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Abingdon Old Gaol

The Grade II listed Old Gaol in Abingdon dates from 1811 and was the first British jail with wings. It closed as a jail in 1868. Between 1974 and 2002 the building as used a leisure centre and it was during this time that it gained a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

Ackergill Tower

In the 15th century the castle was owned by the Keith family, who were in the midst of a feud with the Gunn family. After several murders and revenge murders, Helen Gunn of Braemore, was abducted by Dugald Keith who lived in the tower. Read More »

The Acton Arms, Morville

The ghost that haunts this 18th century establishment appeared every day and sometimes more than once each day according Mrs Mary Walker, the landlady during the early 1970s. It was described as "like seeing a sheet flick from one door to the other". In 1973 Marc Alexander nominated The Acton Arms as England's most frequently haunted inn. Read More »

Admiral Tryon's Ghost

Admiral Tryon

Following an eight year search, on 22nd August 2004, Christian Francis of Lebanon Divers found the wreck of HMS Victoria near Tripoli. Standing vertically with her bow and the first 30m of her length buried in the seabed, she was the victim of naval blunder and her sinking in 1893 is directly linked to reports of an apparition being witnessed. Read More »

Aintree Racecourse

Aintree is the home of the famous four mile long Grand National handicap horse race which was first run 170 years ago on 26 February 1839 (won by a horse named ‘Lottery’), it is also possibly haunted. Read More »

Aira Force

Aira Force on the A592, 3 miles from Glenridding, is probably one of the best know waterfalls in the Lake District, especially after appearing in three of William Wordworths poems. The name derives from the Norse word for waterfall, ‘fors’, and Aira Force is where the Aira Beck plummets 66 foot down toward Ullswater. Read More »

Albemarle Street

Albermarle Street is built on the site of Clarendon House, home of Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon (Born 18 February 1609 – Died 9 December 1674). The Paranormal Database refers to a 1960s ghost called George Payne was seen on Albermarle Street. Read More »

Aldgate Underground Railway Station

Aldgate Railway Station which serves the Circle Line and Metropolitan Line opened on 18 November 1876 and is said to have been built on a Plague Pit where hundreds of victims of the Bubonic Plague of 1665 were buried. Daniel Dafoe mentions this ‘terrible pit’ in the churchyard of the Parish of Aldgate in his ‘A Journal of the Plague Year’ published 1722*. Read More »

Alfred Street, Redcar

At 2.00 am, one morning in 1963, Mrs Pamela Iredale, her brother Barry Gardner and her nine-month baby fled their terraced house in Alfred Street, Redcar.

Mrs Iredale said, quote: "I just couldn't stand it any longer.. I didn't believe in ghosts, but I wouldn't spend another night in that house for a fortune. Read More »

All Saints Vicarage, Bristol

In 1846 the Bristol Times published the following story entitled ‘A Ghost at Bristol’ which concentrated on the vicarage of the Grade II listed All Saints Church, parts of which date back to the 12th Century. Read More »

Allhallows, Bedford

The following extract is taken from an article by Andrew Watt entitled ‘15 ghost sightings in Bedford’, which was published in Bedfordshire on Sunday (10 March 2015). ‘In 1979 in Allhallows, near to the Midland Bank (now HSBC)*, shoppers were surprised to see a mediæval friar in his hooded gown calmly walking down the street meditating on his rosary. Read More »


Built by Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland (Born 5 September 1641 – Died 28 September 1702) in 1688, the Grade I listed Althorp House and estate is the ancestral home of the Spencer family. Read More »

Anna Maria Porter’s Experience, Esher

Anna Maria Porter

John Ingram in his ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ (1897) recounts a reported experience by the authoress Anna Maria Porter (also referred to as 'L'Allegra') (born 1780 – died 1832). Born in Durham and spending her earliest years in Edinburgh, Anna’s family moved to London sometime in the 1790’s. Read More »

Anne Blakemore & Tobias Gill (Black Toby)

On 24 June 1750, Anne Blakemore of Walberswick died. Her body was found on the Walks a mile west of Blythburgh and negro drummer named Tobias (Toby) Gill from the 4th Dragoons (Lieutenant General Sir Robert Rich's Regiment of Dragoons) was accused of her murder. The Dragoons had been based in that area to combat smuggling and Toby had been drunk near where Anne’s body was discovered. Read More »

Appuldurcombe House

Appuldurcombe Manor

Appuldurcombe House is the impressive shell of a grand 18th century baroque style stately home of the Worsley family. Read More »

Apsley House

The Grade I listed Apsley House or Number One, London, is the former home of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (Born 1 May 1769 – Died 14 September 1852) and is now a museum managed by English Heritage. Read More »

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle sits in a prominent position on castle hill above the town and is now in a ruined and dangerous condition. The castle was important during the Scottish - English wars, and was scene to an infamous event known as Wallace's Larder. An English garrison was stationed at the Castle, and Wallace arranged a decoy fire in the village. Read More »

Ardvreck Castle

This ruined castle on the shore of Loch Assynt, was originally built by the MacLeods. Read More »

Armboth House

Armboth House was haunted following the drowning of the households daughter on the night before her wedding day. It is said that bells could be heard, a ghostly dog could be seen swimming in Thirlmere Lake (where she was murdered) and reception meal places laid out by some spirit, all taking place on the anniversary of that fateful night, which just happens to be Halloween. Read More »

Arnos Manor Hotel, Bristol

Built as a home in 1760 by local merchant William Reeve, the seventy three bed-roomed Arnos Manor Hotel has a reputation of being haunted. The Arnos Manor has its own Chapel in which Nuns would ran a girls school. One of the reported ghost stories involves a nun who is suspected to have fallen pregnant. She reputedly committed suicide and was bricked up in a wall. Read More »

Ashintully Castle

The castle dates back to the 1500's, and was built as a fortified tower house by the Spalding family. Read More »

Ashley Hall

The Grade II listed Ashley Hall dates from the late 16th century and has been linked to stories of a ghostly White Lady. T Ottway, in his 'News from the invisible world: A collection of remarkable narratives on the certainty of supernatural visitations from the dead to the living (1853)' gives an account of a ghost at a place named Ashley Park. Read More »

Astley Castle

The ruined Astley Castle is a Grade II listed fortified manor house dating from the 16th century. The manor had belonged to the Astley family since the 12th century but passed to the Grey’s in 1420 when Joan de Astley, wife of Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn (Born 1362 – Died 30 September 1440), inherited the estate of her father Sir William de Astley, 5th Baron Astley. Read More »

Aston Hall

Aston Hall

The origins of Aston can be traced back to before the Domesday Book (1086-7) which shows the manor named as "Estone". Before the Norman invasion Earl Eadwin held the manor, then by 1086 it was controlled by William FitzAnsculf. This eventually passed into the hands of John atte Holte through marriage in 1367. The Holtes remained at Aston for the following two centuries. Read More »

Athelhampton Manor

Athelhampton Hall

There are still parts of this manor dating back 500 years, it was occupied early in its history by the Martyn family from 1350 to around 1600. The Martyn family were devoutly catholic and may have hidden priests within the house during the time England was under protestant rule. Priest holes, which are small secret recesses within walls, have been found which attest to this. Read More »



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