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The Tarxien Temples

The Tarxien Temples were discovered in 1913 or 1914 by local farmers ploughing the field and the sites thorough excavation began in 1915. A World Heritage Site, the megalithic Tarxien Temples are made up of four interlinked structures dating from between 3600BC and 2500BC. The structures are referred to as the South Temple, East Temple and Central Temple. Read More »

The Twelve Apostles (Stone Circle)

The twelve apostles, although the largest stone circle in Scotland and the fifth in Britain, tends to be overlooked because it is not visually that impressive. The circle consists of eleven squat boulders of a probable twelve, constructed in a flattened circle, some 88M in diameter at its widest. Read More »

The Undreamed Region: Barrows In Folklore & Archaeology

Hills, mounds and burial sites. Places which have a timeless allure. Such places can be seen and regarded as mythically liminal, a place that it is not a place. A place outside of time. A place where the living freely walk with the dead. Barrows are just such places. Read More »

The Well of Heads (Tobar nan Ceann)

Well of Heads

The monument which stands by the roadside above this ancient well was erected in 1812, its gory carving of a hand holding a dagger and seven severed heads commemorating an incident that took place in 1665. Read More »

The Well Of The Holy Rood, Stenton

The 16th century Well of the Holy Rood at Stenton has a legend attached to its finial which resembles a rosetted cardinal's hat. The legend states that the tenure of Beil depends upon the well keeping its hat. Read More »

The West Kennet Long Barrow

West Kennet Long Barrow Sketch

West Kennet Long Barrow is one of the many prehistoric monuments that are part of the Avebury complex of Neolithic sites. It is one of the most impressive and well-preserved burial chambers in Britain, as well as being one of the most visited. Read More »

The West Kennet Long Barrow: Evidence of Occult Activities

Occult Symbol

[Please note the views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Mysterious Britain team]

To the average tourist the West Kennet Long Barrow is another ancient monument to look over and wonder at the way in which it was constructed, with numerous slabs of sarsen stone laid one upon another. Read More »

Tobar Vacher. (Tobar Mhachar)

The following description is taken from Folklore [A Quarterly Review of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). ‘This is a fine well, dedicated to St. Machar, near the present farm of Corriehoul, Corgarff, Strathdon. A Roman Catholic chapel was at one time near it, and the present graveyard occupies the site of the chapel. Read More »

Tobar-Fuar-Mòr (The Big Cold Well)

The following description of The Big Cold Well is taken from Folklore [A Quarterly Review of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). ‘This well is situated at the bottom of a steep hill in a fork between two small streams on the estate of Allargue, Corgarff. There are three springs that supply the water, distant from each other about a yard. Read More »

Tobar-na-glas a Coille (The Well in the Grey Wood)

'This well lies near the old military road, near the top of the hill that divides the glen of Corgarff from Glengairn. In a small knoll near it lived a spiteful Spirit that went by the name of Duine-glase-beg, i.e., the Little Grey Man. He was guardian of the well and watched over its water with great care. Read More »

Tre'r Ceiri (Town of Fortresses)

To the North of Pwllheli, between the main road from Llanaelhaearn to Llithfaen, and the coast, are three peaks known as ‘the Rivals’ in English and ‘Yr Eifl’ in Welsh. Upon the eastern peak is an Iron Age hill fort called Tre’r Ceiri which is regarded by many as the most important prehistoric town in North Wales if not the whole of Europe. Read More »

Trefal Stone

The following article by Nick Dermody about the Trefal Stone appeared on the BBC Wales website on 24 May 2012.

'Archaeologists are to exhume and analyse human bones found under a prehistoric monument only recently identified as a burial site cap. Read More »

Trethevy Quoit or King Arthur's Quoit

Trevethy Quoit

Trevethy Quoit, also known as King Arthur's Quoit, is one of the more impressive burial chambers in Cornwall. Standing at over 15 feet 4.6 Metres. This cromlech dates from the Bronze Age period. The capstone is pierced by a hole, the purpose of which is unknown. Read More »

Twelve Apostles Standing Stones

Twelve Apostles

Situated 1264 feet above sea level, the Twelve Apostles Standing Stones (once known as the Druids Chair and the Druidical Dial Circle) is the second highest ancient monument on Rombald’s Moor and probably dates from 3500-4000 years. Read More »

Ty Mawr hut group (a.k.a. Cytau'r Gwyddelod, or Irish Huts)

These Iron Age remains of circular buildings can be found on Holy Island, near South Stack on Anglesey. The site consists of ten large circular stone rings (the remains of Iron Age huts) on the hillside with nine smaller rectangular structures (probably workshops for metal working) scattered among them, covering an area of up to twenty acres. Read More »

Uffington White Horse and Dragon Hill

Uffington White Horse

The White Horse of Uffington is one of the most impressive sites close to the ancient Ridgeway path, which traverses the steep chalk downs brooding over the Vale of the White Horse. Other sites include Dragon Hill, The Manger and Uffington Castle, which have been the subject of legend and folklore for over a thousand years. Read More »

Veryan

Five circular thatched houses, within the village are supposed to have been designed to ensure that the Devil cannot hide in any corners. Each house is topped with a cross, a further deterrent to the Devil. In actuality they were built by the Reverend Jeremiah Trist for his daughters. The houses are now in private ownership. Read More »

Warton Crag

Warton Crag is a large limestone hill with a few pieces of interesting folklore as described in Lancashire Folk-lore by Harland and Wilkinson 1867: “On the lower declivity of Warton Crag, in the parish of Warton (which abuts on Morecambe Bay and the Westmorland border), commanding a beautiful and extended prospect of the bay, a seat called 'The Bride's Chair’ was resorted to on the day Read More »

Wavertree's Demon Well

According to James Mackinley in ‘Folklore of Scottish Lochs and Springs’ (1893) ‘At Wavertree, in Lancashire, once stood a monastery and beside it was a well. When pilgrims arrived, the occupants of the monastery received their alms. If nothing was given, a demon, chained to the bottom of the well, was said to laugh. Read More »

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy is one of the most impressive and atmospheric Neolithic burial chambers in Britain. Read More »

Weeton Cairn Boggart

In the 1876 book entitled ‘History of the Fylde of Lancashire’ by John Porter, reference is made to an extensive barrow or cairn near Weeton Lane Heads which was accidentally opened. This burial chamber had the reputation of being haunted by a boggart or hairy ghost. Read More »

Westbury White Horse

Westbury White Horse

A conventional looking horse it measures 107 feet tall and 175 feet across. The horse sits below Bratton Hill Iron Age fort. The hillfort has a Bronze Age barrow within its fortifications suggesting an earlier heritage. Read More »

Whispering Knights

The remains of a portal dolmen burial chamber dating from around 4100BC the Whispering Knights can be as evocative as their name suggests, looming from the mist in the cool Warwickshire morning. They stand 5 to 8 feet in height and are close to the Rollright Stones in Oxfordshire with which they share folklore. Read More »

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey 2

Whitby Abbey is one of the most atmospheric locations in England. The desolate ruins stand stark above steep cliffs overlooking the old whaling village of Whitby in North Yorkshire, a testament to the town's former religious significance. Read More »

White Horse Sarsen Stone

Mentioned as a item of possible interest to a visitor of Alton Priors, in the village is a sarsen stone with a copy of the Alton Barnes White Horse carved upon it. Read More »



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