trwyth as told by Lady Charlotte Guest in her 1877 translation of The Mabinogion. Read More »

King Arthur's Well

King Arthur’s Well is so called, because of the myth connected with it, that the waters derive from King Arthur’s kitchen, and the fat from the meat that was cooked there, floats to the surface at the well. In 1853 a physician from Caernarfon named A. Read More »

Lady Anne Prendergast

In Haunted Wales (2011), Richard Holland quotes an old account of an experience with the reputed phantom of Lady Prendergast. It was the experience of a farmer named Morus Roberts from Croesor Bach who came across the ghost at Gwernydd in Beddgelert parish. Read More »

Lake Bala

Llyn Tegid

Llyn Tegid is Wales’s largest lake being nearly four miles long. It lies in a rift valley running north east to south west, extending down to the sea at Tywyn. The lake is 529 feet above sea level, has a maximum depth of 136 feet and covers an area of 1084 acres. Read More »

Laugharne

A spectral dog known as the Gwyllgi or the 'Dog of Darkness' is said to haunt the town. The dog appears with flaming red eyes, and is said to run from the castle to the town along an old route-way.

Directions: On the A4066

Llanarth Church

Llanarth church is associated with a legend of the Devil; unusually the Devil creeps into the church and tries to steal one of the church bells. (It is more common for him to steal the whole church). In the process of his theft he wakes the vicar who challenges him with the name of Christ. Eventually the Devil concedes, and jumps off the church tower. Read More »

Llanerchymedd UFO (1978)

On 1st September 1978 in Llanerchymedd, Anglesey, some young boys who were playing football saw what they thought was a helicopter land in a field close to where they were playing. They went over out of curiosity and found that it was a white object like a smooth nosed rocket. They went to fetch some adults who also witnessed two 6-foot humanoids in one-piece suits near to the object. Read More »

Llanfihangel Geneu'r Glyn Parish Church

The following legend concerning Llanfihangel Church was give to Elias Owen by Rev. J Felix, vicar of Cilcen, near Mold and subsequently published in his 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887). Read More »

Llangar Church, Corwen

The white washed Llangar Church can be found about a mile from Corwen and can be dated from the late 13th century though it could possibly be as old as the 11th century. Its original name of 'Llan Garw Gwyn' (The Church of The White Deer) possibly alludes to a legend dating back its initial erection. Read More »

Llangelynin Church and The Holy Well of St. Celynin

Llangelynin church is one of the oldest and remotest churches in Wales; it dates from the 12th Century. Saint Celynin might have erected a religious edifice on the site in the 6th Century since St. Celynin’s well is in the corner of the church yard. The well is a small rectangular pool with stone seats and stone walls. It was reputedly famous for its ability to cure sick children. Read More »

Llddwyn Island

This island is connected by a sandy beach to Anglesey, and was home in the Dark Ages to a religious community, founded by the female Saint Dwynwen. St Dwynwen is a patron saint of Welsh lovers, and after her death the island became an important place of pilgrimage. Read More »

Llech Lafar, St Davids

Llech Lafar, a speaking slab of marble by the River Alun is referred to by Wirt Sykes in his ‘British Goblins’ (1881). 'The Talking Stone Llechlafar, or stone of loquacity, served as a bridge over the river Alyn, bounding the churchyard of St. David s in Pembrokeshire, on the northern side. Read More »

Llety’r Filiast

Llety'r Filiast translates into English as "The Lair of the Greyhound Bitch". It is a ruined Neolithic burial chamber situated on the Great Orme. Most of the stone from the cairn has been taken over the years, but it is thought that when it was originally built it would have measured thirty metres long and ten metres wide, and been vaguely egg shaped. Read More »

Lligwy Burial Chamber

The remains of the Lligwy Cromlech probably date from around 5000 BC (late Neolithic period). Access to the main central chamber would have been through a small narrow passage. The massive capstone (supported by eight smaller pillar stones), measures eighteen feet by fifteen feet, and is estimated to weigh twenty-five tons. Read More »

Llindir Inn, Henllan

Llindir Inn, Henllan,Clwyd

The thatched Grade II listed Llindir Inn dates from 1229 and is certainly one of the oldest pubs in Wales. It is reputed to be haunted by a ghost thought to be named Sylvia, the wife of a sailor who strangled her after finding her in the arms of another man whilst on unexpected shore leave. Read More »

Llyn Barfog (The Bearded Lake)

Llyn Barfog is situated in high countryside above the northern banks of the River Dyfi. The lake is isolated, small, and covered with yellow water lilies in the summer. Sir John Rhys in Celtic Folklore suggests that it was originally called Llyn-y-Barfog (The Bearded One’s Lake) referring to some ancient mythical being who would have lived there. Read More »

Llyn Cau

Llyn Cau

The glacial lake of Llyn Cau at Cader Idris is said to be bottomless and according to tradition it is thought to be the home of a lake monster responsible for drowning a man who went swimming in the cold waters. Read More »



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