Category: Witchcraft

The Wise Woman Of Littondale

The following legend of ‘The Wise Woman Of Littondale’ appeared in ‘The Table Book’ (1827) by William Hone (Born 3 June 1780 – Died 8 November 1842) and partially reprinted in ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson (1888).

Witch’s Cottage, Barley

In December 2011 a 17th century cottage complete with an entombed mummified cat was unearthed in Barley, near Pendle Hill, an area which is of course famous for the Pendle Witches.

Byard’s Leap

Black Meg was a man-eating ogress who lived in a cave on the wild and lonely expanse of Ancaster Heath. She terrorised the countryside for miles around, devouring anyone she came across. Her foul, evil spells made the land barren and she used her long iron claws to maul and kill livestock.

Ursula Kemp and the St Osyth’s Witches

In Chelmsford, 1582, fourteen women from St Osyth were put on trial. The charge was witchcraft. Ten of those women faced charges of ‘bewitching to death’. Seperate skeletons found in St Osyth during 1921 were thought to belong to two of these women, executed as witches.

Salem Village Parsonage (1692)

Salem Village (now Danvers) was settled by European farmers from nearby Salem Town in the 1630’s becoming a separate parish in 1672. The Parsonage dated from 1681, and from 1689 when the covenant church was established it was the home of English born Rev Samuel Parris (born 1653 – died 27 February 1720), his family and household slaves.