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The West Kennet Long Barrow: Evidence of Occult Activities

Occult Symbol

[Please note the views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Mysterious Britain team]

To the average tourist the West Kennet Long Barrow is another ancient monument to look over and wonder at the way in which it was constructed, with numerous slabs of sarsen stone laid one upon another. Read More »

Tre'r Ceiri (Town of Fortresses)

To the North of Pwllheli, between the main road from Llanaelhaearn to Llithfaen, and the coast, are three peaks known as ‘the Rivals’ in English and ‘Yr Eifl’ in Welsh. Upon the eastern peak is an Iron Age hill fort called Tre’r Ceiri which is regarded by many as the most important prehistoric town in North Wales if not the whole of Europe. Read More »

Trefal Stone

The following article by Nick Dermody about the Trefal Stone appeared on the BBC Wales website on 24 May 2012.

'Archaeologists are to exhume and analyse human bones found under a prehistoric monument only recently identified as a burial site cap. Read More »

Trethevy Quoit or King Arthur's Quoit

Trevethy Quoit

Trevethy Quoit, also known as King Arthur's Quoit, is one of the more impressive burial chambers in Cornwall. Standing at over 15 feet 4.6 Metres. This cromlech dates from the Bronze Age period. The capstone is pierced by a hole, the purpose of which is unknown. Read More »

Twelve Apostles Standing Stones

Twelve Apostles

Situated 1264 feet above sea level, the Twelve Apostles Standing Stones (once known as the Druids Chair and the Druidical Dial Circle) is the second highest ancient monument on Rombald’s Moor and probably dates from 3500-4000 years. Read More »

Ty Mawr hut group (a.k.a. Cytau'r Gwyddelod, or Irish Huts)

These Iron Age remains of circular buildings can be found on Holy Island, near South Stack on Anglesey. The site consists of ten large circular stone rings (the remains of Iron Age huts) on the hillside with nine smaller rectangular structures (probably workshops for metal working) scattered among them, covering an area of up to twenty acres. Read More »

Uffington White Horse and Dragon Hill

Uffington White Horse

The White Horse of Uffington is one of the most impressive sites close to the ancient Ridgeway path, which traverses the steep chalk downs brooding over the Vale of the White Horse. Other sites include Dragon Hill, The Manger and Uffington Castle, which have been the subject of legend and folklore for over a thousand years. Read More »

Veryan

Five circular thatched houses, within the village are supposed to have been designed to ensure that the Devil cannot hide in any corners. Each house is topped with a cross, a further deterrent to the Devil. In actuality they were built by the Reverend Jeremiah Trist for his daughters. The houses are now in private ownership. Read More »

Warton Crag

Warton Crag is a large limestone hill with a few pieces of interesting folklore as described in Lancashire Folk-lore by Harland and Wilkinson 1867: “On the lower declivity of Warton Crag, in the parish of Warton (which abuts on Morecambe Bay and the Westmorland border), commanding a beautiful and extended prospect of the bay, a seat called 'The Bride's Chair’ was resorted to on the day Read More »

Wavertree's Demon Well

According to James Mackinley in ‘Folklore of Scottish Lochs and Springs’ (1893) ‘At Wavertree, in Lancashire, once stood a monastery and beside it was a well. When pilgrims arrived, the occupants of the monastery received their alms. If nothing was given, a demon, chained to the bottom of the well, was said to laugh. Read More »

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy is one of the most impressive and atmospheric Neolithic burial chambers in Britain. Read More »

Weeton Cairn Boggart

In the 1876 book entitled ‘History of the Fylde of Lancashire’ by John Porter, reference is made to an extensive barrow or cairn near Weeton Lane Heads which was accidentally opened. This burial chamber had the reputation of being haunted by a boggart or hairy ghost. Read More »

Westbury White Horse

Westbury White Horse

A conventional looking horse it measures 107 feet tall and 175 feet across. The horse sits below Bratton Hill Iron Age fort. The hillfort has a Bronze Age barrow within its fortifications suggesting an earlier heritage. Read More »

Whispering Knights

The remains of a portal dolmen burial chamber dating from around 4100BC the Whispering Knights can be as evocative as their name suggests, looming from the mist in the cool Warwickshire morning. They stand 5 to 8 feet in height and are close to the Rollright Stones in Oxfordshire with which they share folklore. Read More »

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey 2

Whitby Abbey is one of the most atmospheric locations in England. The desolate ruins stand stark above steep cliffs overlooking the old whaling village of Whitby in North Yorkshire, a testament to the town's former religious significance. Read More »

White Horse Sarsen Stone

Mentioned as a item of possible interest to a visitor of Alton Priors, in the village is a sarsen stone with a copy of the Alton Barnes White Horse carved upon it. Read More »

Winklebury Camp

Local folklore suggests that if you walk around the Iron Age hillfort seven times at midnight, the Devil will appear on a large black horse and grant one wish.

Only brave people should attempt this as the Devil will always try to trick people into losing their souls to him.

Woodhenge

Woodhenge

Woodhenge is much older than Stonehenge and is aligned to the Midsummer sunrise. The monument consisted of concentric rings of tall wooden posts and must have been an impressive sight when it was completed. Rings of concrete markers now mark where the posts would have originally stood. Read More »

The Wrekin

This impressive hill sits in the middle of a rolling landscape and at 1,334 feet is an impressive landmark for miles around. The hill is crowned with the remains of an Iron age Hill fort and it is said that a beacon fire was lit on its summit during the Spanish Armada. Read More »

Y Gyrn Lower Cairn (North)

This is the remains of one of a pair of ancient cairns that bestride the mountain path descending Y Gyrn from the west heading towards the Bryn Cader Faner ancient monument.

Y Gyrn Upper Cairn (South)

This is the remains of one of a pair of ancient cairns that bestride the mountain path descending Y Gyrn from the west heading towards the Bryn Cader Faner ancient monument.

Ynys Seiriol (a.k.a. Puffin Island, Ynys Glannauc, Priestholm and Ynys Lannog)

This island lying off Penmon Point (Trwyn Du) of Anglesey (Ynys Môn) was once known as Priestholm by the Vikings and Ynys Lannog by the Welsh. A charter from 1238AD refers to the canons of the Isle of Glannauch, another name for the island. Read More »

Ysbyty Cynfyn Church

Ysbyty Cynfyn Church

Three miles from Devil’s Bridge is the 19th century Ysbyty Cynfyn Church, which stands in the remains of a stone circle. Two of the stones now act as posts for the gate leading into the churchyard. Another two are set into the church wall itself. The tallest of the stones is in the North of the churchyard and stands 3.4m high. Read More »

Ysgyryd Fawr

The Ysgyryd Fawr is a hill 486 metres in height, found ten miles from the English border. It is the most easterly of the Black Mountains, and is situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park. The name Ysgyryd Fawr pertains to the shape of the hill, indicating that it has been ‘shattered’ and it has often been anglicised from the Welsh to ‘The Skirrid’ in English. Read More »

The Dolphin Hotel, Littlehampton

Ellie and Katie along with their staff have created a warm and friendly pub with a traditional feel and traditional values. They have worked hard to turn the Dolphin into one of the safest, cleanest and most welcoming pubs around. Between them they have nearly 30 years experience in the pub and catering trade. Read More »



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