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Crossraguel Abbey

Abbey from Tower

The ruins of this relatively little known abbey are remarkably intact, and stand in a part of Ayrshire steeped in history. As well as being historically interesting there are many enigmas associated with the abbey, which could well be worth further research. There may have been a Pictish site here, and some people suggest that the abbey may have a Templar connection. Read More »

Devil's Ditch, Garboldisham

The Devil's Ditch which possibly dates from the Iron Age, though was probably recut in the Middle Saxon period, is a two long ditch with low flanking banks. Read More »

The Devil's Dyke

Two giant earthworks named the Devil's Dyke and the Slad, enclose and area of around 40 hectares to the South of St Albans. The area was excavated in 1932 by Sir Mortimer Wheeler, and the ditch was found to have had an original depth of nearly thirteen metres making it a huge undertaking. Read More »

Din Lligwy (Ancient Village)

Din Lligwy

The ruins of Din Lligwy on the outskirts of Moelfre are the remains of an ancient fortified homestead which was abandoned about 1,600 years ago. Covering an area of about half an acre, enclosed by ash and sycamore trees, the site consists of the foundations of several buildings of varying shapes and sizes, all enclosed by a double wall, which was filled with rubble. Read More »

Dinas Dinlle Iron Age Hill fort

Dinas Dinlle

This coastal Iron Age hill fort in the community of Llandwrog was built on an isolated hill of glacial drift known as Boncan Dinas, but it has now been considerably eroded by the Irish Sea and the feet of tourists. There is a popular award winning beach on the foreshore, providing views of the Northern coast of the Lleyn Peninsula and Llanddwyn Island, Anglesey. Read More »

Dinas Emrys

Dinas Emrys

The legendary stronghold of Vortigern, and the place where the young prophet Merlin revealed the fighting dragons.  In legend there are two characters associated with the same story with slight variations. One is Vortigern, the Dark Age ruler who let the Saxons into the country, and was responsible in part for their later invasions. Read More »

Druids Temple, Ilton

Druids Temple

The Druids Temple, situated near Ilton, about 4 miles west of Masham is a folly created by William Danby of nearby Swinton Hall in 1820. The structure sits deep within a private forest and includes a large stone table, a sheltered cave and an altar stone. The temple is approximately 100 feet long and 50 feet wide, with some of the stones standing over 10 feet high. Read More »

Dun Borranish

This ruined dun is said to have been the home of a giant called Cuithach, who in the tradition of most giants, laid waste to the surrounding area by stealing cattle and killing local people. Read More »

Dun Carloway Broch (Dun Charlabhaigh)

Dun Carloway Broch

Situated on a rocky outcrop overlooking the sea, the broch is one of the best-preserved in Lewis; one wall still stands 30 feet at its highest point. Read More »

Dunadd

The carved footprint

The ancient king seat of Dunadd - capital of the kingdom of Dalraidia (Dal Riata) - rises out of the barren flatness of Crinan Moss, the raised bog floodplain of the meandering River Add. This rocky outcrop was the power base of the Scotti tribe, who invaded from Ireland around the 5th century AD. Read More »

Dunino Church and Den

The church may occupy a site on which a stone circle once stood, some of the stones can still be seen incorporated into the fabric of the church. In other stories the stones came from a circle on the other side of Dunino Den. It was quite common for churches to be built on much older pagan sites. Read More »

Dyffryn Ardudwy Cromlechs

Dyffryn Ardudwy Cromlechs

Behind the local school at Dyffryn Ardudwy and reached by a sign posted footpath two exposed cromlechs are visible amidst a field of stones. The cromlechs are about twenty feet apart and the stones that surround them mark the remains of the huge cairn that would have covered these graves that date back to the Neolithic period. Read More »

Eamont Bridge and Arthur's Round Table

Arthurs Round Table

Two prehistoric henge monuments have become known as Arthur's Round Table, a common theme in folklore were ancient structures become romanticised into legendary sites.  A cave near Eamont Bridge called giants cave is associated with two legendary giants called Tarquin and Isir. Read More »

Edin's Hall Broch

This is one of the most southerly broch survivals, which are more typically associated with Northern Scotland. Broch’s were multi floored defensive structures with room for cattle in the lower enclosure and accommodation on the upper floors accessed by passageways in the thick walls. Read More »

Eildon Hill

Eildon Hill

Eildon Hill is a triple peak that dominates the landscape around Melrose in Southern Scotland. The hillfort was occupied in pre-historic times, was used as a signal station by the Romans, and was re-occupied during the Romano-British period. It is associated with the legendary wizard Michael Scot, and the ballad of Thomas the Rhymer. Read More »

Elva Hill

Elva Hill

Elva Hill is known as a fairy hill and the name may be derived from an old Viking name meaning place of the elves. A stone circle on its slope suggests ancient ritual use of the area, only 15 stones of the original 30 remain. The circle is on private land belonging to Elva Farm, but there is a nearby footpath. The site is thought to date from Neolithic times. Read More »

Eo Rossa

The Eo Rossa or Eó Ruis (Yew of Ross) was one of the five sacred trees of Ireland (the Bile* Trees or the Bileda) and said to grow by the River Barrow at Leighlinbridge. It grew from three natured berries from a branch born by the Irish God, Trefuilngid Tre-ochair (Triple Bearer of the Triple Key, Master of All Wisdom and consort of Macha, the triple goddess). Read More »

Ffynnon Aelrhiw

Fynnon Aelrhiw can be found in a field below the church. It is a rectangular basin in a larger surround with evidence of flat stone seats. People visited this well because its waters are meant to have a healing effect on skin diseases.

Ffynnon Arian (Silver Well)

Ffynnon Arian in the village of Mynytho on the Llyn peninsula, Gwynedd is an ancient wishing well. It is a natural spring without traces of a structure according to ‘Holy Wells of Wales’.

Ffynnon Barruc (St Barruc's Well)

St Barruc's Well is today capped and the once healing waters were diverted to make way for a Butlins holiday camp in 1965. Luckily though descriptions of the well survive. Wirt Sykes in British Goblins (1881) tells us that ‘on Barry Island, near Cardiff, is the famous well of St. Read More »

Ffynnon Dyfnog, St. Dyfnog’s Well, Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch

Situated in a copse approximately 200 yards West of Eglwys St. Dyfnog, with access via a gate in the graveyard, is Ffynnon Dyfnog, (the well of Saint Dyfnog) which is a rectangular stone bath (18 inches deep) fed by a spring. Read More »

Ffynnon Elian (St. Elian's Well)

St Elian’s Well, like most Holy Well’s was associated with having healing properties until around 1723 when it developed a reputation for being a cursing well. Thought to have sprang forth to quench the thirst of St Elian in the 6th century, the well was a source of pilgrimage for many centuries. Read More »

Ffynnon Enddwyn

Ffynnon Enddwyn is a Holy Well or Sacred Spring in the Merionethshire area of Gwynedd. The information sign at the well states:- Read More »

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Bryncroes

This well can be found on the roadside in the village of Bryncroes. It is on, what was the main pilgrim route to Bardsey Island through the Lleyn Peninsula. Bryncroes was the probably the final stop for pilgrims heading to embark from Aberdaron. Read More »

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Aberdaron

Ffynnon Fair can be found on the shore to the east of the precipitous rocks rising out of the sea known locally as ‘the wall’. This well always gives fresh water even though it is often covered over by the sea. It is said that a wish can be fulfilled by running with a mouthful of the water, three times around the quadrangle of the nearby St. Mary’s church. Read More »



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