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Men-an Tol

Men-an Tol

Men-an-Tol, consist of a holed stone (with the largest hole of any British holed stone) between two upright stones, with other fallen stones nearby. The holed stone is considered to be the remains of an entrance to a chambered tomb. The whole structure having been covered with a mound of earth. As with many of these cromlechs it is difficult to image a mound covering them at any time. Read More »

Meon Hill, Lower Quinton

An Iron Age hill fort once stood upon Meon Hill and it has been suggested that man has lived there from the Stone Age, but it a legend concerning the formation of the hill that has attracted my attention. Read More »

Mitchell's Fold

Mitchells Fold

Fourteen stones remain of this circle which probably numbered about thirty when it was built around 2000-1400BC. It sits on the ridge of Stapeley Hill, in view of the Stiperstones and the Welsh border. The circle is 27 metres in diameter and is 330 metres above sea level. Read More »

Moel Faner Hillfort

With an entrance facing towards the north-east, this oval shaped hillfort is probably from the Iron Age. It lies at a height of 950 feet, on a promontory of a hill overlooking the Nannau estate and the Mawddach valley. The fort was small, being about 0.5 acres and the single wall enclosing the fort would have been about six feet high, but it is now quite trampled. Read More »

Moel Goedog Hillfort

In a commanding position situated on the hills above Harlech are the remains of the suspected late Bronze Age hillfort known as Moel Goedog. It is adjacent to the prehistoric track way of Fonlief Hir, which is indicated by a series of standing stones along the route. Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 1

Moel Goedog 1 lies just of the track, close to Moel Goedog hillfort and the two Moel Goedog ring cairns, East and Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 2

This standing stone is just beside the track, being about 60 metres from Moel Goedog 3 and near to the Moel Goedog hillfort. Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 3

This standing stone is close to Moel Goedog hillfort, and it is about 60 metres from Moel Goedog 2. Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 6 a.k.a. Fonlief Hir Stone E

Moel Goedog 6 is a wedged shaped standing stone that has a notch in its upper surface. It stands 0.8 metres high and is part of the Fonlief Hir ancient Track way.

Moel Goedog, East (Ring Cairn)

This is the remains of the easterly ring cairn (a Neolithic burial covered with stones); one of a pair situated close together in the Moel Goedog ancient monument complex situated the hills above Harlech close to Moel Goedog hillfort.

Moel Goedog, West (Ring Cairn)

This is the remains of the westerly ring cairn (a Neolithic burial covered with stones); one of a pair situated close together in the Moel Goedog ancient monument complex situated the hills above Harlech close to Moel Goedog hillfort.

Moel Offrwm (Lower Hillfort)

Being only 0.5 acres in area, and built on a small prominent rock, this fort did not have much room for a settlement, but due to its natural defences and its high wall, it would have been easy to defend. Evidence has been found for a single six metre diameter roundhouse within the fort, so it would only have housed a handful of people. Read More »

Moel Offrwm (Upper Hillfort)

Within the Nannau estate near Llanfachreth, there are three hillforts in quite close proximity, Moel Offrwm (Upper fort), Moel Offrwm (Lower fort) and Moel Faner. Read More »

Moel-y-Sensigl [a.k.a. Moel Goedog Stone 7 & Fonlief Hir Stone A]

This standing stone found close to Merthyr Farm, Harlech, is the tallest and most prominent of the five stones denoting the supposed prehistoric track way known as Fonlief Hir. The stone stands just over six feet tall and can be seen over a gate in the stone farm wall beside the road.

The Longstone at Mottistone

Longstone at Mottistone

This impressive standing stone and its smaller recumbent companion, are believed to be all that is left of a chambered long barrow from the Neolithic period, the remaining stones once being part of the tomb entrance.   Read More »

Mullinakill Holy Well

Mullenakill is just one of several places that claim to be the birth place of St Moling. Read More »

Nether Stowey

Nether Stowey has a number of holy wells, and the crossroads at Over Stowey is traditionally haunted by a creature known as the Galley Beggar, who laughs demonically at passers by. A Galley Begger is the local name for a frightening spirit.

New Books Published on Fairies and Boggles in Cumbria

A SERIES of hand-crafted booklets on the folklore and legends of Cumbria has been published. Read More »

Newgrange

Newgrange Entrance

If we were making a list of the top 100 ancient sites in Britain and Ireland (as is the current vogue) Newgrange would undoubtedly be in the hallowed top 10. Its great age, size, astronomical features and location in the beautiful Boyne Valley, mark it as one of the most important ‘mystery' sites in Europe. Read More »

Nine Maidens Well, Strathmartine

As with the dragon that was associated with it, very little remains of the Nine Maidens Well at Strathmartine, as the farmer upon whose land it could be found had the well covered up to stop it’s visitors from trampling his crops. Read More »

Nine Stones Circle

Nine Stones Circle

This small stone circle is set enchantingly by the busy A35, although it is still worth a visit on the round trip from Maiden Castle, which is to the West along the same road.

Directions:
Off the A35 to the West of Winterbourne Abbas.

  Read More »

Oldbury Castle and Cherhill White Horse

Cherhill White Horse

This hillfort that covers 9 hectares or 22 acres was occupied in Roman times, and it is said to be haunted by ghostly Roman soldiers. They have been seen on a road near to the camp. The camp itself sits upon a bronze age settlement and evidence of post Roman occupation has also been found. Read More »

Paranormal Phenomena of West Kennet Long Barrow

Peter Knight (dowser, shamanic drummer, and International speaker) has just published the most comprehensive book ever on West Kennet Long Barrow, the finest Neolithic long barrow in Britain. He deals with such elements as the excavations, shamanic uses, astronomy, its place in the landscape, acoustics, earth energies and dowsing, symbolism and more. Read More »

Pen Dinas Hill Fort, Great Orme

There was once an Iron Age hill fort at this area called Pen Dinas on the Great Orme. Archaeologists have identified the remains of more than fifty hut circles and some degraded defensive ramparts. Pen Dinas is subsidiary peak that juts out of the Great Orme, and it is a good defensive location for a settlement. Read More »

Pen Llystyn Roman Fort

There used to be a Roman military settlement just north of where the old Roman road changes direction at Bryncir, (the now A487 was once the Roman military road between the forts at Caernarfon (Segontium) and Trawsfynyedd (Heriri Mons, a.k.a. Read More »



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