Hardwick Hall

Hardwick Hall is a country house dating from around 1590 and was built for Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (Born circa 1527 – Died 13 February 1608) (also known as Bess of Hardwick), who was thought to be the richest woman in Elizabethan England after Queen Elizabeth I (Born 7 September 1533 – Died 24 March 1603) herself.

Royal Derby Hospital

On 30 January 2009 The Telegraph published the following story by Chris Irvine entitled ‘Hospital calls in exorcist after ghost spotted’

A hospital has called in an exorcist after staff claimed they were being haunted by a ghost.

Laying A “Ghost” At Loscoe

During road works on Denby Lane, Loscoe, described as having "the unenviable distinction of being one of the worst stretches of road in the country," a local character, Tom Allen, was given the job of night watchman.

Francis Tantum Apparition 1795

The Quaker herbalist, Phebe Howitt nee Tantum, mother of the author William Howitt (18 December 1792 – 3 March 1879) had a strange experience in 1795 when her brother Francis Tantum was killed.

The Devil of Drakelowe

In ‘Collections for a history of Staffordshire’ (1880) we are introduced to the following account of the events surrounding the case know as The Devil of Drakelowe and the abandonment of the hamlet. The story may have its origins in the Anglo Saxon meaning of Drakelow, ‘Dragons Mound’ which may indicate a burial site with a guardian spirit.

The Black Dog, Little Eaton

Little Eaton in Derbyshire has a black dog legend. It is said that the large black animal was a working, hunting hound owned by the last squire of the village, which howled constantly for three days and nights as its master was dying. When the dog ceased howling, the household staff and the villagers knew that the squire had died.

Drum Hill, Little Eaton

There is apparently a legend (or maybe it’s camp fire ghost story) associated with Drum Hill, which is situated on the edge of Little Eaton, although it has undoubtedly been kept alive (and most probably elaborated) by the Scouts and Guides who regularly use the site as a camping ground.

Tunstead Farm

Tunstead farm has a skull named Dickie that had its height of fame during the 19th century. The name seems strange in that legend suggests the skull is actually that of a woman, who was murdered within the house. Before she died she managed to blurt out that it was her wish for her remains to stay within the house forever.

Guildhall Catacombs

Beneath the Guildhall Theatre in Derby are the catacombs, a labyrinth of tunnels that during the Victorian era were used to ferry prisoners between the Police Station at Lock-Up Yard and the Courts of Assizes, held at the Guildhall.

Swarkestone Bridge

At just under a mile in length, the Swarkestone Bridge over the River Trent was originally built in the 13th century and is the longest stone bridge in England. Being a strategic crossing it has been the focus of military action during both the Civil War and the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745 and it is suggested that perhaps some of the soldiers involved hunt the bridge still.