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Crossroad Blues

Gallows

“I went down to the Crossroads, fell down on my knees” Robert Johnson.
When Robert Johnson sang of the Crossroads down in the 1930’s Mississippi Delta, he was paying homage to a tradition that has existed in varied forms for centuries, and at the same time adding his own contribution to the wealth of folklore that exists around the crossing place of two highways. Read More »

Aleister Crowley

Aleister Crowley on elbows

Probably the most notorious magician of his period, if not of all time, Aleister Crowley has had far more influence after his death than at any time during his over-indulged life. His reputation as a drug fiend and evil man aside, his early writings show a keen intellect, and a good sense of humour in the more staid climate of his era. What follows is a brief summary of his life. Read More »

Deadmans Hill, Clophill

St Mary's Church

The ruined church of St Mary's and the churchyard was the scene of a particularly grisly black magic ritual during the 1960's. The sixties were a time of occult revival in many parts of the country and some groups seem to have been interested in the more diabolical side of magic. Read More »

John Dee

John Dee

John Dee was an eminent Elizabethan mathematician and astrologer. His studies into the Occult took him abroad on many occasions, and this has added weight to the suspicion that he was also a secret government agent (code name 007). Read More »

Devil Conjuration In Merthyr Tydfil

Before Picton Street in Merthyr Tydfil was replaced by Caedraw Road, you could find the Black Lion Inn (58 Picton Street), and according to the following story which appeared in British Goblins (1881) by Wirt Sykes, two of its drunken customers attempted to summon the Devil which appeared to them in the shape of a gosling. 'These men were one night drinking together at the Black Lion Inn, when Read More »

Devil Summoning Tailor of Glanbran

The 18th century Glanbran House was dismantled around 1930 and was the ancestral home of the Gwynne family, the descendants of David Goch Gwyn who settled at Glanbran in the 16th century. Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins: Welsh Folk-Lore, Fairy Mythology, Legends and Traditions (1881) gives the following story in which an unnamed member of the Gwynne family plays a prominent part. Read More »

Druids Temple, Ilton

Druids Temple

The Druids Temple, situated near Ilton, about 4 miles west of Masham is a folly created by William Danby of nearby Swinton Hall in 1820. The structure sits deep within a private forest and includes a large stone table, a sheltered cave and an altar stone. The temple is approximately 100 feet long and 50 feet wide, with some of the stones standing over 10 feet high. Read More »

Eleanor Cobham, Duchess of Gloucester

Penance of Eleanor Cobham

Immortalised by Shakespeare, Eleanor Cobham, Duchess of Gloucester was accused of trying to assassinate King Henry VI using witchcraft; a crime for which she received life imprisonment and perhaps left a ghostly legacy. Read More »

Farmers Sacrifice Seven Year Old Girl For Good Crop (2011)

The following article entitled 'Farmers sacrifice 7-yr-old girl for good crop, held' appeared in the Times of India on 3 January 2012.  It concerns the alleged human sacrifice of a young child as an offering to ensure a successful harvest. Read More »

Dr Simon Forman

Dr Simon Forman

Dr Simon Forman was an Elizabethan occultist, and alternative medical practitioner in London. He was a quack physician and surgeon, who spent time in jail for occult practices and prescribing dangerous potions, was banned from practicing medicine, and implicated in murder after his death. Read More »

Forres

King Duff (930AD-966AD) was son of King Malcolm I and succeeded King Indulf to the throne of Alba (Scotland) in 962AD. Culen, son of Indulf attempted to take the throne in battle but failed. However King Duff fell ill shortly afterwards and in his weakened state could not govern the country properly and rebellions began to break out. Read More »

Haunted Lambeth by James Clark

Haunted Lambeth by James Clark

Written by fellow ASSAP (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) member, James Clark, Haunted Lambeth features a collection of paranormal tales including poltergeists, apparitions, black dogs and other unexplained phenomena. Read More »

The Hellfire Club

Medmenham Abbey

"Hellfire Club" is a name that brings in mind a coven of hooded and caped Enlightment-era gentlemen practising all kinds of debauchery, Satan worship being the most prominent. Read More »

Hill of Fare

The Hill of Fare was the scene of a battle in 1562 between George, the 4th Earl of Huntly and Mary Queen of Scots, his first cousin. Huntly's wife had been in consultation with the witches of Strathbogie who told her that Huntly would be lying in the Tollbooth at Aberdeen without a wound on his body by nightfall. Read More »

Hoo St Werburgh Witch Buried

On 14 March 2009 a funeral service and burial was held at Hoo St Werburgh parish church for the remains of a suspected witch, buried seven centuries ago and discovered in an archaeological dig in 2007. On 3rd March 2009, The Daily Mail printed the following article entitled ‘Teenage 'witch' decapitated 700 years ago to be given Christian funeral service.' Read More »

In the Shadow of the Highgate Vampire by David Farrant

In The Shadow of the Highgate Vampire

I have known the name David Farrant ever since I first started reading about and investigating the paranormal. Read More »

Isabel Gowdie, Witch of Auldearn

Isabel (Isobel) Gowdie was a young housewife from Auldearn in Nairnshire who is remembered not just for being tried as a witch, but for her detailed confession. Her trial was in 1662 and what makes her confession so interesting, apart from the detail, is that is that it was supposedly taken without the use of torture. Read More »

Jersey Devil –The Origins

Jersey Devil

Over the last 250 years there have been several sightings of a creature that has become known as the Jersey Devil (or Leeds Devil). Described as being bipedal with hooves and wings, the Jersey Devil would apparently dry up the milk within cows by breathing upon them. Read More »

John Jenkin Devil Summoner

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) gives the following account of a devil summoning ceremony performed by a schoolmaster and renowned conjurer named John Jenkin in Pembrokeshire. Read More »

Knaresborough

Knaresborough is most famous for its connections with the prophetess Mother Shipton. She is said to have been born in a cave now known as Mother Shipton's cave, now a popular tourist attraction. Read More »

Knebworth House

Knebworth has a number of legends and ghost stories, it was home to Sir Bulwer Lytton, the Victorian author with an avid interest in the occult. He was certainly involved with many people who were major players in occult thought from that time, including Eliphas Levi, the famous French Magus who visited Knebworth on several occasions. Read More »

Lady Eleanor Primrose And The Conjurer Of Canongate

According to John Ingram, Sir Walter Scott's (Born 15 August 1771 – Died 21 September 1832) story 'My Aunt Margaret's Mirror' was based upon events surrounding Eleanor Countess of Stair. In his book 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain' (1897), Ingram gives the following full account which he compiled using the work of Robert Chambers and other Scottish writers. Read More »

Lemegeton or Lesser Key of Solomon

This work dating from the seventeenth century is in four parts and is supposed to be a list of the names, orders and offices of all the spirits King Solomon had contact with. Read More »

Eliphas Levi

Eliphas Levi

Alphonse Louis Constant (more commonly known by his pseudonym: Eliphas Levi), was an occultist and author who is considered to have greatly influenced the 19th century's occult revival.

Levi was born on in Paris, France 8th February 1810 at a time when Napoleon was conquering continental Europe, and France was at war - following the bloodthirsty Revolution. Read More »

Llyn Cowlyd

On the edge of the Carneddau range of mountains in Snowdonia lays the deepest lake in North Wales, Llyn Cowlyd. The lake has been dammed so it is unnaturally deep, but it has given soundings of 229 feet, and has a mean depth of 109 feet. The lake is almost 2 miles long, and a third of a mile wide, with the adjacent hills dropping steeply to the lakes edges. Read More »

Craig-y-Nos Castle


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