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Glastonbury Abbey, Arthur's Grave

Arthur's Cross

This is a reproduction of the cross said to have been found in Arthur's grave at Glastonbury Abbey. The actual grave seems to have been a very early burial but the Arthur link is tenuous. The actual cross disappeared many years ago and the only depiction is from a drawing by William Camden in 1607, from which this picture has been redrawn. Read More »

Glastonbury Holy Thorn Tree

Holy Thorn

I have visited Glastonbury many times over the last few decades, but only got around to visiting the Holy Thron on Wearyall Hill for the first time in September 2011. Unfortunately it was in a poor state after being vandalised the previous December and then apparently further damaged by souvenir hunters. Read More »

Glastonbury Tor

Glastonbury Tor

The Tor has been associated with magic and mystery for thousands of years. It seems likely that early man used the tor for rituals, and maze like path has been identified spiralling around the tor seven times. Professor Philip Rahtz dated the terraces to the Neolithic period, and concluded that they may have been part of a maze. Read More »

Glenashdale falls

glenashdale falls

Glenashdale falls is one of the most impressive waterfalls in the West of Scotland, situated on the Isle of Arran, a short ferry ride from the mainland, the area is full of sites of archaeological interest. Read More »

Gors-Fawr Stone Circle

The circle consists of 16 standing stones with a diameter of 22.3 metres, 72 feet. Towards the Northeast of the circle are two outlying standing stones. It is not clear whether they are related to the circle and may date from an earlier or later timescale.

Directions: Off a minor road from the A478, signposted

Gosforth Chapel

Gosforth Cross

This must have been an important place of worship to the Norse invaders, and to later generations judging by the wealth of important early Christian relics here. The actual church has been renovated several times and much of the older structure has been destroyed. Read More »

Grims Ditches

Grims Ditches are a series of linear earthworks that stretch along part of the Berkshire border, to the Southeast of Wantage and Southwest of Chilton. The purpose of the ditches is not entirely clear but it is likely they had an enclosing function, to define land and protect it. Read More »

Grimspound Bronze Age Settlement

Grimspound is a late Bronze Age settlement enclosed by a huge stone wall. The inhabitants were probably cattle farmers and the hut circles are the remains of their homes and pens for the cattle. It is not clear if the outer wall was for defence purposes or to keep the cattle enclosed. Read More »

Groes Las

The Groes Las settlement between Harlech and Llanfair was a domestic agricultural homestead in prehistory. It consists of the remains of a hut circle with walls approximately 3.0 metres thick and up to 1.2 metres high.

Gwern Einion

Gwern Einion is a representative cromlech, found on Gwern Einion Farm in the district of Llanfair, Meirionnydd. It has been damaged over the centuries, the burial chamber has historically been used as a shed, and the cairn has been robbed of its stone to build dry stone walls. It has actually been incorporated into a dry stone wall of the garden of a now derelict cottage on the farm. Read More »

Hackpen White Horse

The White Horse carved into Hackpen Hill dates from 1838 and was created to commemorate the coronation of Queen Victoria. The horse measures 90ft by 90ft.

Hambledon Hill

Originally the hill served as the site of a Middle Neolithic Causeway Camp, such as the one at Windmill Hill in Avebury. The camp was enclosed by causeway ditches to the Eastern end of the hillside, perhaps protected by wooden palisades, evidence suggests the camp was attacked by archers in an inter tribal skirmish. Read More »

Hangman's Stone, Upper Lambourn

There is a legend associated with the Hangman's Stone found at a junction of tracks 1.5Km north of Upper Lambourn. Possibly a boundary stone or perhaps marking a site of an old gibbet, the story relates to a sheep stealer. One day a man with a stolen sheep over his shoulder rested at the stone and fell asleep. The sheep which had is legs tied began to struggle. Read More »

Harpham

The drumming well located near to the church is reputed to foretell death in the family of St Quentin. The folklore relates to a story about a fourteenth century drummer called Tom Hewson, who was accidentally knocked down the well by a St Quentin squire. Read More »

Hartshead Pike

Hartshead Pike

Hartshead Pike serves as a focal point in the Oldham landscape, visible from miles around with unbroken views across 4 counties. This has been a beacon hill through antiquity. Read More »

Healing Wells at Healing

The village of Healing near Grimsby has two notable healing wells, though they are probably not the source of the villages name. In the Domesday Book, Healing is shown as being Hegelinge, an Anglo Saxon term, possibly similar to Hægelingas meaning ‘the sons or followers Hægel’. Read More »

Here Be Dragons And Ghosts...The Coiled Serpent And Otherworld Hoodies

Drakelow

Drakelow in Worcestershire derives its name from a mythological creature - the dragon. The word for dragon in Germanic mythology and its descendants is worm (Old English: wyrm, Old High German: wurm, Old Norse: ormr), meaning snake or serpent. In Old English wyrm means "serpent", draca means "dragon" (Skeat). Read More »

Heydon Ditch

The Heydon Ditch is a large earthwork that runs from Heydon to Fowlmere and has been dated to Saxon times, although it may have earlier origins. Read More »

The Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara – ancient seat of the Kings of Ireland – is the focal point in a complex landscape of ancient monuments dating from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. It is a stirring setting where mythology and history fuse together, and has been revered as a holy site for thousands of years. Read More »

Holy Island

The island was said to be the home of St Molaise who is reputed to have been born in Ireland in 570AD. He came to Holy Island to live as a hermit and Molaise's cave is one of his reputed abodes. Read More »

Holy Well of St Winifred

St Winifride's Holy Well

The healing waters of St Winifred’s (Winifride) Holy Well have attracted pilgrims for over 1300 years and the crypt in which the well lies was stacked with crutches left by the cured invalids until some time in the 1960’s, though can still be seen on display. Read More »

Hordron Edge Stone Circle

Hordron Edge Stone Circle

The stone circle is associated with fairy lights. One of the stones in the circle is known as the fairy stone and may have been venerated in the past as a fairy abode.

When we arrived at the site, the day after a major festival in the Celtic calender, offerings of fruit and pine cones had been placed on top of each stone. Probably by modern day pagans or witches. Read More »

The Hurlers

The Hurlers Stone Circles

The Hurlers are three stone circles situated on moorland to the Northwest of Minions. The circles are aligned Southwest to Northeast and consist of low granite blocks of varying shapes and sizes. They date back to the Bronze Age period. According to legend they are reputed to be the petrified remains of men who were hurling on the Sabbath. Read More »

Inchmahome Priory

Cloisters at Inchmahome Priory

Situated on an island in the middle of Lake Menteith, the only 'Lake' in Scotland, Inchmahome Priory is a ruined Augustine (The Black Cannons) priory founded in 1238 by Walter Comyn, who was the Earl of Menteith. The Earl is likely to have founded the monastery for the good of his soul, and to show of his status as an important landowner. Read More »

Irton Cross and Church

Irton Cross

There are two Celtic Crosses in Irton Churchyard, one is truly ancient and the other is a copy of the former incorporated into more modern grave. The ancient cross is thought to date from the early ninth century, before the Norsemen invaded the area. Read More »



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