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The Well of Heads (Tobar nan Ceann)

Well of Heads

The monument which stands by the roadside above this ancient well was erected in 1812, its gory carving of a hand holding a dagger and seven severed heads commemorating an incident that took place in 1665. Read More »

The Well Of The Holy Rood, Stenton

The 16th century Well of the Holy Rood at Stenton has a legend attached to its finial which resembles a rosetted cardinal's hat. The legend states that the tenure of Beil depends upon the well keeping its hat. Read More »

The Witch Of Laggan

A hero celebrated for his hatred of witchcraft, was warming himself in his hunting hut, in the forest of Gaick, in Badenoch. His faithful hounds, fatigued with the morning chase, lay stretched on the turf by his side,--his gun, that would not miss, reclined in the neuk of the bothy,--the skian dhu of the sharp edge hung by his side, and these alone constituted his company. Read More »

The Witches Of Delnabo

IN the time of my grandmother, the farm of Delnabo was proportionally divided between three tenants. Read More »

Thom And Willie

THOM and Willie, two young fisher-mates of Lunna, in Shetland, were rivals for the hand of the fair Osla, daughter of Jarm. Now it so happened that, one October afternoon, they took their hand-lines and went out fishing together in their boat. Read More »

Tomnahurich Hill

Tomnahurich Hill

Tomnahurich Hill - which means hill of the yews - is a rounded tree covered hillock on the outskirts of Inverness, the hill has a wealth of traditions associated with it, and it is famed as an abode of the fairies. A modern cemetery now covers the hill. Read More »

Top 10 Haunted Castles UK and Ireland

There are hundreds of stunning castles all over the UK and Ireland – many of which are haunted by numerous ghosts and spirits. Take a ride with us as we explore ten of the UK and Ireland’s most haunted castles.

Wardour Castle, Wiltshire Read More »

Touching the Elements

In the following tale which appeared in 'Some Folk-Tales and Legends of Shetland (1920)' by John Nicolson, the 'elements' referred to are the bread and wine of the Eucharist and I suppose it is supposed to show the reputed strength of Christianity over pagan fairy magic. Read More »

Trinity Poltergeist

Trinity is a mansion house district in Edinburgh that developed in the early 1800’s and was named after Trinity House in Leith. There was a suspected case of poltergeist activity in a house in Trinity around 1835 which led to a legal battle between the supposedly haunted Captain Molesworth and his neighbour and landlord, Mr Webster. Read More »

Trotternish, Isle of Skye

The Trotternish area of Skye was once the haunt of Colann gun Chean (The headless body) who would kill those unfortunate enough to cross his path by flinging his head at them. The ghoul was banished to Arisaig where he caused mayhem until a young man managed to capture the ghosts head – only promising to return it if he returned to Skye. Read More »

Trow

A Trow is a fairy creature from the folklore of Shetland and Orkney, similar to the mainlands elf, troll or goblin. It is said these musical and mischevious folk could be found living under the earth in mounds as well as in the sea surrounding the Shetland and Orkney. Read More »

Tulloch Castle Hotel

This 12th century castle hotel is said to be haunted by an aparition of a Green Lady. Tulloch Castle also has an actual tunnel that runs from it's basement to Dingwall Castle on the other side of town. Parts of the tunnel have collapsed and it is no longer in use.

Uist Spectre Ship

Raymond Lamont Brown gives the following account of a ghost ship in his 'Phantoms Legends, Customs and Superstitions Of The Sea (1972)'. 'Spectre ships have been long seen on the coast of Uist (Outer Hebrides, Inverness, Scotland)', and one particular story was often related by Shony Campbell (Seonaidh Caimbeul)* the famous storyteller and Gaelic poet. Read More »

Unknown Mansion and Queensberry House, Canongate

In 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain' (1897), John Ingram gives the following account of a haunting associated with Canongate in Edinburgh. Named after the Augustine canons of Holyrood Abbey, Canongate can be found at the lower eastern part of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh and the mansion referred to is according Ingram no longer standing. Read More »

Up-Helly-Aa

Up-Helly-Aa is a Norse festival on Shetland during which a replica Viking longship is burned.  It is to celebrate the 24th day after Christmas, or Up Helly Night. The festival is relatively new in Lerwick (early 19th Century) and has evolved over time. In 1840 a tar barrel raft was burned as part of the proceedings.  By the 1870's the long ship and Norse costumes were introduced.

Vayne Castle

The ruin of the Z-plan Vayne Castle dates from the 16th century was built by the Lindsays. There is a Devil legend associated with the castle according to 'The History and Traditions of the Land of the Lindsays' (1882), which states that: Read More »

Wemyss Castle

The castle, built by the Wemyss family, is said to be haunted by the ghost of a Green Lady, whose identity is unknown. Read More »

Werewolves of Loch Langavat

According to folklore, a family of werewolves used to live on an island on Loch Langavat. The story suggests that the now dead werewolves would return should their graves be found and disturbed.

Western Infirmary, Glasgow

The Western Infirmary is a teaching hospital in Glasgow. Mark Gould gives the following account there of a haunt like experience in his article entitled 'Ghosts of sisters past' which was published in The Guardian on 22 December 2004. Read More »

Whuppity Stourie

March 1 - Is Whuppity Stourie Day in Lanark, where primary children run around the church clockwise three times twirling paper balls. The original festival involved young men from neighbouring parishes and was much more violent.

Will o' the Wisp

Will o' the Wisp

The Will o' the Wisp is the most common name given to the mysterious lights that were said to lead travellers from the well-trodden paths into treacherous marshes. The tradition exists with slight variation throughout Britain, the lights often bearing a regional name. Read More »

Woodhouselee

On 23d January 1570, the Regent of Scotland, James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray (born 1531) was assassinated in Linlithgow by a sniper firing a 3’5” long, hexagonal bore barreled carbine from a house window. The assassin was James Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh the nephew of Archbishop John Hamilton, from who’s window he fired the fatal shot. Read More »

Wrichtishousis, Edinburgh

Gillespie's Hospital

In 1798 the Wrichtishousis (Wrychtishousis or Wrightshouses) mansion was bought and subsequently demolished in 1800 to make way for a hospital and school, the legacy of the merchant James Gillespie (born 1726 – died 1797). Read More »

Yarrow

There is a story about a witch from Yarrow. Each night a young boy was transformed into a horse when a local witch slipped a magical bridle over his head whilst he slept. She would ride the boy to her sabbat. One night the boy's older brother tricked the witch and managed to bridle her instead. Read More »



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