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Bodmin

Bodmin means the house of the monks, and this was an ecclesiastical town until the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII.

The original monastery dedicated to St Petroc was founded in the 6th Century. St Petroc's bones are believed to be kept in an ivory casket in the crypt of St Petroc's Church. Read More »

Boggart Hole Clough

The clough was in former times, said to be haunted by a boggart, and there are a number of stories attached to it. Some of these tales probably became attached to the area after they had been written about other similar boggart infested places. Read More »

Boldon Lane, South Shields

The following article by Mike Hallowell entitled Strange goings-on in ‘Spooky Valley’ was published in the Shields Gazette on 21 February 2013. Read More »

Bolling Hall Museum

Now a museum, Bolling Hall, parts of which which date from the 14th century, is one of Bradford’s oldest buildings. It would also appear to have a reputation for being haunted and has a famous legend relating to a white lady in what is known as the Ghost Room. Read More »

Bolster and St Agnes

Bolster's Stride

In the time of giants in the Penwith area of Cornwall, there lived a particularly troublesome giant called Bolster, who was of such enormous stature that he could stand with one foot on Carn Brae, and the other on the beacon near St Agnes, a distance of 6 miles. Read More »

Bomere Pool

The privately owned Bomere Pool was created through glacial action and is an example of a kettle hole mere. However, there is a story that would have you believe it was created another way. Edwin Sidney Hartland gives the following account of this tradition in his ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ [1890]. Read More »

Borley Rectory

The haunting of the Borley Rectory during the 1920s and 1930s, is undoubtedly one of the most famous in Britain, as well as being one of the most controversial. There seems to be a consensus among many people that the rectory was never really haunted at all, all phenomena being put down to fraud, misinterpreted natural phenomena, and the will of Harry Price to create an interesting case. Read More »

Boston House

Boston House

There are many locations that have and unjust reputation of being haunted and I feel this may be the case with the Boston House in Chiswick. The earliest account I have found of the haunting comes from Christina Hole’s Haunted England: A Survey of English Ghost Lore 1941. Read More »

Botcherby Big Cat (2013)

On 20 May 2013 the following article by Emily Parsons entitled 'A BIG cat spotter claims a recent “lynx” sighting in Carlisle is not the first', was published in the News and Star. Read More »

Bottlebush Down

A horseman garbed in Bronze Age attire has been seen on Bottlebush Down. He disappears into a long barrow from the site of a cursus on the B3081. Many witnesses including respected Archaeologists have seen the spirit. Bottlebush Down seems to have been important to early man and is littered with his remains.

Bournebrook UFO (1901)

In 1901a report was made of a 'hut' landing in a field near Bournebrook in the West Midlands. The 'hut' - as it is described - was occupied by small men wearing tin helmets. This 'hut' then took off into the sky.

Bovington Tank Museum

Tiger Tank, Bovington Museum

The tank museum is home to a German Tiger Tank that saw service during World War II. A figure in WWII era German military uniform was once seen looking at the tank through the museum windows. It has been speculated that the figure is the ghost of a one time occupant of the tank. This is maybe the last remaining operational Tiger Tank. Read More »

Bowood House

Bowood House

In December 1772 the theologian and scientist Dr Joseph Priestley (born 1733 – died 1804) was appointed by Sir William Fitzmaurice/Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne (and from 1784 1st Marquis of Lansdowne) (born 1737 – died 1805) as his librarian, literary companion and tutor to his two sons. Read More »

Bowscale Tarn

Bowscale Tarn is 56 feet deep and during the Victorian era was popular with tourists. According to folklore two immortal fish live in this corrie tarn and depending upon which version of the story you read, they may, or may not have the ability to talk. Read More »

Braddock Down

On 19th January 1643 Sir Ralph Hopton's Royalist forces camped at Boconnoc were surprised to discover a Parliamentarian army under the command of Lord Ruthin deployed on Braddock Down. Ruthin ordered an attack rather than waiting for the reinforcements under the Earl of Stamford to arrive from Liskeard. Hopton's forces won the battle securing Cornwall for the Royalists. Read More »

Bramber Castle

The ruin of Bramber Castle is reportedly haunted by ghostly children that have been witnessed there. They are supposed to be the children of William De Braose, 7th Baron Abergavenny, 4th Lord of Bramber, who displeased King John I and as a result had his children captured and starved to death Read More »

Branwen The Daughter Of Llyr

Branwen The Daughter Of Llyr is part of The Mabinogion. The following is taken from Lady Charlotte Guest's translation which was published in 1877. Read More »

Brent Knoll

The hill, which was once and Iron Age hillfort, is associated with an Arthurian Legend, and was the abode of three fearsome giants. Read More »

Brent Pelham and Piers Shonks

‘A mighty dragon made its lair under the roots of an ancient yew tree and wrought havoc in the surrounding countryside. Piers Shonks, Lord of the Manor of Pelham, fought it accompanied by three huge hounds. He finally triumphed by thrusting a long spear down the dragon’s throat. Read More »

Brewer Street, Soho

It has been suggested that the apparition of Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, (Born 29 September 1758 – Died 21 October 1805) has been seen looking through the window of the building at the location where the upholsterer Mr Peddieson had his shop in the late 18th and early 19th century. Read More »

The Bridestones

This Long Barrow standing on Congleton Edge, is thought to date from around 3000BC during the Mid Neolithic period. The barrow is aligned East to West and contains a chamber in the Eastern end. Excavated during the 18th century much of the covering mound was destroyed along with 2 other chambers. Read More »

Brigham Church

Brigham Church is reputed to be haunted by a hangman named Joseph Wilson, who was interred in the churchyard in the year 1757. He committed suicide by throwing himself from the Cocker Bridge in Cocker Mouth. Read More »

Brimham Rocks

The rocks are associated with a wealth of folklore, and were perhaps a place of ancient worship. They were once thought to have been carved by the druids, although their strange weathering is entirely natural. One stone is called the wishing stone, it has a hole into which you would place the fingers of your right hand and then make a wish. Read More »

Bristol Cathedral

Bristol Cathedral

The origins of Bristol Cathedral date back to 1140, when Robert Fitzharding(e) founded St Augustine’s Abbey on the Deanery Road site and it is a phantom monk that is said to remain and haunt the building. This abbey was designed in the Norman style though very little of this remains today, though the gatehouse and chapterhouse are 12th century. Read More »

Bristol Old Vic

Bristol Old Vic

Work commenced on the construction of The Theatre Royal, Bristol (home of ‘The Bristol Old Vic’ theatre company) in 1764 and the first performance was held there on 30th May 1766.  According to a 2002 Bristol Evening News article; ‘the old Bristol theatre is reportedly haunted by the ghost of actress Sarah Siddons and her repeat performances at the theatre are the stuff Read More »



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