You are hereHauntings

Hauntings


Carleton Castle

This ruined castle is said to be the haunt of Sir John Cathcart, identified as a Scottish Bluebeard. Read More »

Carlisle Castle

Carlisle Castle

This building is reputed to be haunted by a ghostly woman. A soldier in 1823 was so frightened when he encountered her, that he bayoneted the apparition, impaling the wall behind it. The soldier fainted and died of shock the following day. Read More »

Carlisle Railway Station

Recent articles in the Cumberland News and Carlisle Living Magazine mention the re-opening of the Undercroft below Carlisle Railway Station for special tours this Halloween (2010) and mention the haunting like experiences that have reported both above and below ground at the station. Read More »

Carlisle's Haunting Past

As it will be Halloween soon I thought I would take a look at the haunting history of my home city of Carlisle and the surrounding areas. I decided to go on the late night tour of Carlisle city and train station. The tour (known more commonly as the Ghost walk) begins in the centuries-old station. Read More »

Caroline Park House

Caroline Park House dates from 1685. It was commissioned for Sir George Mackenzie, 1st Lord Tarbat (1630 - 1714) and has a reputation for being haunted. In 1683, George Mackenzie had bought the Royston Barony and had originally named this building Royston House. Read More »

Castell-y-Bere

Castell-y-Bere

Close to Llanfihangel-y-pennant is the native Welsh castle known as Castell-y-Bere. Constructed from stone, on top of a rocky hillock that overlooks the Dysynni Valley it was once the largest and most richly ornamented castles in Wales. Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, a.k.a. Llywelyn the Great (c. Read More »

Castle de Bergh

There is or rather was a very ancient castle in Lancashire near Liverpool called Castle de Bergh which belongs to a noble family of that name. Many years ago the possessor of the castle Mr de Burgh died and the castle was then let out to various of the tenantry among whom was a carpenter. Read More »

Castle House, Buckingham

The prestigious Grade I listed Castle House can be found on West Street and dates back to the 15th century. There would have been many notable visitors to Castle House, including King Charles I who held a Council of War here. Read More »

Castle of Mey

The Castle of Mey, formerly known as Barrogill Castle dates from the 16th century and was built by the Earl of Caithness. The castle is haunted by the ubiquitous Green Lady, said to have been the daughter of the 5th Earl. Read More »

Castle Rising

Castle Rising

The now ruined but still imposing Castle Rising with its extensive earthworks was built around 1140AD and is one of the most famous castles of its kind in the country. Back when it was built this area was a busy sea port, though it is now probably four miles from the waters of the North Sea. Read More »

Castle Wildenstein

Castle Wildenstien

Castle Wildenstein (Schloss Wildenstein) dates from the around the 16th century and has acquired a reputation for being haunted. According to John and Anne Spencer in The 'Encyclopedia of Ghosts and Spirits', on 1st March 1953, Baroness von Lobenstein reported seeing an apparition of a young boy in a sailor suit stood in the kitchen. Read More »

Castleshaw Roman Camp (Rigodunum)

Castleshaw Roman Camp

The original fort dates to the Flavian period, and was probably erected during the governship of Agricola (AD77 to AD83), when new Roman roads were being constructed in the Pennines as an aid to Roman expansion in the North. The larger fort became a smaller fortlet in the Trajanic era. Read More »

Cathedral Church of St Peter, York Minster

The largest gothic cathedral in northern Europe, York Minster dates from between 1220 and 1472. It is built upon the site of York's Roman Basilica and subsequently the location chosen for an early Christian Church (627AD – 640AD). Read More »

Cawood Castle

Cawood Castle was a palace of the Archbishop of York probably built upon an early Saxon fortification dating from the reign of King Athelstan (Æthelstan) 925AD - 939AD. During the English Civil War (1642–1651) Cawood was fought over several times and served as a prisoner of war camp. Read More »

Caxton Gibbet

The Caxton Gibbet stands on a small knoll between Cambridge and St Neots. Not far away is the pub of the same name, which has been haunted in the past by phantom footsteps.

According to a local story one of the early landlords intended to rob three wealthy travellers who were staying at the inn. Read More »

Ceddesfield Hall

Ceddesfield Hall is a Grade II listed building dating from the 18thcentury. Now a community centre, Ceddesfield Hall was originally built as a rectory for Reverend George Barrington. The previous rectory which this replaced burned down in 1793. It was this older building that was associated with the ‘Pickled Parson’. Read More »

Cessnock Castle

The castle dates from the 15th century, and was a stronghold of the Campbell's. The castle was converted to a mansion house much later in its history. Read More »

Chance To Be Part Of Project Albion

ASSAP (The Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) in partnership with Mysterious Britain & Ireland is opening up its long running Project Albion to enable members of the public to directly contribute towards it. Read More »

Chapel Farm, St. Leonards

The following extract is taken from Cholesbury-cum-st Leonards Local History Group Newsletter No 17 2013 – 2014, and concerns an article by Anne Batchelor tracing back her Tudor ancestors to Chapel Farm and her good relationship with the family who now own it now. Read More »

Chapman Haunting, Cheshunt

Protecting the names of witnesses and the identity of a haunted location is a good and ethical practice for investigators to adhere to, however, sometimes it does make identifying historic cases difficult. The following account is taken from 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain' by John Ingram (1897). Read More »

Chaucer Road, Bedford

The following extract is taken from an article by Andrew Watt entitled ‘15 ghost sightings in Bedford’, which was published in ‘Bedfordshire on Sunday’ (10 March 2015). ‘In 1972, a mother living in Chaucer Road who was woken by her baby's screams, spotted a shadowy hand cross the wall of the room and come to rest on the baby's face. Read More »

Chingford Mount Cemetery

Dating from 1884, the 41.5 acres Chingford Mount Cemetery is reputedly haunted and was mentioned in a 2005 article by Mark Killiner on the Guardian website entitled 'Things that go bump in the night'. Read More »

Cholesbury Camp

The oval shaped Cholesbury Camp or The Danish Camp is a multivallate Iron Age hill fort covering 15 acres with ramparts measuring between 9.5 ft. and 34 ft in height. Within the defences can be found the Church of St Lawrence and if stories are to be believed, phantom animals that have been heard snorting and fighting each other.

Christ Church, Greyfriars

Christchurch

There is a tradition that during the Victorian times a Night Watchman came across the ghosts of two beautiful ladies in the ancient burial ground of Greyfriars. The two ladies had haunted the site oblivious of each other for centuries, but, once they noticed each other and saw that they were of equal beauty, they got angry and started to fight. Read More »

Christchurch Priory

Although there has been a church situated on this site since around 800AD, the current building was started in 1094 by Ranulf Flambard.

Strange noises have been heard within the church that do not seem to have a physical source. There are also reports of phantom monks.

Craig-y-Nos Castle


Rooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfastRooms from £55.00 per night midweek with continental breakfast



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site