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Legends


Carlin Maggie Stone

Carlin Maggie's stone is a 40-foot natural stone column formed of volcanic basalt. Read More »

Carn Brea

Carn Brea was occupied from 3,900BC, and was protected from attack by stone ramparts. Archaeological evidence shows the settlement was attacked and burned down at some point in its history. Hoards of Celtic coins have also been found on the hill during excavation. Read More »

The Giant of Carn Galva

This tale tells of a gentle giant who lived in Cornwall, the land of giants, and a place where they were thought responsible for many of the natural landscape features. The story appears in Traditional and Hearthside Stories of West Cornwall by W. Botrell 1870. Read More »

Carn March Arthur

A rock overlooking the Dovey Estuary, on a hill above the A493, bears a depression that is said to be the hoofprint of Arthur's horse.

Directions: The rock lies above the A493.

Carreg Arthur (Arthur’s Rock)

Carreg Arthur is the name given to a hefty volcanic boulder estimated to be about 450 million years old that stands in a scenic area of North Wales to the south of Llanrug. Read More »

Castle Dore and the Tristan Stone

Castle Dore is an Iron age hillfort dating from around 200BC.  It was possibly home to Cunomonus a local king who had a son called Drustanus. The castle is also associated with the legend of Tristan and Isolde. Read More »

Castle Hill, Thetford

Castle Hill (Castle Mound or Military Parade) is the remains of Thetford's second castle, a 12th century motte and bailey castle which replaced the towns earlier 11th century Red Castle. Read More »

The Cerne Abbas Giant

Cerne Abbas Illustration

The Cerne Abbas Giant or the 'Rude Man' is one of the largest hillfigures in Britain, he (the figure's gender is beyond doubt) is one of two representations of the human form, the other being the Long Man of Wilmington in East Sussex. The giant, carved in solid lines from the chalk bedrock measures in at 180 feet high, and carries a huge knobbled club, which measures 120 feet in length. Read More »

Chance To Be Part Of Project Albion

ASSAP (The Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) in partnership with Mysterious Britain & Ireland is opening up its long running Project Albion to enable members of the public to directly contribute towards it. Read More »

Chanctonbury Ring

Chanctonbry Ring

Chanctonbury Ring is a hill on the Sussex Downs some 700 feet above sea level and, until the hurricane, which swept across Southern England, was crowned with beech trees. Excavations at the site showed that the ramparts dated from 300 BC. Remains of several Roman buildings were found during the early digs, along with various items and fragments of pottery. Read More »

Chapel Porth

The giant Bolster is said to have terrorised the area until he fell in love with St Agnes. She asked him to prove his love to her by filling a hole in the cliffs at Chapel Porth with his blood.

This was deemed an easy task by the giant but the hole led to the sea, and the giant duly poured his lifeblood into the hole and died of blood loss. Read More »

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Newington

The Grade I listed Church of St Mary the Virgin in Newington possibly dates from as early as 1163 and was built by Richard de Lucy. There is a Devil legend attached to the church relating to a stone that once stood on the corner of Church Lane but was moved to the church entrance in 1936. Read More »

Church of St. Meilig, Llowes and Moll Walbee's Stone

The medieval church of St Meilig was rebuilt in 1853, though the bottom of the tower may be a remnant of the earlier building. Inside the church is a standing stone with a cross carved into it, which possibly dates from the 6th or 7th century. The stone which is thought to have stood at or near the site of a 6th century monastery founded by St Meilig at Croesfeilig. Read More »

Clegyr Boia

This rocky hilltop was occupied during the Neolithic period around 3800BC, when there were a number of rectangular houses on the summit. During the Iron Age the hill was fortified and served as a hillfort. A rampart, which can still be seen today, was completed around the hill with an entrance towards the Southwest. Read More »

Cley Hill

Cley Hill 2

Cley hill has a Devil legend attached to it. The Devil was travelling from Somerset carrying a huge sack of earth, with which he intended to bury the town of Devises. The people of the town had offended him in some way probably by converting to Christianity. Read More »

Clitheroe Castle

It has been suggested in Roby’s Traditions of Lancashire, that the Motte and Bailey Clitheroe Castle may date back to before 1086, being built by Roger de Poictou (also known as Roger Pictavensis). Roger was a supporter of King William I and was granted 398 Saxon Manors following the Norman invasion of 1066. Read More »

Closeburn Castle

Many ancient families are associated with omens and signs that traditionally tell of death or illness in the family line. These omens range from radiant boys, banshees, phantom drummers and various animals. The Kirkpatrick family who inhabited Closeburn Castle have their own specially symbol of misfortune: that of a swan with a bloody breast, relating to an old family story. Read More »

Cloud Hill

A giant is said to have dropped his shoe on the summit of the hill, he was startled by a small animal and fled leaving his shoe behind. The shoe turned to stone over the years and now resembles a huge boulder with a hollowed out face.

Also on the summit of Cloud Hill is a stone outcrop known as the drummer's knob. Read More »

Coed-y-Bleiddiau (Forest of the Wolves)

The Coed-y-Bleiddiau was once ancient woodland where it is said that the last wolf in Wales was allegedly killed. There is now another living wolf in woodland, but it’s safe because it’s made form of a living willow sculpture.

The Giant Comoran

Jack slaying Comoran

Cormoran was the name given to the giant who is said to have built and lived on St Michael's Mount, he was killed by Jack the giant slayer. Read More »

Congresbury Church

The Yew trees in the church yard are said to be the relatives of an ancient tree which sprouted from a staff planted in the ground by St Congar. Yew trees grow very slowly and are often found in ancient churchyards. In many cases they are the descendants of ancient trees planted when the church was first built. The story may be a folk memory related to the original planting. Read More »

Cornu

According to legend the Cornu was a great black bird, described as being like a wingless and featherless heron that occupied a cavern at the medieval pilgrimage site of St Patrick’s Purgatory, Saint’s Island, Read More »

Cors-y-Gedol Burial Chamber

Cors Y Gedol Burial Chamber

The Cors-y-Gedol burial chamber which still has it's capstone intact is also referred to as Arthur’s Quoit and can be found close to some ancient hut circles known as the Irishmen’s huts on the slope of Moelfre. Read More »

Crail

A large stone, close to the churchyard is said to have been thrown by the Devil from the Isle of May. It is possible that the stone was part of a sacred site here before the church. Read More »

Cranmere Pool

Robert Charles Hope tells us in 'The Legendary Lore Of The Holy Wells Of England' (1893) that 'Cranmere Pool is believed to be a place of punishment for unhappy spirits, who are frequently to be heard wailing in the morasses which surround it'. Read More »



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