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Feather Death Related Folklore

According to The Ghost World by T. F. Thiselton Dyer (1893) ‘The presence of pigeon or game feathers is said to be another hindrance to the exit of the soul; and, occasionally, in order to facilitate its departure, the peasantry in many parts of England will lay a dying man on the floor.

Bignor Hill

According to Sylvanus Urban’s ‘Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Chronicle (1816)‘The old inhabitants of the place have a tradition now nearly lost that a large Dragon had its den on Bignor Hill and that marks of its folds were to be seen on the hill a relick of remote antiquity and of Celtic origin.’

A23 Pyecombe

According to the BBC News Website ‘The UK’s most haunted road is listed as the A23 between London and Brighton, where ghostly figures include a small girl with no hands or feet, a figure in a white trench coat and a figure in cricketer’s clothing.’

At Pyecombe apparently a strange figure has been seen scampering across the road.

Goring-by-Sea Dancing Ghost

The following article entitled ‘Ghostly Goring scared out of its wits’ was published in the Worthing Herald, on Tuesday 30 October 2007. It concerns a spree of ghost sightings in Goring-by-Sea at the end of the 1920’s. The article mentions that sightings took place around Goring Hall.

Devil’s Dyke

The Devil’s Dyke is a V shaped valley roughly 100 feet deep that was created by erosion caused by an ancient river, however local legends would have us belief that it was created by the Devil himself, hence its name.

Cuckfield Park

Cuckfield Park is a private Elizabethan house that was the seat of the Bowyer and then the Sergison family. It was the inspiration behind William Harrison Ainsworth’s (born 1805- died 1882) famous romance novel Rookwood and was said to be reputedly haunted by the ghost of Wicked Dame Sergison.

The Royal Oak, East Lavant

The 18th century Royal Oak public house and restaurant in East Lavant had a reputation of being haunted in the 1950’s. It has been suggested that the apparition of a bearded man has been seen in the back rooms and heard climbing the stairs during the evening.

The Kings Head Hotel, Cuckfield

The Kings Head Hotel is no longer open for business and the building has been changed into a residential mews (Kings Mews). However, this hotel which dated from at least 1832 (when Pigot’s Directory of Sussex showed James Webber as the landlord) had a reputation of being haunted by a ghost known locally as Geranium Jane.

Jack Upperton’s Gibbet

This is a fasinating chapter in the past history of an English Highwayman by the name of JACK UPPERTON, who made his final stand against a mail delivery coach with his accomplice (believed to be his brother by some) and robbed the coach of its contents.

Wassailing The Apple Trees – Henfield

Wassailing the Apple Trees or Apple Howling as it is known in Sussex is a festival to bless the apple trees to ensure a good crop in the coming year.  The event takes place on Twelfth Night after dark.  A horn is blown and Morris Men form a torch lit procession to the oldest and strongest apple tree where they form a ring.