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Lough Derg

Lough Derg is a 2200 acre lake in County Donegal, famous for St Patrick's Purgatory which is still a popular of pilgrimage as it has been many centuries. Read More »

Mab's Cross

The remains of this 13th century (earliest known mention 1277) stone cross can be found on Standishgate and is thought to have been a medieval waymarker between Chorley and Wigan.  It was moved from its original position on the other side of the road in 1922 when the road was widened.  The cross’s name is derived from its legendary association with Lady Mabel Bradshaw.  T Read More »

Machrie Moor Stone Circles

Three of the tall sandstone pillars

The Isle of Arran, off the West Coast of Scotland, has many stone circles and standing stones dating from the Neolithic period and the early Bronze Age. The finest collection of circles can be found on Machrie Moor, on the West of the island. The whole moorland is littered with the remains of early man, from hut circles to chambered cairns and solitary standing stones. Read More »

Madron Holy Well

One of the most widely known wells in Cornwall, Madron Holy Well is still used, and has been the scene of some miraculous cures in the past. About 100 metres away are the remains of the Madron Well Chapel.

Rags and other objects are left to rot away in the hope of cures, and as votive offerings.

Directions: Northwest of Madron from a footpath Read More »

Maiden Castle

Maiden Castle

This is the largest Iron Age Hillfort in Britain, consisting of a spectacular series of bank and ditch defences enclosing an area of 45 acres. These fortifications cover the much earlier site of a Middle Neolithic Causeway Camp from around 3000BC. The camp was enclosed by two lines of ditches, the remains of which are indistinguishable. Read More »

Maiden Well, North Kelsey

Maiden Well Lane in North Kelsey was probably named after the Maiden Well which was visited on St Mark’s Eve (April 24th) by unmarried women in order to discover, through divination who they will marry. Read More »

Mam Tor

Mam Tor is an Iron Age hill fort standing at over 520 metres above sea level. The fort has defences which cover an area of 1100 metres, consisting of a single rubble bank which is re-enforced in places with dry stone walling. The bank has a ditch on the outside and would probably have been protected by a wooded palisade when occupied. Read More »

Mayburgh Henge (aka Mayborough Henge)

In 'Rude Stone Monuments In All Countries, Their Age And Uses' (1872) (which was later retitled 'Old Stone Monuments'), James Fergusson(1808-1886) gives the following description of Mayborough Henge. Read More »

Medieval Heretics and the Green Man

There is a general acceptance that the Green Man is a representation of a pagan deity, but this is not borne out by the abundance of Green Man carvings to be found on or within Christian churches. Could this contradiction be the clue that will lead to our understanding of this archaic figure? Why do we find the Green Many associated with churches? Read More »

Meini Hirion (Llanbedr Standing Stones)

Llanbedr Stones

The Meini Hirion or ‘long stones’ are a pair of standing stones situated in Llanbedr. They are in a livestock field on the left hand side of the village as you travel north towards Pen-sarn. The field regularly floods when there is a high tide, and the stones are partially obscured by a large tree which grows close by them. Read More »

Men-an Tol

Men-an Tol

Men-an-Tol, consist of a holed stone (with the largest hole of any British holed stone) between two upright stones, with other fallen stones nearby. The holed stone is considered to be the remains of an entrance to a chambered tomb. The whole structure having been covered with a mound of earth. As with many of these cromlechs it is difficult to image a mound covering them at any time. Read More »

Meon Hill, Lower Quinton

An Iron Age hill fort once stood upon Meon Hill and it has been suggested that man has lived there from the Stone Age, but it a legend concerning the formation of the hill that has attracted my attention. Read More »

Mitchell's Fold

Mitchells Fold

Fourteen stones remain of this circle which probably numbered about thirty when it was built around 2000-1400BC. It sits on the ridge of Stapeley Hill, in view of the Stiperstones and the Welsh border. The circle is 27 metres in diameter and is 330 metres above sea level. Read More »

Moel Faner Hillfort

With an entrance facing towards the north-east, this oval shaped hillfort is probably from the Iron Age. It lies at a height of 950 feet, on a promontory of a hill overlooking the Nannau estate and the Mawddach valley. The fort was small, being about 0.5 acres and the single wall enclosing the fort would have been about six feet high, but it is now quite trampled. Read More »

Moel Goedog Hillfort

In a commanding position situated on the hills above Harlech are the remains of the suspected late Bronze Age hillfort known as Moel Goedog. It is adjacent to the prehistoric track way of Fonlief Hir, which is indicated by a series of standing stones along the route. Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 1

Moel Goedog 1 lies just of the track, close to Moel Goedog hillfort and the two Moel Goedog ring cairns, East and Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 2

This standing stone is just beside the track, being about 60 metres from Moel Goedog 3 and near to the Moel Goedog hillfort. Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 3

This standing stone is close to Moel Goedog hillfort, and it is about 60 metres from Moel Goedog 2. Read More »

Moel Goedog Stone 6 a.k.a. Fonlief Hir Stone E

Moel Goedog 6 is a wedged shaped standing stone that has a notch in its upper surface. It stands 0.8 metres high and is part of the Fonlief Hir ancient Track way.

Moel Goedog, East (Ring Cairn)

This is the remains of the easterly ring cairn (a Neolithic burial covered with stones); one of a pair situated close together in the Moel Goedog ancient monument complex situated the hills above Harlech close to Moel Goedog hillfort.

Moel Goedog, West (Ring Cairn)

This is the remains of the westerly ring cairn (a Neolithic burial covered with stones); one of a pair situated close together in the Moel Goedog ancient monument complex situated the hills above Harlech close to Moel Goedog hillfort.

Moel Offrwm (Lower Hillfort)

Being only 0.5 acres in area, and built on a small prominent rock, this fort did not have much room for a settlement, but due to its natural defences and its high wall, it would have been easy to defend. Evidence has been found for a single six metre diameter roundhouse within the fort, so it would only have housed a handful of people. Read More »

Moel Offrwm (Upper Hillfort)

Within the Nannau estate near Llanfachreth, there are three hillforts in quite close proximity, Moel Offrwm (Upper fort), Moel Offrwm (Lower fort) and Moel Faner. Read More »

Moel-y-Sensigl [a.k.a. Moel Goedog Stone 7 & Fonlief Hir Stone A]

This standing stone found close to Merthyr Farm, Harlech, is the tallest and most prominent of the five stones denoting the supposed prehistoric track way known as Fonlief Hir. The stone stands just over six feet tall and can be seen over a gate in the stone farm wall beside the road.

The Longstone at Mottistone

Longstone at Mottistone

This impressive standing stone and its smaller recumbent companion, are believed to be all that is left of a chambered long barrow from the Neolithic period, the remaining stones once being part of the tomb entrance.   Read More »



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