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Kilburn White Horse

The Kilburn White Horse was finished on 4th November 1857 and is believed to be the most northern and possibly the largest White Horse in Britain, being 318’ long and 220’ high (though it was designed to be 314’ long and 228’ high). It faces south-south-west and is situated near Roulston Scar, to the south of Sutton Bank. Read More »

Kilmartin Linear Cemetery

Central stone in the Nether Largie group

The Kilmartin Valley is home to one of the most varied collections of prehistoric sites in the whole of Scotland. Bronze Age cairns, Neolithic chambered tombs, and enigmatic rock carvings, can all be found within a two-mile radius from Kilmartin village. Read More »

Kilmichael Country House Hotel, Brodick

Kilmichael is possibly the oldest house on the Isle of Arran and is associated with the Fullerton family who were one of the two major landowners on the island. The name itself indicates the location of the house may be on the site of an early Christian cell dedicated to St Michael. An apparition of a Grey Lady supposedly haunts the hotel.

King Arthur's Well

King Arthur’s Well is so called, because of the myth connected with it, that the waters derive from King Arthur’s kitchen, and the fat from the meat that was cooked there, floats to the surface at the well. In 1853 a physician from Caernarfon named A. Read More »

King Doniert's Stone

King Doniert's Stone

Two granite slabs carved with latin inscriptions and intricate patterns, lie near the edge of Bodmin Moor.The stones are the remains of crosses, and are associated with King Doniert (Durngarth) of Cornwall who drowned in AD 875 in the river Fowey. Read More »

Kit's Coty House

A Bronze Age cromlech is said to mark the grave of Kit, who was killed in a fifth century battle. The battle is also said to be re-fought by ghostly soldiers.

Kitty's Steps, Lydford Gorge

The pool is haunted by the spirit of a woman who wears a red head-dress. The pool was probably venerated in ancient times.

Knebworth House

Knebworth has a number of legends and ghost stories, it was home to Sir Bulwer Lytton, the Victorian author with an avid interest in the occult. He was certainly involved with many people who were major players in occult thought from that time, including Eliphas Levi, the famous French Magus who visited Knebworth on several occasions. Read More »

Knockinarea

Knockinarea is the name of the prominent mountain on the Cuil Irra peninsula to the west of Sligo, County Sligo. The name of the hill has been interpreted as: The Hill of the King, The Hill of the Moon and The Hill of the Executioner amongst other things, and dominates the views from miles around. Read More »

Knowlton Henges

Knowlton Henges

The area around Knowlton formed a major ritual site in the Neolithic period, the main focus being three Neolithic henge earthworks. Two have long since been ploughed and weathered away, but one remains with the ruin of a twelfth century Norman church at its centre, probably some form of controlling pagan sites by the early church. Read More »

La Hogue Bie

La Hogue Bie

La Hogue Bie is a major Neolitic ritual site dating back to 3500BC and one of the best preserved cruciform passage graves in Europe. Its passage is twenty meters long and is covered by a 12.2 meter high earth mound. The mound istelf is 58 meters in diameter and covers an area of 2400 square meters. Read More »

The Lambton Worm and Penshaw Hill

The Lambton Worm

Around the time of the crusades (in some accounts) in the area around the river Wear, there is a tale told about a fearsome dragon, which terrorised the area and was dispatched with cunning by a brave warrior. Read More »

Lanyon Quoit

Lanyon Quoit

Also known as The Giants Table, Lanyon Quoit is a Neolithic burial mound dating back to 2500BC. The chambered tomb is made up of three upright granite blocks and a capstone, the covering mound has long since weathered away. Read More »

Leper’s Well, Lyme Regis

Leper's Well Plaque

Situated on hill leading down into the town of Lyme Regis, the Leper’s Well stands on the site of the Chapel of St. Mary and the Holy Spirit. There is a worn inscription above the well telling that a hospital stood on the spot 700 years ago, presumably connected with the alleged curative properties of the well. Read More »

Liddington Castle

Liddington Castle is an early Iron Age hill fort covering roughly 7.5 acres and 909 ft above sea level. Though there is no archaeological evidence to support the fact, it has been argued that Liddington Castle could be the probable site for the Battle of Badon (aka Siege of Mount Badon), first mentioned by Gildas in the 6th Century. Read More »

Llangelynin Church and The Holy Well of St. Celynin

Llangelynin church is one of the oldest and remotest churches in Wales; it dates from the 12th Century. Saint Celynin might have erected a religious edifice on the site in the 6th Century since St. Celynin’s well is in the corner of the church yard. The well is a small rectangular pool with stone seats and stone walls. It was reputedly famous for its ability to cure sick children. Read More »

Llddwyn Island

This island is connected by a sandy beach to Anglesey, and was home in the Dark Ages to a religious community, founded by the female Saint Dwynwen. St Dwynwen is a patron saint of Welsh lovers, and after her death the island became an important place of pilgrimage. Read More »

Llech Lafar, St Davids

Llech Lafar, a speaking slab of marble by the River Alun is referred to by Wirt Sykes in his ‘British Goblins’ (1881). 'The Talking Stone Llechlafar, or stone of loquacity, served as a bridge over the river Alyn, bounding the churchyard of St. David s in Pembrokeshire, on the northern side. Read More »

Llety’r Filiast

Llety'r Filiast translates into English as "The Lair of the Greyhound Bitch". It is a ruined Neolithic burial chamber situated on the Great Orme. Most of the stone from the cairn has been taken over the years, but it is thought that when it was originally built it would have measured thirty metres long and ten metres wide, and been vaguely egg shaped. Read More »

Lligwy Burial Chamber

The remains of the Lligwy Cromlech probably date from around 5000 BC (late Neolithic period). Access to the main central chamber would have been through a small narrow passage. The massive capstone (supported by eight smaller pillar stones), measures eighteen feet by fifteen feet, and is estimated to weigh twenty-five tons. Read More »

Llyn Cerrig Bach

This small lake, found just to the north of RAF Valley may have been an important site for ritualistic sacrifices made by the Iron Age inhabitants of Anglesey. While RAF Valley was being constructed during WWII the workmen uncovered in the peat at the former lake edge, the largest hoard (approximately 150 pieces) of Iron Age objects found in Wales. Read More »

Lochmaben Stane (Stone)

The Lochmaben Stane (or Lochmabenstane, Lochmabenstone, Clochmabenstane, Old Graitney Stone, Lowmabanstane, Loughmabanestane) stands in a farmers field near where the Kirtle Water enters the Solway Firth. Made if granite, it measures 7-8 feet in height and has a girth between 18 and 21 feet (depending upon your source). Read More »

Long Meg and Her Daughters

Long Meg Portrait

A weight of awe, not easy to be bourne,
Fell suddenly upon my spirit - cast
From the dread bosom of the unknown past
When first I saw that family forlorn..
Read More »

Lough Derg

Lough Derg is a 2200 acre lake in County Donegal, famous for St Patrick's Purgatory which is still a popular of pilgrimage as it has been many centuries. Read More »

Mab's Cross

The remains of this 13th century (earliest known mention 1277) stone cross can be found on Standishgate and is thought to have been a medieval waymarker between Chorley and Wigan.  It was moved from its original position on the other side of the road in 1922 when the road was widened.  The cross’s name is derived from its legendary association with Lady Mabel Bradshaw.  T Read More »



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